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Project Information

So I had an old assembly/work table that was very tall (for my Sasquatch sized body). I have a project coming up (kitchen and some bath cabinets) that will require working with plywood (yuck). Plywood really requires an out feed table, so I decided to convert my assembly table to a multi-purpose cut/out feed/assembly table that is mobile to work in my small shop.

The legs are repurposed barn wood…maple 4X4s. Rails are SYP…my favorite shop wood. The top is from the old table, cleaned up a bit. Joints are all extra-large mortise and tenon joints cut with the Pantorouter.

Though I don't own a fancy track saw, I installed the Parf system so I can use the holes for clamping and making 90 degree cuts with my poor man's track saw. I will have to get a Fe$tol saw before starting the kitchen project just so I can break down ply easier. I installed the dog holes with the Parf drill guide. Pricey, but worth it in my opinion.

An added bonus of upgrading the old table is storage underneath. I finally have a place for those things that always seem to be somewhere awkward…cross cut sled, miter gauges etc.

I made a video of the assembly if you want to be mildly entertained or want to see the Pantorouter or Parf jig in action before you decide to invest in one.


My woodworking "snobbery" days are about to end, though I decided long ago that I no longer made cabinets and only furniture, I have to tackle some cabinets. I have not made a true kitchen or bath cabinet since the 80's when I was at a shop in Orlando. The nearest thing to them is the miter station I begrudgingly built for the shop (and hated every minute of it). Regardless, once the boxes are made and I can move on to drawers and doors, I will feel more at home.

Gallery

Comments

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Looks great! The effort and time spent on building it will definitely pay off as you begin your cabinet project.
Curious- do you put finish on shop builds like this? Sometime I do, but mostly not.
 

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I had a chuckle about not wanting to make cabinets. I had the same perspective until I priced out some closet systems and decided I could set aside my distaste for making them considering how much they cost. I guess you could say I sold my soul…

I need to.make a versinon of the outfeed and side table for my table saw. I hadn't given much thought to adding some features to the top like dog holes to accommodate other cutting systems.
 

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Slick idea, re-purpose the old table to fit the need. The dog holes will come in handy with glues up also.
 

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What a great idea and thanks for adding the video. What are the blue clamps(?) in the photos. TIA
 

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Looks great! The effort and time spent on building it will definitely pay off as you begin your cabinet project.
Curious- do you put finish on shop builds like this? Sometime I do, but mostly not.

- BB1
Well, a top surface has to have low friction. As to the rest, yes I finish them so they don't age poorly and I get to try out new finishes. I don't go "all out". The base of this table has only one coat of the rub on poly mix.
 

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I had a chuckle about not wanting to make cabinets. I had the same perspective until I priced out some closet systems and decided I could set aside my distaste for making them considering how much they cost. I guess you could say I sold my soul…

I need to.make a versinon of the outfeed and side table for my table saw. I hadn t given much thought to adding some features to the top like dog holes to accommodate other cutting systems.

- EarlS
My dad ran a cabinet shop when he was not making money on art commissions. He always said it was easy money. "Just making boxes" he would say. This was back when it was mostly particle board, glue, staples and formica. Everyone wanted the "modern" look. They were cheap, seemed not too well put together and the amount paid for them was insane…but people wanted a perfect custom job. I would be working across the shop putting laminate on the side of a box and he would be ripping on the industrial table saw and stapling them together as the parts came off the saw. Every 20 minutes or so he would shout "bam, thats another 400 dollars". Not all the kitchens were crap, but most were. Later on I got to work with a real cabinet maker from up North. Only real wood for doors/drawers, face frames doweled together etc. He was an amazing craftsman (just don't mention pocket screws to him). He was the type of cabinet maker that 20 years later during the next remodel the crew would curse because his work had to be take out with a sawsall it was so solid.

New construction in Orlando was a breeze, installing in one day with no demo. During the housing boom in the 80 in the Orlando area, you were on a wait list for most trades. A cabinet shop was as busy as they wanted to be. Eventually folks like Kraftmade got into the game and most folks switched to being installers as the margins were oddly similar to just get the "boxes" in on a truck and install them vs make them.

Alas, I have to go get the plywood and start the stuff….but I will make good ones.
 

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BlueRidge, that is going to be a spendy project now a days. I build a small set and the 1/2" plywood for the cases was $70 a sheet. That was the blond plywood, which was primed, it was actually good stuff, 7 ply. The customer wanted the cabinets painted, so I used Poplar for the frames, shaker style. Good luck.
 

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A nice addition to your shop.
 

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Looks nice, I am in the process of creating the same thing. I think I am going to incorporate some power tools into it just haven't completely decided which ones.
 

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Great job on the outfield / assembly / general purpose table. Really liked the video, the system to drill the holes is unique and looks like it exactly places the holes.

How much time did it take to drill all the holes?
 
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