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January 2016 we started building on a new house (and a new workshop) and my focus until recently has been as the general contractor, trades person and labourer during construction.

The house and workshop are almost done and this is the first woodworking project I have tackled in two years.

In September 2018 I had the opportunity and pleasure to spend two weeks at the Canadian School of French Marquetry operated and taught by LJer Paul Miller (Shipwright).

The two courses Boulle Style Marquetry and Painting in Wood were fabulous. As a novice at marquetry my skills have increased by several orders or magnitude.



Prior to taking the course my marquetry attempts were done using a fret saw and the double bevel method .

The course included an introduction to and use of the chevalet de marquetry.

I committed to building one when I returned home.

I built my chevalet out of 3/4" oak veneer plywood using the plans provided by Paul. Paul has written extensively on Lumber Jocks about building a chevalet (both projects and blogs).

I veneered the plywood side grain with oak veneer. The saw frame, foot pedal and camp assembly are built from Walnut. I added an upholstered seat using the finest faux crocodile I could find.

I'm looking forward to using my chevlaet in the new year.

Gallery

Comments

· Premium Member
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Looking forward to seeing some more fine marquetry from your new addition.
 

· Registered
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Absolutely BEAUTIFUL! What I want to do when I grow up!! The whole process fascinates me. Just building a Chevalet would be wonderful.
 

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Cool tool with amazing results.
 

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Very interesting device…both, from woodworking and engineering point of view.
 

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Good work. I so want to take those courses with Paul this year. Been accumulating wood for my Chevy for several years.
 

· Registered
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Schwieb - I highly recommend Paul's courses. In addition to using the chevlaet you will learn how to: prepare the veneer packet both form Boulle Marquetry and Painting in wood, learn about and use hot hide glue: how to prepare a mounting board and placing you veneer pieces on to the board, a short introduction to french polich., practice hammer veneering. We had some free time so he even showed us some parquetry using Louis cubes. Whether or not you end up making a chevalet does not matter. The marquetry skills you will learn can be used now matter how you decide to actually cut the pieces (fret saw, scroll saw etc.)

He is a generous and very knowledgeable instructor and will spend whatever time is needed with you and freely share
his knowledge and skill. Plus, Vancouver Island is a beautiful place to visit.
 

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Yes they are amazing working pieces of art! I still remember a visit to Pauls place a few years ago and being able to try one of these funny looking machines, and of course Shipwright's shop is one most of us will only dream of!
Yours looks great! The seat has some padding I hope?
 

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That's one beautiful project, and as Andre said and I thought the first minute I saw it, and was thinking of the many hours of fun you'll have with it, more padding please. LOL
I know nothing just my $.02
 

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Very impressive Peter.. I will start making use of mine in 2019.
Will you saw your own veneers?
Jim
 

· In Loving Memory
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Peter , nice job and congratulations on your 'Daily Top 3' award.
 

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Sorry I missed this Peter. You managed to post it the day I was admitted to hospital in Tucson with screaming pancreatitis. Unfortunately when I finally got back to checking forums a few days later, I managed to miss this one.
Thank you for the kind comments and course reviews. You were a great student and your projects were very well done.
Your chevy looks amazing as well. No one would ever suspect it was plywood.
Now let's see some fine marquetry!
 
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