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Project Information

Like most shops, I feel like my shop is limited. I have a fairly large garage, but I don't like having stacks of large jigs. So when I made this table saw sled, I wanted it to replace two of my other table saw sleds. This sled, I think, is unique in that it has a bed that folds into an angle on the right hand side. I did this because I got tired of tilting my blade for 45 degree cuts. I'm 43, certainly not an elderly man, but I have back problems as well as knee joints that don't like me. Bending down to crank my table is not fun.

Instead, I made the table fold in such a way that I could do not just 45 degree cuts, but even crazier angles, if I chose to. This allows me to keep my blade at a 90 angle and for me to quickly put it up or down. You'll notice in one of the pictures there's a knob and a latch I use that holds the angle where it needs to be. It's a custom made handle I call 'the debonaire knob'...because it just looks sophisticated.

So the folding table replaced the miter sled I use to use just for cutting angles (crosscutting).

My second sled had a box joint jig that I could remove and put in a track to use whenever I made box joints. It was severely limited to a kerf cut and could only make finger style box joints. With this sled, it had to change. I created a channel and added a mechanism on my sled that can make any size width box joints. It relies on a crank (you can see on the left side in the pictures) that's geared. For every twist of the crank, it rotates a pin that pushes the wood over for the next cut. I was so happy with this that I actually created a device that can be attached to any sled or miter gauge. Now it's not geared, but it just takes twice as long to do what this led does…which limits this sled to '2' turns joints.

In the first picture you can see all the attachments…attach to the front so I can use the sled normally.

I really feel like the pictures I've posted are limited to the overall feel of this sled. I have a video of this sled where I show how I made it but am extremely cautious about submitting it in this project space. You can, however, find it on my youtube page as one of my projects. It was a fun…different project not everyone will care for, but I had fun making it and really enjoy using it.

EDIT: Well it appears other project posts are posting videos? I'll post the video to this but will take it down if it's considered 'spam'.

Gallery

Comments

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so how does it work? I mean is the quality of the angled cuts as good as you had hoped for?

Anything you don't like about it in use so far, or too early to tell. I think I would have kept the poly off the gears. I think the wood with an oil finish would be much better at meshing. but that's my opinion.

I like the idea of doing angled sled cuts using an angled sled too. But for ripping, there's no substitute for leaning blade over, it's just easier than an angled guide.

Interesting idea, maybe tonight I'll watch the video.
 

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so how does it work? I mean is the quality of the angled cuts as good as you had hoped for?

Anything you don t like about it in use so far, or too early to tell. I think I would have kept the poly off the gears. I think the wood with an oil finish would be much better at meshing. but that s my opinion.

I like the idea of doing angled sled cuts using an angled sled too. But for ripping, there s no substitute for leaning blade over, it s just easier than an angled guide.

Interesting idea, maybe tonight I ll watch the video.

- woodchuckerNJ
Hey Jeff, thanks for commenting. I added the grease because it made it a smoother, quieter crank.

Anything I'd change? Not yet. It's not glued together (except for the epoxy on the hinges) so it can still be taken apart. I would like to add rails to the bed in the future and am adding a stop block measuring system for the fence (I'm in my garage now sitting around staring at potentials right now

EDIT: for some reason that's all the words that made it from my phone to the server. Below this sentence I'll do my best to remember what I typed out:

I agree that ripping would be a bad thing to do with this, especially without some sort of hold down clamps to keep the stop from moving while I push it through. I do like making box with this sled as I can easily crosscut edges and flip the 45's over and add hidden splines in the edges easily. In my video I made an octagon where I was able to add hidden splines to hold it together.

I like the box joints that I can make with this…but with my newest jig (one of my other jigs I posted in my project) I made a clamping board that went with my new jig that I COULD incorporate into this sled but would be difficult finding a place to attach it.

If I can remember to and I do find something, I'll certainly post it here and tag you.
 

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man the idea of that is super cool,im really interested in the concept of leaving the ts setup at 90 and adjusting the sled for angle cuts,seems a lot safer too.brilliant idea,im surprised there in commercial sled that will do this.
 

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man the idea of that is super cool,im really interested in the concept of leaving the ts setup at 90 and adjusting the sled for angle cuts,seems a lot safer too.brilliant idea,im surprised there in commercial sled that will do this.

- pottz
Thank you!
That sure is a unique idea, well done.

- ColoradoJake
Very much appreciate it!
 

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i gotta do something like that because i hate changing the blade angle and my saw tilts right? who designed that.
 

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i gotta do something like that because i hate changing the blade angle and my saw tilts right? who designed that.

- pottz
I'm thinking of making something that can be added to any sled. I'll send you a memo if I come up with something.
 

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i gotta do something like that because i hate changing the blade angle and my saw tilts right? who designed that.

- pottz

I m thinking of making something that can be added to any sled. I ll send you a memo if I come up with something.

- MakeThings
thanks i love your concept.
 

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Lot of love and work went into that. Love it!
 

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This is the type of sled I can get behind. One quick question for you…could the top, above the box joint pin, be made a tad taller so you could fit the Kreg top mount t-track with both stops and a tape? It could make the fence too tall but its hard to tell from the video if it would work or not.
 

