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Project Information

Summer made a come back after the record breaking - 16 C (3.2 F) temperature last Monday - the weekend was 14 C (57 F). I spent an afternoon finishing a few projects including this shop-made sharpening jig for my spindle and bowl gouges. You can use it with the Wolverine Vee pocket or simply make your own V- pocket. All you need are: T nuts, bolts, scarp wood, washers, wing nut,and two stripes of friction tapes. I'll replace the carriage bolt once I get my hand on a better knob.

I tried the jig with a cheap spindle gouge before I used it on my regular gouges.

If you want to make a different but similar purpose version of fingernail grind sharpening jig, check out this article:

http://www.finewoodworking.com/pdf/ShopBuiltJig.pdf

Gallery

Comments

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328 Posts
NICE! thats one of the things on my todo list.
 

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1,487 Posts
Well done and well thought Chuck. Wolverine should see a drop on their sales soon !!

I believe you cut the offset at the band saw?

So you'll be able to complete your project, I'll come up soon with tips on how to make your own jig knobs.

And your workbench top looks quite comfortable too.

Best,

Serge

PS: Tool not included I believe !

http://www.atelierdubricoleur.spaces.live.com
 

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692 Posts
Hi Serge,

Thanks for your comments.

Everything was first cut on my tablesaw including the recess (offset) and then drilled (including the slot). The bandsaw was used to cut the curve and the leg only.

Tools used: TS; BS; Drill press and stationary sander.
 

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Very nice.
 

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Cool jig.
 

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A very nice jig Chuck and it looks like it does a great job.

I don't want to be controversial here or negative and I well understand the desire for a fingernail jig, but after doing a half-good FN grind by hand for awhile, I am finally doing it much better lately. It isn't just the practice that has helped. I re-read a FWW article on the subject and based on that improved my technique quite a bit. It still probably isn't quite as good as your jig produces, but it is good enough and works extremely well.

My reason for saying the above is not to knock you down or take away the joy of your successful jig. I just want to tell folks that if they are willing to take the time and patience to learn some of these hand skills, they will find doing these tasks is very easy, quick and efficient. I have made and used many good sharpening jigs in my time which really worked well, but it is amazing how much more fun woodworking is when you are not dependent on sharpening jigs. I am no handwork expert or obsessed with it. For me it is just trying to reduce the drudge and maximize fun. I hope you don't think me a jerk for using your post to say this. Like they say, "the road to hell is paved with good intentions".
 

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Hey Mike,

Good to hear about your view. No feeling of offence at all at this end. I agree sharpening of gouges or chisels can be done free hand. I used to sharpen my skew chisels and spindle gouges, without any aid of any jig too (using the 40 degree template from the FWW article). I decided to build this jig simply for higher consistency in how I sharpen my gouges. Yes, the use of jig doesn't necessarily mean a lot better result … the making of the jig in itself was a fun experience though - especially after you found out your project worked as well as it was designed to!
 

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Nice looking jig. Some fancy woods.
 

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Thanks for that very gracious answer to my comments Chuck. I can sure relate to the joy in making something that works well. And from the looks of the grind on you gouge in the photo your jig sure does the job.
 
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