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Wood And Materials Used
Construction grade southern yellow pine from Home Depot. Titebond III, Harbor Freight quick set epoxy, Briwax
The wife expressed interest in acquiring a new kitchen table. I've wanted to build one for a while, but didn't really have an excuse to do so. Just finished this and she hasn't seen it yet, so I dunno if we'll keep it or if I will end up trying to sell it for enough to get my cost of materials out of it.

Made mostly with construction grade southern yellow pine from Home Depot. I put a small 45 degree chamfer on the top face of the long boards and the inside edge of the breadboard ends.. Not sure if it was a good idea or not. The breadboard ends are attached to the main table with some home brew oak "dominoes", two inches wide by a half inch thick. I routed out the slots with an improvised router jig. The dominoes are all glued into the ends of the long boards, but only the center one is glued into both the main table body and the breadboard. I didn't bother to secure the breadboard ends, though I might yet do some sort of arrangement with a single screw riding in a slot on the underside. The dominoes fit pretty tight, so maybe not necessary. The slots in the breadboard side are 2 1/2 inches wide to allow for the dominoes to move.

The skirt is attached to the legs with some rather half-assed castle joints (these are my first attempt at such a thing. I kind of cheated and laminated the legs up from three thicknesses (two long ones with a shorter one sandwiched in between) so as to only cut the slot for the half-lapped part of the castle joint in one direction, which I then proceeded to screw up. I saw on line where someone did a castle joint with shoulders on the cross members, so I glued some blocks on to create shoulders. I should have made them thinner, like 3/8 inch, I think. They would have looked better. Anyway, they made the joints fit snugly. There's also a threaded insert in each leg with a 3/8-16 bolt and washer securing the skirt assembly to the leg. The whole setup is pretty solid, if a bit ugly. The skirt assembly has five stretchers with slots (to allow for wood movement) in them for pan head 1/4-20 socket head cap screws which I will use to screw the leg/skirt assembly to the table top. Threaded inserts in the table top to receive the screws.

The thing is a beast. Dunno how much it weighs, but it's dang heavy, which is what I wanted. It's just under six feet long and 41-1/2 inches wide, intended to seat six people, two of which are not small (I'm one of 'em.)

I had a time gluing up the table top. I didn't have any bar clamps long enough, so I improvised some out of some 3/4 plywood and wedges. It worked, mostly, though there's one spot where warpage between two boards didn't quite close and there's a tiny sliver where you cans see through. The problem was my wedge setup. I'd get one wedge pounded in tight, then move do another, and the vibration from tightening that one would cause the first one to vibrate loose. It was a game of whack-a-mole and racing the clock against the glue's open time (Titebond III, chosen because of its longer open time), before I finally got all the wedges tight enough.

The top is finished with Tudor Brown Briwax.

Comments

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Sounds like a sturdy construction. I like the stain with the painted base (current trend). You'll have to report back if it lands in your house or if it sells!
 

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Sounds like a sturdy construction. I like the stain with the painted base (current trend). You'll have to report back if it lands in your house or if it sells!
It's going to stay in residence.
 
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