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This is the type of sled I can get behind. One quick question for you…could the top, above the box joint pin, be made a tad taller so you could fit the Kreg top mount t-track with both stops and a tape? It could make the fence too tall but its hard to tell from the video if it would work or not.

- sansoo22
Oh I think it would work. Funny, I'm making something like that for my sled. Stop block measuring system.
 

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This is mind blowing. I agree w Potz I can't believe a commercial sled like this is not available. What an invention!
 

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Looks like a great tool in and of itself! The features seem endless and it all looks exceptionally well built.
 

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I guess I'm the voice of way too much work on a wooden jig. The issue is anyone who has made wooden jigs knows they have a limited lifespan, where any modicum of accuracy can be expected, then wood happens, and they start getting loose, and inaccurate. This build has concepts of greatness, if even made from formed plastics, but especially metal. Being wooden, it will soon enough fail.

Like the recent finger joint jig, same same. A much easier "simple" jig can be made to do FJ's or Cross cuts. Adding a wedge that gives you any angle is simple work, but realistically how many projects will you need a 33 degree angle on? 45's sure, but you are expending a lot of time, and money here. A simpler jig, you just trash, and rebuild when it's obvious life cycle has expired.
 

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Very very cool. I'll bet you spent a lot of time just staring at it and playing around with different ideas.

I guess I m the voice of way too much work on a wooden jig. The issue is anyone who has made wooden jigs knows they have a limited lifespan, where any modicum of accuracy can be expected, then wood happens, and they start getting loose, and inaccurate. This build has concepts of greatness, if even made from formed plastics, but especially metal. Being wooden, it will soon enough fail.

Like the recent finger joint jig, same same. A much easier "simple" jig can be made to do FJ s or Cross cuts. Adding a wedge that gives you any angle is simple work, but realistically how many projects will you need a 33 degree angle on? 45 s sure, but you are expending a lot of time, and money here. A simpler jig, you just trash, and rebuild when it s obvious life cycle has expired.

- therealSteveN
Perhaps, but some of the satisfaction of creating such an innovative item, and the inventive and (if it were me) trial and error process of doing so, does a lot in terms of expanding and improving one's overall skills and creativity. I have a number of "permanent" wooden jigs. Nothing like this of course, but they seem to have held up through time. Doesn't hurt to keep a dehumidifier in your shop!

YouTube video on my today list!
 

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I guess I m the voice of way too much work on a wooden jig. The issue is anyone who has made wooden jigs knows they have a limited lifespan, where any modicum of accuracy can be expected, then wood happens, and they start getting loose, and inaccurate. This build has concepts of greatness, if even made from formed plastics, but especially metal. Being wooden, it will soon enough fail.

Like the recent finger joint jig, same same. A much easier "simple" jig can be made to do FJ s or Cross cuts. Adding a wedge that gives you any angle is simple work, but realistically how many projects will you need a 33 degree angle on? 45 s sure, but you are expending a lot of time, and money here. A simpler jig, you just trash, and rebuild when it s obvious life cycle has expired.

- therealSteveN
I use to make jigs out of pine and junk plywood. I ended up figuring out I was spending more time making 15 'junk' jigs that I treated like garbage, never put away, tripped on…and at the end of the day, I really didn't enjoy using them as they never felt very accurate due to the rushed nature of putting them together.

Since I started making jigs to last, they're well taken care of…and they last. In one of my recent videos I wrote this line:

"Sometimes the best feeling I get when I go out to my shop is flicking the light switch and seeing the creative energy I've put into my tools and organized tools holders."

I think it's about the same as a woodpecker fan buying and filling an entire wall with red aluminum jigs. Their Harbor Freight Jigs were never taken care of and treated poor enough that they bought several to replace the one. They probably take better care of the woodpecker ones because they're as expensive as they are.

I appreciate your position, but, if you haven't yet, build a jig like it's fine furniture made for a king. You'll enjoy using it and respect the work you put into it. Your projects will feel like a million bucks because the tools you used feel like gold in your hands.
 

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This is mind blowing. I agree w Potz I can t believe a commercial sled like this is not available. What an invention!

- Peteybadboy
Thank you so much!
Looks like a great tool in and of itself! The features seem endless and it all looks exceptionally well built.

- splintergroup
Thank you, it was a fun build!
Very very cool. I'll bet you spent a lot of time just staring at it and playing around with different ideas.
I call it luck, really, when I think of something weird and it ends up working. But I do love to sit in bed at night and stare up at the ceiling, opening drawers in my mind and trying to tackle problems that come with ideas. Really, I get so much satisfaction out of it like I'm playing a really challenging Sudoku puzzle.

Perhaps, but some of the satisfaction of creating such an innovative item, and the inventive and (if it were me) trial and error process of doing so, does a lot in terms of expanding and improving one's overall skills and creativity. I have a number of "permanent" wooden jigs. Nothing like this of course, but they seem to have held up through time. Doesn't hurt to keep a dehumidifier in your shop!
Exactly! If anything else, problem solving gets so much easier for every situation in life!
 

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I love the attention to detail and the obvious pride in your work.
 

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Nice job and congratulations on your 'Daily Top 3' award.
 
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