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I have been woodworking except for my college years, since I was 18 years old and had never made a box joint box.

I have seen many shop made and expensive box joint jigs but did not want to spend time to make one or spend money to buy one. So one day I said to myself "self, there must a simpler way". So playing around with my router table and my router sled I made spacers that fit between the router sled and the router table fence and made this box. For this box I only needed three spacers.

The body is 1/4" maple, the top 1/8" Midwest baltic birch plywood that I veneered with mahagony veneer on both sides, finished with several coats Varathane satin water based polyurethane, 4 1/16" diameter neobidium magnets, and inset hinges.

This is another "stuff from my shop" projects where I only used stuff in my garage.

Total material cost was $0.00!

Gallery

Comments

· Registered
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Excellent First Box. Box joints look tight and well defined. Good choice of contrasting wood
 

· Premium Member
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Looks like you figured that out. Whatcha gonna put in it?
 

· Banned
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fantastic it's never too late for a first of anything in my opinion.i love box joints much more than dovetails,it just fits my style more.yours look great,nice job.
 

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Great box, you can never have too many storage boxes in the shop.
 

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Nice looking box joint box. Inquiring minds want to see more about the "spacers" and how you did the joints. I'm with potzz. I like the speed and simplicity of box joints over the time, and fusssing of DT's especially for quick boxes, and drawers on shop projects. Still a ton of glue surface, so once it dries, you are as tight as you need to be.
 

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Nice looking box joint box. Inquiring minds want to see more about the "spacers" and how you did the joints. I m with potzz. I like the speed and simplicity of box joints over the time, and fusssing of DT s especially for quick boxes, and drawers on shop projects. Still a ton of glue surface, so once it dries, you are as tight as you need to be.

- therealSteveN
I have the Forester Forrest Finger Joint Set blades and have never regretted the purchase, that said I still enjoy the pleasure that comes with a tight Dove tail more:) I will take the hum of the table saw all day over a screaming router any day also:)
 

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Great little box. I also like finger joints over dove tails . I really like the way your hinges came out, I still have not mastered small hinges.
 

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I got my idea from this Finish woodworker YouTube video
and decided that i would try this but add some additional "technology" to this process.
The first piece of technology I added was a clamping method to hold my material as I do not have the finger strength displayed by the Finish woodworker cutting 4 pieces of 1/2" material with a 1/2" router bit.

I wanted to try this as opposed to adding another fixture to my tiny shop as I already way too many, I already had a router sled, router table, and all I needed were spacers.

Secondly, it is obvious to most woodworkers that evenly spaced box joints are merely multiples of the cutter diameter so my next piece of technology was making spacers that are mutiples of the cutter diameter. So I made spacers of 1/2", 1", 2", and 4" about the length of my router sled (~8"). I Added small pieces double sided carpet tape to the spacers as a simple way of attaching them to the router sled. This process worked so well that I am going to remove the carpet tape and insert neobidium magnets to my sled and the spacers for future use.

Here are the steps I used to make my box joint box:
  1. I mounted all for pieces of 1/4" material on my sled on the farthest side from my fence and clamped hem securly.
  2. Carefully align the fence and the sled so that the first cut is on the material farthest from the fence.
  3. Then cut the first box slot.
  4. Attach the 1/2" spacer to the router sled next to the fence to make the next cut.
  5. Remove the 1/2" spacer and attach the 1"spacer to the the seld to make my second cut.
  6. Add the 1/2" spacer along with the 1" spacer to the sled and made the next cut.
  7. Replace the 1/2" and 1" spacers with the 2" spacer to make the next cut.
  8. Add the 1/2" spacer to the 2" spacer to make the next cut.
  9. And so forth stepping through the spacer multiples.

Obviously for a taller box, with more fingers, I would need additional spacers.

This set of spacers will also let me cut 1/2" box joints when starting with the 1" spacer and using the multiples of that bit. I would need to add more spacers if I wanted to make a taller box with 1/2" box joints.

I also think this should work on a table saw with a dado blade and the rip fence.

I hope this explanation is understandable and if I need to add photos or more text.
 

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I really like the way your hinges came out, I still have not mastered small hinges.

- stripit
If you look real close, I have haven't really mastereo them yet either. But I know where I made my mistakes when I set up my router table to cut the hinge reliefs. As with all projects there is a definite learning curve.
 

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Great job. I like the look and the proportions. I prefer splines over box joints, but to each his own. You might want to look here for some jig suggestions. Just click on the blue letters. Keep boxing and keep posting.
 

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Hans-some little box!
 

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Great first box. Joints and hinges look well fit
 

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Thanks for all of the nice comments on my FIRST!
 

· In Loving Memory
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Not a novice any more mate, nice job & a Top3 award as well!.
 
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