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Looks like it will serve the purpose. Nice looking chisels.
 

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Nice home for a nice set of chisels!
 

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Great storage box. Very nice.
 

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A really nice box for your chisels.
 

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Great box build Jwoodcraft.

Those are fine chisels. What sizes are they?

I always wondered what happens when you sharpen them down below the flutes on the backs?

Or are they so hard that that won't happen.
 

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Great box build Jwoodcraft.

Those are fine chisels. What sizes are they?

I always wondered what happens when you sharpen them down below the flutes on the backs?

Or are they so hard that that won't happen.

- James E McIntyre
The chisels are 42mm to 3mm- a pretty standard set of sizes.

For wider chisels and plane blades, upon sharpening down to the hollow(s) on the back, you carefully hammer on the bevel side, expanding the softer steel body, and actually bending down the thinner hard steel layer that forms the cutting edge (which is then flattened w/ stone). This is called 'tapping out'- rather nerve wracking. On the narrower chisels, normal sharpening of the back usually stays ahead of the hollow.

Cheers, Jay
 

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Nicely done box for a nice set of chisels. Looks great.
 

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Looks great. Careful with the cedar touching the iron. That is a recipe for rust.
 

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Looks great. Careful with the cedar touching the iron. That is a recipe for rust.

- swirt
I know, I realized that while the project was underway, but the parts that touch the chisels are mahogany so it seems OK. Would use another wood in hindsight.
 

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Looks great. Careful with the cedar touching the iron. That is a recipe for rust.

- swirt
I agree the chisel storage looks great.

I hadn't heard about a problem of cedar causing rust. Other than the wood serving as a reservoir for water, it appears from this http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/journals/conservation-journal/issue-04/corrosion-of-metals-associated-with-wood/ that cedar and jarrah are particularly acidic.

Does anyone know how much of a problem this is? Does it need to be dripping wet to matter? If dry, is this a problem of hours, days, years or centuries? I've certainly seen black stains from wet oak and steel, but I'm curious about steel and wood in the absence of liquid water.
 

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Great box build Jwoodcraft.

Those are fine chisels. What sizes are they?

I always wondered what happens when you sharpen them down below the flutes on the backs?

Or are they so hard that that won't happen.

- James E McIntyre

The chisels are 42mm to 3mm- a pretty standard set of sizes.

For wider chisels and plane blades, upon sharpening down to the hollow(s) on the back, you carefully hammer on the bevel side, expanding the softer steel body, and actually bending down the thinner hard steel layer that forms the cutting edge (which is then flattened w/ stone). This is called tapping out - rather nerve wracking. On the narrower chisels, normal sharpening of the back usually stays ahead of the hollow.

Cheers, Jay

- jwoodcraft
I looked up how to repair the hollows and this is what I found.
 

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Great box build Jwoodcraft.

Those are fine chisels. What sizes are they?

I always wondered what happens when you sharpen them down below the flutes on the backs?

Or are they so hard that that won't happen.

- James E McIntyre

The chisels are 42mm to 3mm- a pretty standard set of sizes.

For wider chisels and plane blades, upon sharpening down to the hollow(s) on the back, you carefully hammer on the bevel side, expanding the softer steel body, and actually bending down the thinner hard steel layer that forms the cutting edge (which is then flattened w/ stone). This is called tapping out - rather nerve wracking. On the narrower chisels, normal sharpening of the back usually stays ahead of the hollow.

Cheers, Jay

- jwoodcraft

I looked up how to repair the hollows and this is what I found.


- James E McIntyre
There are quite a few videos on Youtube showing the process. I have only done it on plane blades- IME one spends a long time to get very slight result. Japanese chisels are a bit more fussy, but I end up only using western ones for rough carpentry, where you might hit a nail, and for scraping glue.
 

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I hadn t heard about a problem of cedar causing rust. Other than the wood serving as a reservoir for water, it appears from this http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/journals/conservation-journal/issue-04/corrosion-of-metals-associated-with-wood/ that cedar and jarrah are particularly acidic.

Does anyone know how much of a problem this is? Does it need to be dripping wet to matter? If dry, is this a problem of hours, days, years or centuries? I ve certainly seen black stains from wet oak and steel, but I m curious about steel and wood in the absence of liquid water.

- AlanWS
From personal experience, it doesn't take more than a few weeks and sometime less.
A few anecdotal pieces of evidence:
1) I built a file divider out of cedar. Found rust on the files within a month. Probably happened in shorter time than that, but just didn't notice it.
2) built a saw rack with a bunch of mixed scraps, found some rust after a few weeks on my saws that didn't make sense. Looked closer at the rack… the rust spots corresponded with the cedar scraps.
3) left a cedar offcut on the my bandsaw table. Had rust in the exact shape of the offcut within a week.

In all three cases, the wood was not wet, but I do live in a humid area so the humidity may be some factor.
 
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