LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner

Project Information

Dec. 26, 2010

After seeing SWIRT's Saw Rack with Balls I decided that I needed to try and make one. However, I needed mine to be more compact and smaller. So here is how I made my Saw Till out of scraps.

It starts with the BODY of the saw till that uses a scrap piece of 2 X 4. I cut a piece 1-3/4 inches wide. I then cut a piece of 3/4 inch piece of plywood 1-3/4 inches wide that would serve as the BACK of the saw till. The wide side of the 2 X 4 is glued to the plywood.



After the glue is set, I laid out the cut lines on the front of the BODY. Refer to the drawing in the 2nd photo above From the left end of the front of the BODY I measured 1-1/8 inches and made the first line. Each subsequent line to the right is 1-1/4 inches apart. I drew as many lines as I wanted places for saws. I then went back and drew a line to the RIGHT of these lines 1/8 inch away from the 1st lines. This is the width of the saw kerf. Extend these lines on the top and bottom of the body of the saw rack as they will help you line up the saw in the next steps.



(Some of the above photos are just mock ups cause I didn't take progress pictures) The above photo does not follow the above description since it is oriented upside down. In the above photo, the top of the body of the saw till is on the lower part of the picture.

I then set a bevel gauge to 22-1/2 degrees and drew a line from the bottom of the 2nd line drawn. This will be the slanted side of the cavity in which a roller will be placed to pinch the saw when inserted.

I then went to the table saw and place this back/body assembly with the BACK up. The 1st cuts were made between the kerf lines laid out. The depth of cut is deep enough to just touch the BACK board or about 1-1/2 inches.

After these initial cuts were made, the miter gauge was set to 22-1/2 degrees and the second cut was made so that the angled line is followed. The trick is to line up the piece so that the blade exits through what will be the bottom of the BODY of the saw till.

What helped me was to make a mark on the table saw top far enough back from the blade so that the wood being cut would not touch the blade. Make these marks to match the sides of 1st cut made in the BODY. This will help you line up the piece. when making some of the angle cuts. Some of the cuts will be made from the wide side of the cavity and the layout lines will help you line up the wood.

After this 2nd cut is made, the triangle waste wood has to be removed and this is done by changing the angle of the miter gage by about 4 degrees LESS than 22-1/2 degrees. Make cuts at this angle for all the slots. Then decrease the angle of the miter gage again by 4 degrees LESS and make another cut. This will have to be repeated about 5 or 6 times.

When the triangular waste has been removed, clean up the cavity with a chisel and sandpaper as necessary.

Next cut a piece of 1/4 inch plywood 1-3/4 inches wide to glue over the FRONT of the body. After the glue is set, cut another piece of 1/4 inch plywood wide enough to cover the back, body and front cover. This will be the TOP of the saw till.

The top cover was then lined up and screwed down. Care must be taken when placing some of the screws where there is little wood between the cavities. Next guide lines were extended from either side of the slot on the bottom of the BODY to the front and top cover.

Since some of the screws that hold the top cover were so close to the slot to be cut, some of the screws had to be removed to prevent any damage to my saw.

I used a japanese pull saw to make the first cut in the front and top cover so that it was even with the straight side of the cavity. Another cut was made beside the first cut so that the resulting slot was just less than 1/8 inch. After all cuts were made, the slots were sanded smooth and straight.



The top was then removed.



The next part is the neat part. What easy to find material could I use for the rollers in the cavity to hold the saws? It had to be something that has some grip to it. SQUIRT used rubber balls. I used 1-1/4 inch long pieces of glue sticks which are about 1/2 inch in diameter. If smaller glue sticks are used, this saw till can be made even more compact. After cutting the glue sticks and sanding their ends smooth ….

NOTE: You could also use 3/8 or 1/2 inch dowels instead of glue sticks. I tried it and it works too.



I placed 1 roller in each cavity.



The top cover was then re-attached.



The finished saw till was mounted on the wall and tested. It worked!

My saw till will hold 14 saws and the total length is about 20 inches long. Notice that all types of saws will hang in this saw till.



Hope this description will help you make a saw till like this.

Gallery

Comments

· Registered
Joined
·
1,517 Posts
That is a great idea, very neat.

Jamie
 

· Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
interesting.
Nice work thanks for posting
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,114 Posts
That is way to cool!
Thank you.
By the way the title made me really laugh. (With no balls).
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

· Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Well done, and thanks for the detailed explanation. The use of glue sticks was very clever.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
Very neat! Glue sticks - who'da thunk it?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
VERY cool, so very very cool! Great project, thanks for the fantastic description too! :)
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
20,131 Posts
TRick!! :))
 

· Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Clever idea. I like it and will have to make one. I (like most, I suppose) am running out of space in my shop and any savings means a lot!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Very nice and an excellent write up as well!

Congrats
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9,309 Posts
way cool !

i'm on it

thanks
 

· Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
My saws keep multiplying. This Christmas I was give the 2 Veritas carcass saws. I need one of these :). I really like the changes you made to the original idea!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Excellent way to make a better mouse trap, or saw rack. Thanks for sharing the detailed instructions.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Need + materials on hand (thanks to your glue stick implementation) + your excellent write-up = no more excuses for me not not get one of these built. Thanks so much for the help.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,043 Posts
Great idea to both of you! I like your improvements too. Looks like it's on my to do list now as well.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I like it Alex but is there any concern over the glue sticks melting in the hot sticky summer? I live in Vegas and it can get to 120 (higher in the garage) so I'm a bit concerned about that myself, not sure what temp the glue melts at, although I believe that I have a bag of them somewhere in the garage that might have lasted a season or two or 7. Will see if I can find them and check their condition before I attempt it. Nice job nice write up!
 
Top