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While working on my box for the box swap I kept having bottles of glue in the way. Once I shipped off the box, I started to clean up my workbench, and discovered over ten bottles of glue, plus a couple bottles of dye and other liquids that really need to be corralled into a single place. So I built a glue caddy.

I started by mitering the corners in some half-inch poplar, using my miter jack and glued the sides onto the bottom (another piece of poplar I had resawed to 3/8" last summer) . Then I cut some dovetailed splines. I cut the splines themselves out of a scrap piece of walnut, then cut the slots for them to match. Glued them in, and started building an insert to separate the various glue bottles and keep them from tipping over. Sawed the splines off flush, broke all the edges with a block-plane, then finished it with a coat of BLO, two coats of platina shellac, and a coat of orange shellac.

Should do the job, and it looks pretty good, I think.

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Very nice looking caddy. Also a good idea to keep it all together. Because who wants to go looking for that small bottle of special glue you cannot remember when or where you used it last?

LOL
 

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Good idea, Dave. I currently keep all of my glue in an old printer paper box. I've been meaning to make a wall hung glue caddy that I can remove and carry into the house when the temperature drops below freezing.
 

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That's a nice piece of work!
 

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Dave you won't get stuck searching for glue with that :) Nice caddy!
 

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The other thing I like about having a caddy is that the small bottle of CA glue I use a lot is top-heavy. It's nearly always tipped over on its side, and I've had it leak out onto my bench a couple times. It's no fun when you discover a puddle of CA glue by putting your hand or a tool down into it.
 

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Very needed tool that most of us never take the time to build. I like the dove tail spline and I bet they were fun to cut by hand on those corners.
 

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Neil, I was almost surprised at how easy they were. Used my 14" carcasse saw, and cutting those dovetails in poplar was like a hot knife in butter. "Am I straight? Oh! I'm DONE!" But it was very satisfying just tapping the splines home to test fit, and thinking they were a little tight. Then they slid in like magic with a little glue to lubricate the process. It was one of the best shop sessions I've had where everything (except one cut of the waste with the coping saw) went just like it's supposed to.

More like that, please!
 

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Very cool! I need to make a caddy ASAP!
 

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That's one good way to keep all the glue in one place. Spilling glue and finding it later all over the place sucks.
You are getting good at those hand cut dovetails Dave and a projects like this are great for trying new things.
 

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Thanks Jim.

Exactly, Dave. Canary yellow TransTint isn't fun to find all over, either.

I'm getting there, the one corner you can't see is the boogery one. And yeah, shop projects are good practice.
 

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Good idea you got there. I know you had fun with this one while you quietly practiced for other things to come.
 

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Thats' a great idea. I'll have to build one myself. Simple design and straight forward construction, couldn't be better. Thanks for inspiring
 

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Dave - Nice work, and quick too. No more knocking over the glue. Now you need a bigger bench to hold all of your tools and your glue caddy.
 

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Thanks, Vernon. Yeah, I have fun learning new tricks.

Joe, the only thing I did that wasn't completely straightforward is that the long sides of the box were 4" stock, while the short sides were 3". So the bottom is only held on two sides (and probably the wrong two if I'm accounting for wood movement), and it just sits in a rabbet. Oh well. If it comes apart this summer in the high humidity, I'll put together another, and have a good reminder to think about wood movement first. But I was using up leftovers from my dovetailing practice poplar.

Earl, I've got a saw till and plane till up next. But the glue caddy takes up about half as much room as all the loose glue bottles, and that's not even taking the spills into account.
 

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Really nice Dave! That thing won't come apart with the splines. I was wondering why there was a gap on the ends. I thought it was a design feature that had a purpose I wasn't aware of.
 

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Naw, Duck. The gap was just due to different sizes of wood on hand. It ended up looking okay that way though. Helps cover up that the bottom wasn't completely square, too.
 

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Nice work Dave, very handy tote. I like the splines, attractive and add strength. These type of quick hand tool projects make for satisfying woodworking, practice time and see the results in completion all in quick secession.

Congrats on the Top 3 award.
 

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Very nice Dave. A good way to keep them all in one place.
 

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Thanks, Dan. Thanks, Tom. I saw someone else do a project with dovetail splines recently, and it looked like the kind of thing I could do pretty easily by hand. This was perfect for trying it out, and it's a useful addition to my bag of tricks. The next couple projects will probably be dovetailed too, as was my box for the swap, so it was nice to try out some different joinery as a palate cleanser.
 
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