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Project Information

Project time in the shop has been limited this summer between outside chores, hot temperatures and learning how to use Sketch-Up. A month or so back, the washer died and so we bought a new washer and dryer. When we moved into the house 4 years ago, we agreed that I would upgrade the laundry room when the washer and dryer had to be replaced.

I pulled the old laminate cabinets out, moved them to the storage room, painted the walls, put down new trim, and replaced the old light with an LED light in time for the arrival of the new washer and dryer. I still needed to build the table over the top of the washer and dryer

From there, I headed out the shop and pulled out a big pile of rough maple boards and started the planer. I also had a new toy to try out, a Wixey Digital Planer thickness gauge. I'll write up a review one of these days. After all of the boards were planed, I drew up some basic Sketch-Up plans for the table top and the shelves and cabinets to practice my new Sketch-Up skills.

The top sits on a cleat that wraps around the side and back walls. I used 2" cabinet screws to secure the top to the cleat. The heads of the screws provide a bit of a steam punk look. A vertical support side piece closes in the open side, and a spacer between the washer and dryer close everything up around them.

Since I'm also trying out different approaches to build cabinets for the future kitchen cabinet remodel I tried a very basic box held together with nothing more than finish screws. It does the job, but probably isn't the most sturdy and long lasting approach.

The cabinet doors were made using Freud Shaker style rail-style set. The panels are supposed to be maple, but I have a feeling the plywood I bought at the big box store was not maple, since the other side looks a lot like pine and the exposed side doesn't look like maple.

Everything was finished off with Arm-R-Seal and 800 grit between coats. I pre-finished all of the panels before assembly which makes finish sanding a lot easier but assembly is more difficult since any scratch or gouge shows through the finish.

All in all, a decent project to practice a lot of new ideas, skills, and test out methods to use in the upcoming Kitchen cabinet build next year. My wife is very happy with the bright new space with plenty of the storage space in the cabinets, a large area for folding laundry, and even some shelves where she can put some of her antique irons.

Gallery

Comments

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2,199 Posts
Nice job on the laundry remodeling. That counter top/folding area over the machines is a great idea.

How hard it is to get to the water valves? It would be a good idea to make the back 12 inches of that counter top hinged with a piano hinge for access to the water shut off valves and power plugs.

When ever we're out of town for extended periods I always unplug both machines and turn off the water faucets to the washer to prevent flooding if a hose should break.
 

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I actually notched out an opening so I can reach the valves. The second picture sort of shows it.
 

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230 Posts
Nice work, the two tone actually looks great whether it was intentional or not. Panels look like birch, which has similar grain to maple but the heartwood is reddish brown.
 

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1,411 Posts
Earl- Looks good. did you use pre-finished ply for the carcasses? If you have not tried it yet, you should. Biggest time saver I have come up with in a long time for basic cabinetry in the small shop.
 
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