LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.

Comments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,109 Posts
The woods harmonize well in the second and third pix but in the first picture the grain in the outside pieces does not (in my opinion) go well with the grain of the interior pieces. The looks is similar to combining flat sawn (the outside pieces) with edge sawn (the interior pieces). This combination creates (for me) a conflict.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Thx for your answer MonteCristo, I'm take note of this. I'd asked myself that just before I'd glued the board and make a try.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,024 Posts
For your first boards, I'd say they look "darn" good! I have made a couple boards myself and believe me, when you give one of these to someone, they WILL love it.

I do sand the "heck" outta mine though and get them as smooth as glass and finish with a food safe mineral oil. In my few attempts, I'm just trying to get a good glue-up and a useable board. I'm a long way from intricate designs but it's lingering on the horizon. LOL

Keep on doing what you are doing and the boards will get better each time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,109 Posts
Hi SebLolo :

You are welcome. Combining woods of really different colors is another thing to experiment with. There are some excellent examples on this forum by guys like Degoose. I would start wuith just strips of various woods to start. Some of the cutting boards you'll see here are quite complex glue-ups. I'd start with something a bit simpler and work your way up. Good glue joints is an issue in some of the complex designs. If the board is actually going to be used and washed, it's important to remember that any glue joint involving endgrain is a lot weaker that a joint that has no endgrain in it (so-called long grain to long grain joint) - endgrain joints may fail after a bunch of washings. Also, a board that will be washed should be assembled with a "waterproof" glue like Titebond III - even then the board should not be left immersed in (dish)water (unless you use epoxy).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,179 Posts
Beautiful wood and boards Seb!
 
Top