LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.

Project Information

This is my first attempt of making an end grain cutting board made of walnut with maple inlays. It is mostly made on my homebuilt CNC. The inlays are made from solid maple blocks, because I did not want any visible seams in the inlays. Therefore I had to split the pattern into smaller segments and glue them in two runs. The slope on the side of the inlays made the walnut/maple seams practically invisible.

There are a few more pictures at my blogspot if you are interested:
https://maskinkonst.blogspot.com/

Gallery

Comments

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,555 Posts
Cool!

Great idea with the tapers, just like veneer inlays only on steroids. Unlimited design potential!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
THAT IS A BEAUTY!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
28,565 Posts
nice work,love that inlay design.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,478 Posts
sure is purdy, nice design,
rj in az
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,289 Posts
That is really cool!!!!!!!!!!!

Cheers, Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51,858 Posts
Great looking board. Nice job on the inlays.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Very elegant pattern, well done. Is this board strictly ornamental or will it be subjected to moisture/water when used/washed? I ask due to the differential movement of end grain v what appears to be face grain (maple). Seems like a high potential for checking/cracking. Has this technique been successful for you in the past? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Hi, I am glad you like the board! This is my first cutting board with inlays, so I do not have any real 'field experience'. It was a present to a relative that got married this past weekend, I really hope they will use it for cutting.
The maple is actually also oriented with the end grain up, the same direction as the walnut base. I hope that minimizes the risk for cracking. Thanks for pointing it out, I will look out for any such problems.

//Henrik

Very elegant pattern, well done. Is this board strictly ornamental or will it be subjected to moisture/water when used/washed? I ask due to the differential movement of end grain v what appears to be face grain (maple). Seems like a high potential for checking/cracking. Has this technique been successful for you in the past? Thanks.

- kaetamer135
 
Top