LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner

Project Information

I have a relatively small shop. It measures 18 feet long but only 8 feet wide so space is at a premium. When I moved my table saw into the shop, I moved my radial arm saw out. Still, I really cannot fit a free-standing or "permanent" outfeed table in the shop. I have performed a few cuts on the TS when an outfeed table was warranted. It can be difficult at best and even with a blade guard in place, unsafe at worst. In the February 2009 edition of Woodworker's Journal, I saw a fold-down outfeed table that I thought would be great for my shop and I resolved to make it. I decided to make mine the width of the cast iron portion of my saw (42"). The length or depth of the table is dictated by the location of the dust port on the saw. Reason being, when in the fold down position, you don't want the table to interfere with your use of dust collection. The creator of the project was able to get about 30" out of his table. For my saw, the end result is an outfeed table that extends about 26" beyond the cast iron. The design of this TS accessory allows me to quickly set up the table when needed and keep it in the down or folded position when not in use, conserving valuable space.

Let me pause here to say that I often marvel at and feel jealousy toward those woodworkers who stumble upon, trip over or otherwise have free lumber thrust at them from out of the blue. It seems this type of thing always happens to someone else…not me. One Thursday night about 2 months ago, while driving home from work, I saw a butcher block kitchen table out at the curb of my neighbor. He had put it out for trash collection. Without knowing what I would do with it, I parked my car in my driveway, got a small hand truck and brought the table home. For several days I thought about how I might use it when it struck me that I could use the bulk of it as my outfeed table.

The plans in the magazine called for a glue up of two pieces of 3/4" MDF for the core, plastic laminate underneath and on top and hardwood edging to make up the table. The butcher block saved me some work in that it was already about 1 ¾ inches thick, did not require edging and with poly and wax would be plenty smooth enough.
I had to re-calculate the dimensions shown in the plans to take into account no edging and also to accommodate my specific TS. The leg and leg extension are made from poplar I bought for the project (cheaper than maple or oak). The ledge attached to the TS is from oak I had lying around. It is a real hodgepodge of wood species but my need for the fold-down table is temporary. Translated, this means the die has been cast and a considerable shop expansion is pending. Regarding this ledge, the plans call for drilling three holes in your TS cabinet to securely mount the ledge that holds all the weight. Three small carriage bolts do the job. It was painful to drill directly into my TS cabinet but I think I have gotten over it (sob, sob, weep, weep).

Here is a picture of the TS Cabinet before I drilled the holes and attached the ledge.


And here it is after the ledge has been bolted to the cabinet.


The table pivots on two 5" long lag screws that are screwed into a 5 ¾" wide mounting plate that in turn is mounted on the rear rail of the saw. This too required drilling. I drilled 5 holes in the rear rail for lag screws. I laminated two lengths of butcher block to build up the mounting plate to the height of the TS. The leg assembly swings on brackets mounted in the underside of the table.

Here is a shot of the leg assembly in the closed position. I swung it up on top so you can see it. That piece of poplar is not diseased. I struggled to get the hardware placed just right and those are holes I filled after re-locating the hardware to the opposite side. You can also see that I used pocket screws to inset the brackets to the underside of the table.


The extension slides in what amounts to a long dovetail and then is held in place via a heavy duty deadbolt. It took quite a bit of finessing to get the table level while in the locked position. There is a bit of play in the deadbolt and placement is critical to assure a level table. The leg collapses and a second dead bolt holds it in place when the table is folded down.

Here it is in the table up position. You can see the mounting plate with the five bolts holding it to the rear rail. As mentioned above, that is a 5" long lag bolt connecting the table to the mounting plate.


And here in the folded down position. Note that the table is just barely above the DC hose.


The pictures in the zoom area show the slots I routed through the mounting plate and into the table. I first routed them at 3/4" but my miter gauge has a wheel at the bottom leading edge that fits into a slot at the bottom of the miter gauge slots. The wheel is 7/8" wide so I had to widen my routed slots to that dimension. All that's left is to put on a few coats of poly and wax.

