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Project Information



Here's a project I built over the last few weeks. It's made from Quarter Sawn White Oak and a "beveled mirror." The sides of the box and rear plywood are red oak and ebony G & G style screw plug covers.

I bought this QSWO over a year ago. It was for projects I built to remodel our house. The purchase was for several hundred board feet and this is the last of it.

I included plans if you would like to build one.

It's a recessed cabinet and the box is about 1/4" smaller than the wall opening. This allows for studs or Jack studs that aren't parallel.

Here are a few photos of my work process.

After cutting the parts to width on the table saw I cut them to their final lenght on a table saw sled, this way I know they're square.


Cutting part C. This piece is 1-1/8"
Wide x 9/16" high and 19 1/8" long.


Dry fitting some of the parts to determine where to place the dowels.

Here I'm drilling the dowel holes for the bottom of the stiles. I usually make mortise and tenons for this part but I though I'd try the new dowel jig I recently bought.


Dry fitting the dowels on the upper parts.


I'm using a template I made to mark where the square holes will be mortised on part B.

By lining up the tip on the auger bit at the mortiser with the awl holes allows me to set the mortise machine fence only 2 times.


Making the square mortises on part B.



I'm cutting biscuits slots to join parts B and C.




Cutting the 3/8" square holes on the bottom of parts F1 and F2 for decorative G & G Ebony plugs.



Here I'm cutting out he reverse cloud on the bottom of part E and cleaning up the band saw marks with a Japanese safty file and sand paper.


Gluing up parts A to B.

Time to cut the width of the boxes or the carcass's top and bottom.



Using the fence and the miter guage to cut the dados for the lock rabbit joints for the box.




Here's the lock rabbit joints. I like using them, their much stronger then just cutting rabbits on the ends of the parts.





Here I'm cutting a 1/4" x 1/4" Rabbit on the rear of the box for the 1/4' Oak plywood backing. I marked the fence to know where to start and end the cut.


I'm placing the door parts inside the the frame to determine the lenght of the parts. I cut the door about a 1/16" under the frame opening. I can plane it down later if it's to wide or to high.

After cutting the door parts to lenght I cut the grove in the stiles and rails by cutting them a little off center and flipping them around using a full kerk blade until I get the desired width for the door panel.
There's a great YouTube video that teaches this titled "Make a quick and simple cabinet door solely on a SawStop by Gregory Paolini.

Using a dado blade I'm cutting the stub tennons. Their approx. 1/4" thick by 1/2" long. Again check out Gregory Pasolini's video.


Here I'm dry fitting the box the and the frame to determine where to place the #20 biscuits that go between the box and the frame. If you zoom in closely you'll see the marks where the biscuits will go.

Marking where to stop cutting with the 3/4' router bit.


I'm cutting away the rear part of the mortise on the door. I draw a line on the fence to know where to stop to avoid taking to much off the rear of the door.



Chiseling out the part that the router bit couldn't get. I placed a shim in the dado to prevent the piece from breaking.


Drilling holes for the shelf pegs.



Now and can use the plate jointer to make the slots for the biscuits on the lines that I marked earlier.
Plate jointers are set up for 3/4" thick lumber so I had to put a shim under it approx. 1/8" thick to center it on the 1/2" pieces.

The same procedure was used on the bottom of the face frame.


I put the dry fitted door into the frame to get a rough idea where the hinges will go. I put shims on the top and bottom of the door to line it up better.



After the box was milled and drilled I can now glue it up.



I forgot to drill the holes for the screws that go into the studs. I use this technique to drill straight holes.

Counter sinking.

Cutting the panel for the rear of the cabinet. I stay to the right of the blade and the plywood when I cut pieces like these in case it gets away.



The rear panel is glued and pin nailed to the rear of the box.


I can spray the inside of the box now. I taped off the part that will be glued.




Here I'm marking for the hinge mortises.

Time for a break. Be right back. 8^}

Starting the mortise with a 3/16" bit with a palm router, staying away from the marks.

The Wood Whisperer has a great video teaching how to make mortises for hinges using this technique.





Finishing the mortise with some sharp chisels. You can see the backer board. It's there to prevent the back of the mortise from splitting.

I got a great fit.






It's time to glue up the door and the face frame.

Here I'm test fitting the hinges to the door and the frame. It's a good fit.






It's time to apply the stain and let it dry.



The hardware I used on this project is from Horton-Brasses. They are solid brass and the color is dark antique.
They are perfect for this application and made to prefection. I choose the dark antque color because this cabinet ia going into a bath room that has cabinets with black arts and crafts style hardware.





After the third coat I sanded it and applyed a forth coat.

Cutting the panel for the rear of the door.

Cutting it to it's final lenght on a sled on the table saw.

The mirror is from Dulless Glass in Verginia. It's 1/4" thick and has a 1-1/4" wide bevel and it's not cheap.






After I applyed a 3/8"+ bead of clear silicone caulking arount the the edges I then installed the rear panel and weighted it down with some hand planes.






It's time to glue the face frame to the box. I used a lot of glue here. If you zoom in you can see the great squeeze out. This is one area where I don't want the glue to fail. It wouldn't be good if someone opened the door and the frame and the door fell on their head. Since the piece is finished it's easy to wipe off the glue before it dries.

