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Project Information

I decided to build an actual dust collection for my tablesaw and jointer. I used some scrap 4" PVC pipe. I cut into the pipe about 1" deep. Then I took it into the kitchen and heated it up on the stove (of course I waited until the wife wasn't home!). I slowly heated it and bent one tab at a time (be careful because the PVC can burn easily). How're I realized that the pipe wanted to go back to being straight when hot. So when I bent one tab, I had to go back and bent a few tabs before. Once everything was close to being completely bent, I heated the whole pipe and put some weight on it to let it cool with the tabs fully bent. I screwed it to the plywood enclosure I made and caulked it to make it completely air tight. It took me about 2 hours to build two of them.

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1,454 Posts
An interesting project and one I would not have thought of. Would something like this worked?
 

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3,385 Posts
Sorry I have to ask, but can you show a picture of where you used it on the dust collector?
 

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179 Posts
I usually cut little 1/2" or whatever pieces off
of a coupling and glue to both sides of a exact
size hole, nice clean look and it will still swivel
if need be. Not sure of your application though.
Yours looks good to me, Nice job.



 

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First of all, this project isn't supposed to be posted in this section as it contains no wood.

Second of all - THIS IS HIGHLY DANGEROUS!!!!!!!!! PVC, when burned outgases compounds including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and hydrogen chloride. Don't Do This!!
 

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It worked well for me. You don't actually burn the PVC. You heat it up until it reaches the glass transition temperature, which is only 176F. I experienced no fumes or any off gases created in the process. The connection is mounted to a plywood enclosure I made for my grizzly tablesaw. I cut out a whole and slide it in.
 

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Great idea! I heat weld and melt PVC for a lot of projects such as bows. A heat gun would work better!
 

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It looks like a great adapter.

You heated well above 176 F based on the burned areas. If I were going to do this I would do it outside and be upwind.

It would be better to not do this in a living space and especially not where you prepare food. I think it is better to be safe and not take risks with these type of toxic gases.
 

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You can get a metal starter from Lowe's for less than $10.00 and you will not have to go through such a process and take a chance on burning the PVC.
 

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Scott, I think your idea is very innovative and it worked for your needs.
I needed to expand some PVC to fit on some China made fittings, so with the heat gun and a chuck off of the lathe, I was able to soften it and expand the pipe just enough…
I too would like to see how you used this creative flange.
 
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