I had my neighbor, the one who had put the table out for trash, come over one day and I showed him the project in progress. I asked if he knew what he was looking at. He thought I meant what species of wood and said "maple butcher-block". When I told him it was the kitchen table he had put out for trash, he was happy to learn it was being "recycled". He added that he figured someone would come along and take it. He just didn't expect it to be his neighbor. It's ironic that lumber that might otherwise be taking up space at the landfill is in use and helping me conserve space in my shop!

Gallery

Comments

· Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
Much of my work is less than 24" in length and after going completely through the blade there isn't much room for error to catch the movable roller behind the TS. The motor hanging out the back restricts how close the roller support can get.

I measured multiple times for my fixed TS out-feed table. Use a couple of larger shelf brackets, 3/4" ply and laminate. Routed and aligned the slots perfectly for the sled. Worked excellent for a week. Then tried to rotate blade to 60 degrees and felt resistance in the crank. Root cause was the motor hitting one of the shelf brackets and unable to continue the rotation. I have been restricted to 90 degrees since. (of course I pop riveted the brackets to saw cabinet with stainless steel rivets for good structure)

Bottom line, going to study your fold down and make a design change to mine. Only I need to swing over the motor on one side.

Steve.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Great Job, Nicely Done
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,312 Posts
Great job, I really like the support mechanism you came up with.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
Once again, thanks everyone. BlankMan, in fairness, I didn't come up with the mechanism. I saw it in the magazine mentioned above and like you…liked it!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
Nselimis, I have no concerns. I can't think of any lumber I will push across this table that will be either so large or so thick as to be a weight concern.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
562 Posts
Thanks Lenny.

Been thinking about how to add an outfeed table/support for longer cuts. I have been limping along without an outfeed table and knowing proper support for woodworking is essential for accurate cuts and safety.

I have seen other similar designs. I like the idea of having an outfeed table attached to the back rail, for easy setup and also a nice way to store it. Now I need to get it nearer to the top of my list of things to do.

Thanks again for the photos.

Dalec
 

· Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
cool outfeed table… having just built one (different design) I understand how complicated these can get… very nicely built…
 

· Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
You're welcome dalec. And thank you.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
This is exactly what I was looking for.. and I have that issue of WJ somewhere. Now if only I can find the magazine in time I have my weekend project lined up!

Well executed, thanks for the pics and writeup.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
Thanks Wisty. Necro, good luck finding the magazine and also with the project.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I found my copy of the magazine!

Now that you've had this setup for awhile, would you change anything about the design or your implementation?

Also, does it seem fairly sturdy? I'm sure that nice butcher block is solid but I'm wondering about the outside outer edges flexing since the support is more towards the center.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Nice piece of work Lenny. I just posted my version of the same table. It sure has been handy. I ended up relocating my hardware a time or two as well. I got it close and shimmed the end of the leg to make it perfectly level.

I am using reclaimed kitchen island butcher block for my workbench top. Unfortunately, I didn't get it for free.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Just came across this through another of your projects. The support hinge is just what I had been looking for to use with another project! Thanks for sharing.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
You're welcome dfdye.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,398 Posts
Well I have been holding my outfeed table with a roller at the end until I figured a better way. I have considered telescoping legs and even made one suggested in shopnotes that kind of works.

This idea is much better.

Nice job!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,537 Posts
Nice job Lenny seems you have been with us as long as I have been here well almost .Keep em coming my friend.Alistair
 

· Registered
Joined
·
822 Posts
Lanwater and SCOTSMAN, thanks for the comments. I am curious as to why you are commenting just now, since this was posted about 6 months ago. Did it appear on the LJ home page?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,398 Posts
I think it did.
it does deserve a comment regardless how long it's been posted.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,517 Posts
Great way of creating space.
I do miss a table saw.
 
Top