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Looks good AJ. These things become addictive.
 

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Looking good AJ! Chop Chop!! Mom should love having that! Or could make a great Christmas gift!
 

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Super looking board AJ
 

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Thanks for the nice comments guys! Your right woodshaver! Chop Chop!
 

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Looks like a great build! I have yet to venture into a cutting board, but it's on my to-do list. One suggestion though: if you use red oak for a cutting board, you should use a grain filler on it to fill in the pores, as they often harbor bacteria. I'm sure it won't be much of a problem though, nice job again!
 

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Nice looking cutting board,AJ. Lab7654 is right on that red oak.It is open grain and traps bacteria - especially if cutting meat on it. Filling the grain will help eliminate that…...........Jim
 

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AJ,
This is a grand looking cutting board!!

Thanks for sharing
 

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How do you fill the grain? And where can you get grain filler? Thanks for the nice comments!
 

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May not be necessary to fill the grain, because the end grain is not on a cutting surface. If it's a concern, work some beeswax into the end grain and call it a day.

Good job on this, I'm planning on making one soon.

If you don't already, I recommend picking up or making a cabinet scraper…you'll save money one sandpaper in the long term, and get a better finish as well.
 

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I'm not sure you would want to fill the grain on a cutting board. I've never looked into the food safe qualities of grain filler, but it may end up just washing off anyway. With that said, I would avoid using this for meat as red oak is pretty porous.

It looks really nice though! Congrats on your cutting board right of passage! They are very addicting. Consider making an end grain board next. You can use softer woods for end grain boards if getting hardwood is a challenge for you. In fact a company in Canada makes BEAUTIFUL (and VERY expensive) end grain boards out of Larch, which is actually softer than Douglas-fir. My parents have a few. They paid over 300.00 for one of them.
 

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In addition, it looks like you got a little burning when cutting the profile on the edges (which looks really nice). There is a way to avoid that, but it is a bit dangerous, so make sure you have the proper safety equipment (push blocks and feather boards)

Route the end grain sides first. When you route the end grain, use the "climb cut" method. As mentioned, this can be very dangerous so make sure you are comfortable enough with your router table and safety equipment. After you route the end grain, route the edge grain normally. You will get less burning, a smoother cut, and a lot less sanding.
 

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^^ the climb cut method works but I would first route most of the profile the standard way (against the bit). After that, back the fence up just a little so you only take a slight shave, and then execute a climb cut. Don't do it all at once…
 

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Good point chuck. I still always climb cut end grain to avoid tear out, but a steep profile like that would have been done in 3 passes.
 

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Hi AJ,
If the bacteria become a concern just use some clorox and water mixed never stronger than 1:1. (I use one cup clorox in two cups of water a 2:1 mix and keep in a spray bottle.)
Resteraunts are required to clean wooden chopping surfaces this way daily. I use this method at home after cutting meat or fowl and then I will topcoat with mineral oil every so often. (Mostly when the wife wants to show off the kitchen.)
 

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Thanks for all of the tips and nice comments! Do you think if you wash it before and after you use it would be okay?

Thanks,
AJ
 
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