LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.

Project Information

This serving board is a little simpler than the last one. I started out making a very basic cutting board but just couldnt keep from adding more details as I went along. Its an illness :)
I find that making these is a good way to try out new ideas and hone my basic shop skills. If I dont like the results then I still have learned something. And it makes some very pretty kindling.
I use lacquer on these types of boards and oil on cutting boards.

Gallery

Comments

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
That's an interresting board! What are the dimensions? Wonderful inlay and banding technique!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,967 Posts
The detail is really eye catching. Nice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,983 Posts
Beautiful and exacting work!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,431 Posts
Nice to see you doing something so simple, Andy. LOL…NOT!

Terrific job….really eye-catching!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,890 Posts
don't take anything for that illness…. the side effects are amazing!! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,182 Posts
Looks like you're on a roll with inlays. Very nice work Andy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56,015 Posts
Very nice the combination of the woods you used really make this pop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,351 Posts
That is just stunning. I am impressed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,500 Posts
Great board. How long does it take you to make one of these?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
322 Posts
Very sharp! Can you provide some instruction as to how you did the inlays? Specifically the ones on the corner. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,728 Posts
Thanks guys and gals!
Here is a little more on the details:

The dimensions are about 3/4" x 10" x 16".The body is eastern Maple.The inlays are Wenge,Walnut and Vermillion.Since they are end grain they show better with a lacquer finish since oil wood darken them.The stripes are Purple Heart,Jatoba,Walnut and Maple.

The short horizontal stripes are done on only part of the Maple body, and then ripped,glued back together with the full length stripes and and then kerfs are cut about 3/8" deep for the full width cross grain stripes.The inlaid diamonds are done using the benchtop mortiser.The fence isnt moved,only the chisels are changes in size,that way the center line stays the same.The corner stripes are simply kerfs cut at a 45 on the table saw with the blade up about 3/8". I rip strips and run them through my Makita 12" planer.

I am not sure how long it takes to make one of these me since I work on one over several weeks when I have time .Way too many hours. I spend more time laying out and erasing lines than cutting anything.If I made another one exactly the same it would probably take about 2 hours,not counting the glue drying.
Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,452 Posts
There ya go again!! showin' off! It really is wonderful, Andy. I like it a lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
The flow on this one is very nice. Really fun looking piece of work and excellent workmanship. Two thumbs up.
Gary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,592 Posts
Really nice - hopefully no one will ever put a knife on it, that would be a shame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
Fantastic boards! And I'm very appreciative of the description of your technique. I was just about to ask when I looked down further and you explained how you did it. I can't wait to see more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,728 Posts
I have recieved several questions from fellow Jocks regarding the best way to do the diamonds.
Here are some things I have figured out the hard way.
The sharper the chisels are the better.Also the out side faces must be flat and square to each other.By the way the chisels I use are std Jet brand.
The tear out is definitely a problem and with some woods more than others.
Tip:I stick with wood with an even grain pattern for the mortises,not swirly,regardless of specie.Not only do all woods cut differently,but each piece does too.
Pine and Mahogany,Wenge chip or crush pretty bad.
Tip:I start by punching a few holes in each wood to see how smooth it cuts and if its not suited for holes then I will use it for the plugs.
Tip:Try wetting the surface with a damp rag just prior to boring,this works great for Maple before running through a planer too.
Tip:After positioning your piece to be mortised,slip a scrap of 1/4'' mdf under the chisel.Plywood will help but isnt near as good as mdf.This really helps cut smooth shoulders, and prevents crushing in most woods.Also,lift the chisel slowly back out of the cut, as thats is when the top edges of the mortise chip off too_Often I will double stick down the mdf backer when working with brash woods.
Tip: One last thing is to use thicker lumber so you can run the entire board through a thickness planer.This is a great way to clean up those chipped edges and crushed fibers that still show up on occasion.Amazingly,the diamonds set at opposing directions fair pretty well.
I make my plug stock to fit after I am done punching holes.I cut them slightly over size on the table saw and then bring them down to size with the thickness planer making very shallow passes,and finally dress them on old sanding belts glued to a piece of melamine.I make the plugs about 12'' long,then I taper the bottom edges of each plug on the sandpaper,that way,when I tap them, they wont damage the edges of the mortise.I glue the hole,not the pin.I use a small artists or acid brush to apply a thin even coat to all inside surfaces and make sure I dont get a pool of glue in the bottom,which would prevent the plug from going in all the way.I then use a fine tooth saw to cut off the plug stock,then repeat the process.This way I dont wind up with excess glue on the plug stock.
Tip: Check the plug for a tight fit prior to glueing.If it has even a slight gap on any of the four sides,cut off a section and check further up the stick.Putty isnt really a viable option.You will see it stand out it in this type of flat work where the eye is drawn right to each joint.
Hope this helps and I look forward to seeing your creations.
Andy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
Oh Boy!!!!
If I could only….......
Words have failed me.
Wonderful
 
Top