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Project Information

So I think that I have an addiction to making these rings. The solid rings were made first then I took a stab at the multi-layered rings.
Top row: Red Oak with Cumaru center- solid Spalted Maple- Cumaru with Red Oak center (The finance wanted a really small ring, its a size 3.5)
Bottom row: Solid Ipe- Solid Hickory- Brazilian Cherry outsides, Ipe center, Maple inner stripes

All of the rings are a strong 1/16" thick not quite 3/32", and yes I know that the rings are rather wide but I hate wearing narrow rings. The solid rings all came from 3/4" scrap flooring that we could not install in a floor because of the crazy color variation . . . But perfect for a unique ring though! They are finished with 2 coats shellac and 2 coats of commercial grade Poly that we use on floors. Enjoy!

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Comments

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Pretty cool. I've never worn a ring made of wood, how do they hold up?
 

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Ive been wearing them all week at work and they are holding up well, I had one made out of solid Brazilian Cherry but it broke rather quickly. The maple, hickory, and Ipe make really durable wood floors so I thought that they would also make durable rings. They are really easy to make too, just a spade bit slightly smaller that the hole you want, a 1-1/4" hole saw to cut it out, I used a drill rasp to bore out the hole to the right diameter, then a belt sander to make it the right thickness. Afterwards I hand sand them with 100 grit, water pop, 220 grit, water pop 320grit, then finish.
 

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I have thought about making some.. I was wondering like jayjay how they hold up. My daughter has been asking me if I can make her one in the lathe..
 

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Great rings. Nice use of scraps. I like how they are different sizes/widths. Some people like skinny rings and others like them wide.

Keep it up.

Scrappy
 

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I LOVE wood rings…I've made a few but my problem is I always end up breaking them off of something. Kudos to yours LOVE the grains.
 

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nice job on the rings…never thought of not turning them on the lathe….good job, and I am surprised that the brazillian cherry broke considering it is also used in flooring.
 

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The brazilian cherry does make some fantastic flooring, some of my favorites actually, but BC has zero flexibility and can be rather brittle at times. I have found that hickory has some of the best flexibility when it comes to flooring. I have found that maple has some flexibility and the ipe is almost indestructible in my opinion. I just found a piece of beautiful Burl hickory on Friday so I'll be posting a new ring soon I hope! I'm looking forward to seeing all of your rings!
 

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Cool, yea those do look pretty wide.
ive been haivng a lot of fun the past couple weeks making rings n bangles too.
i do them on the lathe . dont like wearing them personally, just feels annoying !
 

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One way to help keep the rings from breaking when making them, or afterwards is to use CA glue. I don't use a lathe so when I make my rings I tend to rough cut the wood a bit bigger then the final product, then drill my hole and get it to the size i want. Then I use a really thin supper glue and apply a good bit to the inside hole. That will help strengthen it for when you start on the outside edge of the ring. I also found that the circular sander part on my table top sander is great for quickly and safely removing alot of the material from the outside edge. Just lay the ring flat on its side and slowly and lightly press it to the wheel while firmly pressing down to keep it in control - make sure to use the side of the wheel that is turning in the downward direction as this will help keep the piece pressed down and flat.
 
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