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Project Information

Saw a picture of Carole Rothman's yarn bowl on the internets and knew I had to make some for the knitters in the family. Tracked down Scrollsaw magazine issue #55 for the plans and off I went.

The first bowl is poplar with peruvian walnut accents. The second is peruvian walnut with an aspen & padauk base. Should have went with something harder than the aspen, because the padauk really wanted to stain it. The last bowl is baltic birch plywood with more of the peruvian walnut accents.

I epoxied a whole bunch of bb's in the base to keep them from tipping over when the yarn is pulled out.

The two lighter colored bowls were finished with a coat of Seal-A-Cell and three coats of Arm-R-Seal. The oil finish made the walnut bowl way darker than I wanted, so it got three coats of General Finishes water based poly. All satin finish.

The plans said to cut the first ring and use that to mark the next one and so forth. Trouble with that is if you go off track while sawing, your errors get multiplied with each new ring you cut. That leads to a ton of extra sanding (which there is plenty of anyway). I found it much easier to lay out all of the rings on paper first before cutting.

Gallery

Comments

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17,398 Posts
Nice bowl. Interesting thing here is that it can be considered as knitting tool also.
 

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8,696 Posts
Well done beautiful work! Nice finish too! I bet the knitters on your family love them!
 

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Great one. My wife is thinking of starting to knit again, I will have to keep this in mind.
 

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51 Posts
Is there a lot of shaping to do after the rings are cut?

- lateralus819
Kevin,

The rings are cut at a progressively steeper angle the closer you get to the base. This is what gives the bowl it's gentle curve. The closer you can stay on track while sawing, the less sanding you will have to do later. It really pays to go slow at the scrollsaw if you don't have a lot of experience with it (like me). For the sanding, you start with the inside before the bottom is glued on. I used my angle drill with a 2" foam backed sanding disc starting at 80 grit and working my way up through 325 grit. I was surprised, but it wasn't that hard to keep the desired shape, just keep the sander moving. After the bottom is glued on, I sanded the outside with a random orbit sander while holding the bowl in my lap.

Hope that helps,
Chuck
 

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Thank you for your kind words everyone :)
 

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Gorgeous! I usually use a Cool Whip container to hold my yarn. This is better!!
 
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