Fitting the shelves.


The shelves were built using QSWO.
This is a technique I use to joint boards. I place 2 pieces in the vice with the same grain direction.
Planing the two boards at the same time. I then take the pieces out of the vice and flip them closed. This makes a perfect glue joint.

After gluing I resaw them on the band saw to just over a 1/2". I then plane out the saw marks. This is where the grain direction helps and avoids tear out.


The G & G ebony plugs can be glued in now





The hinges can now be reinstalled along with the knob.


Here I'm installing the plate and magnet on the door and box.

Applying the finish with a detail brush to the ebony plugs.


I placed one of my paintings in front of the mirror. I looks a lot better than my shop wall.
The title of the painting is "Gathering Wild Flowers". It's 30" x 40" oil on canvas.

If anyone wants to build this project and you have any questions please leave them in the comment section below.

I will try to answer them as soon as possible.

I under stand that many of you are master craftsmen and this offer to help is for members who are new to woodworking or the craftsman that specializes in other areas of woodworking.

Thanks for visiting my page.

Gallery

Comments

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I don't know which one I like more, your craftsmanship or your painting!
I wish I can paint something like that!

Such a talented man.
Love it
Cheers
Rasim
 

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3,289 Posts
Very, Very, Nice. I love the building pictures, you have a beautiful design great workmanship and I love 1/4 sawn oak.
 

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You are the machine!

Beautiful design and great writeup. I spent a few minutes with the main photo sequence trying to figure out the beveled glass over one of your printed tiles. Then it hit me, that really should be a mirror since it is a bathroom cabinet. Then it slapped me across the face, it is a mirror! (duh).

I really like your painting abilities, photo-realistic. You are one talented man unit James 8^)
That squeeze out had me worried, glad you caught it in time.
 

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Nicely done, good workmanship.
 

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Beautifully done. Thank you for the details. That oak was a perfect choice.

I too stand to the right when cutting larger plywood. The only thing I don't like is the off button is on the left and I normally turn off my saw with my leg.

I laughed at your "taking a break" figure- although in today's world, should he be holding a phone rather than a book/magazine? ;)
 

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Very nicely fine James. A well crafted cabinet, really like the quarter sawed oak. The details are wonderful front the design to the finishing touches. A great write up with may photo's, thanks for sharing the detailed craftsmanship.
 

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Awesome cabinet and painting!
 

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Great job and beautiful painting. You are very talented
 

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That is quite the post James, I enjoyed every bit of it. Fantastic workmanship. It's a real beauty.
 

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Ye cats, this is gorgeous! I went all the way through this, because I was captivated by the picture. I suspected that it was an art tile, but it being a painting of yours makes it pretty special. Well Done!
 

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Excellent post and the results are fantastic. I love a good blog and this one is very thorough. All the details really bring this together and its a very wonderful cabinet.
I also thought the painting was framed in the piece before I realized its a mirror. You are a talanted painter too.
Thanks for sharing.
 

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Wonderful Work, Story, Presentation, and Painting Sir
QS White Oak was an excellent choice, looks Great!!
 

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Awesome build, write up & photos!
 

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Wonderful. Great write up and pics. Love the project and painting. Thank you for posting…
 

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Many thanks!
Wood Crafter.
Oldrivers.
Ron.
Eric.
Jim Young
J Camp
Mr. Wolf.
Ron star.
TusonTim.

Splinter. Thanks. I used Titebond III. As you know it has a longer work time and I glue up in early morning when the humidity is higher. And the cabinet was finished. Yup it's a mirror. Do you know the remedy for starved joints? Glue-Cosamine. Dad Joke.

Barbara. Thank You. Yes he would be using a cell phone at break and not a book these days but that guy is nuts.

Jerry. Thank You. This was quite a post. Probably my longest or the longest in the history of LJ's. 8^}
It has 85 photos and probably that many typos. Lol

Dark-lightning. Thanks. Yup it's a reflection of my painting in the mirror of the cabinet.
 

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Hah! I just spotted a partial reflection in the bevel glass. I wasn't even drinkin'! 8^D
 

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Barbara. Thank You. Yes he would be using a cell phone at break and not a book these days but that guy is nuts.

- James E McIntyre
Hah! you crack me up! 8^)
 

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Barbara. Thank You. Yes he would be using a cell phone at break and not a book these days but that guy is nuts.

I get it nuts crack. Lol.

- James E McIntyre

Hah! you crack me up! 8^)

- splintergroup
Ha ha you get it! At least someone is following along.

It would be nice if Barbara would chime in. She is very wise and she could help us to get to the bottom of all this. And crack this dilemma.
 

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Yes the Acorn Character is a neat one. Agree, phone today's world. But it's not an internet Cafe either.

James you asked me for a blog about an air line installation. Should have it posted in a bit. That was my project today.
 

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Yes the Acorn Character is a neat one. Agree, phone today s world. But it s not an internet Cafe either.

James you asked me for a blog about an air line installation. Should have it posted in a bit. That was my project today.

- Eric
That would be great Eric. I wish I had a shop like yours. But we do the best with what we are fortunate to have.

Can't wait to see your copper air lines.

Best Regards
Your friend James
 
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