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13,709 Posts
OMG!!
 

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14,500 Posts
Wonderful shop Phillip.
 

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Great looking shop. I wouldn't expect anything less from you.
 

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Is that a homemade bandsaw?
 

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Philip, Your shop looks so interesting. It's a wonderful shop with a lot of nice equipment and plenty room. Congratulations on a job well done. I love the small machine shop.
 

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wow, that's quite the shop!! Tell us more about the bandsaw.
 

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Philip: Drool stammer Sorry, I just about had a seizure looking at your shop. .... I'm not worthy lol
You are my god. haha What a massively gorgeous shop. One word bud, .. Wow.
I covet your shop.
 

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What a wonderful light you have in that shop.
I cant help beeing in love with that wonderful old metal lathe.
What a place to play with materials.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

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Now this is a shop that any of us would be proud to be working in. It is spacious, well organized and I, personally, would love to have this much head room in my shop. Thanks for the tour. I enjoyed taking a look at your shop.
 

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really nice.
 

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Very nice, Phillip. I can see how this is where you work your magic.

Is the Autoforge in the kitchen ?
 

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Very nice shop, looks like you really like working with your hands and mind. A man that likes his work does a better job.
David
 

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Daaaaaaaaam, you by far have the ultimate workshop. Let me guess you still need more space though? Do you do all your work on the metal lathes or just make the screws and blade adjusters stuff like that? Where do you work on the soles like to flatten and smooth them, also where do you make the blades at?
 

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Derosa and Manitario: the band saw has no manufacturer name on it by I think it may be of German origin. There is a date stamped on the underside of one foot ,1909. Originally meant to be driven by line shaft from above with flat belt, but I converted to vee pulleys and added the 3 hp British 3phase motor which itself is fine example of British engineering as it was. I saw it in a small town in Rhodesia during the war , abandoned , burnt and rusting outside in a yard-the owner wouldn't part with it, saying he would "fix it up one day". Took me three years to relieve him of it.
It used to have beautiful pressed steel wheel covers but these were rusted and burnt beyond recovery so I made the wooden ones. It has roller bearings on the drive shaft and adjustable ball bearings for thrust and lateral bearings-like a bicycle wheel bearing.
It can cut a depth of 14 inches….
 

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Helluvawreck: there is a lot of small stuff accumulated over years that is not easy to show-like engineering tools etc…..
 

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David,
No forge or oven there-not allowed….Anyway, I prefer to leave stuff like heat treatment to dedicated companies to do, then I get certified reliable results. It would be bad if one of my planes was found to have a bad blade…
 

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Mads, the light is good when the sun is right….
The dark green metal working lathe is the iconic South Bend 9 inch screw cutting lathe , made in 1946 in USA. It has never been worked hard or abused and when I got it I just cleaned it and repainted from grey to dark green. i must say it is nice to have two lathes when making planes.The other one is Emco, made in Austria.
 

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I have set up my machines like that so when I am working with one machine the table top of another is close by to use for placing parts eg when making frames and panels where it is possible to have lots of components. Since I employ nobody there it is okay to do this.
However I have not paid enough attention to dust and chip collection, relying on brooms and one of those silly dustbag efforts which do gather chippings in one place but still allow the fine nasty stuff to spread all over- see it has migrated onto all my metal work stuff….






Check out the saw dust shuffle around the work bench….
 

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Ike:
"Daaaaaaaaam, you by far have the ultimate workshop. Let me guess you still need more space though? Do you do all your work on the metal lathes or just make the screws and blade adjusters stuff like that? Where do you work on the soles like to flatten and smooth them, also where do you make the blades at?"

The space is okay for furniture making one off's and small batches . I can get more floor space to assemble stuff by moving those trestle tables if needed.
I make all metal work on my planes apart from blade heat treatment using two metal lathes , one wood lathe and that mill drill. I buy out small screws.
I make blades and flatten soles etc by surface grinding using my Brown & Sharpe surface grinder which stays on the other side of the wall, but still inside the building-see pictures






. Another old machine , American made around 1948 I think. Would be worth a total rebuild as one can still get critical parts.
 

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This is bringing back old memories of my machine shop days (fond for the most part). I cut my teeth on the Lapmaster and Blanchard grinder machines (among others).

You truly straddle the fence between wood and metal.
 
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