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Project Information

Recently I was graciously given a maple burl slab by a fellow LJ friend. Here is the result of my first working with of the slab. I think this rolling pin turned out fairly nicely, probably my favorite of the seventeen I have made. I did discover, however, that lathe chisels don't really like burl; it was definitely worth the work though!

I had a little bit of fun with the finish, which is french polish. Being my first time french polishing, I was pleasantly surprised how well the finish looks! It took somewhere in the realm of eight hours to complete; it is 24" long, and has a diameter of 3.5 inches. It definitely has some heft to it, weighing in at 2.5 lbs; I really like a large pin though, makes it really fill solid. This rolling pin also has a wall mound for decoration for when it is not in use. Overall, it was a fun rolling pin to make, made from a wood that really pops under a good finish!
-Dale M.

Gallery

Comments

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Outstanding wood, beautiful pin, job well done.
 

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Gorgeous roller and the hanger is great too.
 

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beautiful roller that wood really pops,wifes gotta love it.
 

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Thanks Guys!
 

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As someone who enjoys baking, I can honestly say that I would be worried about ruining it. I would enjoy using it though.
 

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Great work, Dale! What a great way to use that burl!
 

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Beautiful piece. Couple of questions…

1) Did you experience any grain raising when it got wet on your first use? If so, how did you resolve?

2) What did you fill the voids with?
 

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Damn, what a beauty! Nice work.
 

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Thanks for all the encouragement guys!

Beautiful piece. Couple of questions…

1) Did you experience any grain raising when it got wet on your first use? If so, how did you resolve?

2) What did you fill the voids with?

- F250
Pete, I'm not really sure what to say. As a 16 year old woodworker, and not much of a cook, I don't really know. This is a brand new pin than hasn't seen use yet, I'm hoping to find a buyer soon.
However, I have made somewhere in the neighborhood of seventeen pins and have not heard of grain rising (in rolling pins) from my customers. I have had problems with grain rising from other kitchen utensils I have sold, most of them though were spatulas that "lived" in a "wet" environment though.
My biggest recommendation to people is to not rinse or apply water in any circumstance to rolling pins, but to rather wipe off with a moist wash cloth. This seems to work much better in my experience.
Hope this reply answers your question; sorry it is so lengthy.
-Dale M.
 

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Forgot to mention what the voids were filled with. Being burl, it did have many voids; all small voids were filled with thin and medium CA glue. The larger voids I packed with maple sawdust from my belt sander and then saturated them thoroughly with thin CA glue. Seems to work fairly well.
-Dale M.
 

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Yes it is definitely worth the work. Love the Burl, and you have served it well.

Thanks for sharing.
 

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Beautiful rolling pin Dale!
 
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