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Project Information

I've recently processed some new wood and prepared a few blanks.

This piece was turned from a crotch blank of what I think is Ash. These blanks are very fresh and green. It developed a crack in the neck while on the lathe. I selected the orientation based on the the three different piths. It is very thin with a wall that is just under 1/8".

I am not certain if I will revisit this piece but originally it was to have a threaded collar of mesquite or sapele and an ash lid and finial. I may follow through on that idea or trunicate it just below the crack or just leave it.

While crotch blanks are very difficult to cut or sand because of the gnarly grain, I really enjoy the results and I am learning so much more about grain and grain direction than I ever thought I possibly could. The crazy grain really pops after I sand it to 600 grit and add a homemade Maloof type finish.

Once cured I then buff with Tripoli which is about 800 -1000 grit followed by White Diamond which is about 1500-1800 grit. I then used Howard's Feed-N-Wax and then followed it by a buffing with carnauba wax. This really brings out the chatoyance of the wood.

It also has a live edge or natural edge.
This piece is 7 1/4" at the tallest and 5 1/4" at its widest point.

Some additional pics of the Erlenmeyer Footed Natural Edge Ash Flask.




and here is another piece I will write up and post soon. It came from the same tree.

Ash Three Footed Natural Edge Vessel.


Thanks for looking-

Gallery

Comments

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i dont know what people are looking at or what they think but im looking at the bottom and how you did those tiny legs ? once again youve amazed me buddy !
 

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That is sweet, very nice turning, excellent job on the little feet. Something I need to try in a turning. The grains really show off. Well done.
 

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Nice work. I always enjoy looking at your projects. I like the shape, the grain, and especially the feet. It's one of those pieces that is "just right".
 

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A little bit Pre-Columbian Primitive a little bit Dr. Frankenstein's laboratory beaker. and from your description a lot of hard work and experimentation. Leave the crack and the ("It's alive") natural edge - they work with this piece - both contributing to the overall look and feel of something both ancient and elegant.
 

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Hello Everyone,
Thanks for the comments.

Pottz~
Thanks! The little feet and legs are fun but they definitely add a lot of work to a piece. It involves leaving extra material then carving and smoothing the bottom. I like them because of how they make the rounded bottom, heavy pieces "float" a bit. Thanks again!

Eric~
I'm having fun with the crazy grain. I have been looking especially for tree limbs with crotches and burls. They are extra work but worth it. Thank you.

EarlS~
Thank you Sir! You once commented on a piece of mine and referred to Grueby, Door and Ephraim. I'm not comparing this piece to those art pottery studio pieces but I really like the clay reference and I'm trying to incorporate more of that pottery feel to wood with my current pieces. Thanks!!!

Leafherder~
I appreciate the comments. I had not seen the Pre-Columbian aspect but certainly picked up on the beaker form. I hadn't thought of Frankenstein though and your comment on the live edge "Its Alive!" made me laugh. The crack in the neck now reminds me of neckbolts and forehead scars. For me, the cracks add a certain character to the piece.
Thank you!
 

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There is much to look at on this flask. Grain everywhere, cracks, bark, edges. The work gives off the talent of the turner. Again those feet are a nice touch.
 

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Little feet! I like 'em! Very nice work, Jon!

I'm normally not a huge fan of live-edge, but the live-edge neck on this strikes me right. Well done!
 

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That looks like a difficult turning, good work! How long did it take to get the feet on it?
 

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Absolutely gorgeous and love the foot design
 

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Very nice. Love the color and the feet.
 

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Dave~
Thanks for the wonderful compliment. I am trying to keep all of those "features" in place and in balance when I can.

Dave~
I am having a lot of fun with the feet. I thought the live edge on the thin neck might work well and I'm happy with the way it came out.
Thanks!

John~
Thank you. The hollowing is still new to me so there is a bit of difficulty. A good, strong, dovetailed tenon that matches my chuck helps with that. The feet do add a lot of extra time and work. Probably a good third of the time involved in the piece goes into carving and shaping the feet and then sanding it to the contour of the rest of the piece.

Phil~
Thank you. I really like the form of this one too.

Wayne~
Thank you Sir. This one has some great grain and tone and the feet really set it off. I did not want the finish to change the tone of the wood too much, just make the grain pop. I'm pretty happy with the results.
 
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