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Project Information

Not really a wood project but it will be able to make some really cool projects in the future. I picked up this lathe from a nice gentleman for $150. It was really dirty and had a fair amount of rust and needed to have bearings replaced. Over the past several days I completely disassembled the lathe and using electrolosis removed the rust and wire brushed every inch. I then primed the bare metal, one of the benefits of electrolysis is paint removal, and painted with Rustoluem smoke gray. The planks that the bed and motor are attached to are the originals. They were really dirty and beat up pretty bad. I ran the edges over the jointer and then surface planed them to clean up the surfaces. I then sanded them to 150 grit and applied 3 coats of Deft lacquer with a wipe down of 0000 steel wool between coats. The bearings in the headstock were replaced as well as a new belt. Motor bearings were also replaced and while the motor was apart it was painted as well. I am hoping that it was last another 50 years and I can hand it down to my kids. Thanks for looking.

Gallery

Comments

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19,680 Posts
nice lathe
 

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9,309 Posts
cool toy .

good rebuild !
 

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60 Posts
that is one sweet lathe what year is it do you know?
 

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451 Posts
Very nicely done, it looks factory new.
Would have loved to see what it was like before you started.
 

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436 Posts
Very impressive restoration. I assume its a Delta, probably looks great in the same shop with that Unisaw you've got. This makes me want to get back to work on a machine restoration I have.
 

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3,661 Posts
Great job on the restoration. Restoring a tool is a project.

That motor looks huge. Do you know how much horsepower it has?
 

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12 Posts
This is the very first lathe I owned. I learned very quickly that turning was going to be a major part of my shop time and traded up pretty quickly. I am now using my 3rd and 4th lathes. You did a nice job rehabing. Enjoy.
 

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4,420 Posts
Great looking tool, and a great restoration. Looks like it should easily last another generation of woodworkers!
 

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The lathe started out in good condition to begin with, a little dirt and some rust. It all cleaned up well with a wire brush and electrolysis.

Rich….1/2 hp
 

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348 Posts
Great job Ken.

You are an inspiration. Makes me want to finish my Unisaw.

Bothus
 

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2,704 Posts
The lathe is a Rockwell isn't it? Those were the kind we had in school.
 

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1,460 Posts
Jockmike2…..It is indeed a Rockwell. Built in 1962. After getting it vleaned up and back together I am very impressed with the quality of the castings and how heavy this little lathe is. It is also very smooth and no vibration. We'll see how it does after I get some tools and mountings and stick some lumber on it.
 

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89 Posts
I have that very same lathe!

You have a great lathe there. I have used mine since about 1969. I got it in a trade with some other tools for an old motorcycle and cleaned it up and painted it as you did. These old machines never die. The way they are built they just need some tender loving care and they are better than most of the new machines available today. I'm big into resurrecting old machines!

Rufus
 

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Planeman…...This is the 4th old machine I have restored. It has been added to a mostly older (60's) Delta line up. I have a unisaw, Delta 14" bandsaw, and Powermatic 15" drill press all from the 60's. the next restore will be my Crescent 8" jointer which is the oldest tool in the shop. As far as I have been able to tell the jointer was made sometime between 1925 and 1930.
 

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If it works (and/or can be reasonably repaired) and meets the need, keep it. Nice setup.
 

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The nice thing about old lathes is they're just large masses of cast iron once you get past the motor and moving parts. So long as the bearings belts etc are readily available, they should keep on going for centuries to come so long as they're kept where they don't rust. It looks like you cleaned this one up very nice and have yourself one heck-of-a lathe. Great job!
 
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