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Project Information

I can only use 6 pictures to try and illustrate the steps in making these so you may have to read between the lines and make some assumptions. So:
Start with as square of a blank as you can and number the sides 1 2 3 4. I usually do these on my table saw but thought I would try one with a miter saw, seemed to work ok. Depending on the length of your blank and the desired placement of the knots-set a stop to the left of the blade and (I) set my blade to 30 you can use less of an angle or more of an angle to make the knots skinny or wide. 30 is just my personal preference and I think it makes an attractive sized knot-YMMV What you are going to do is make a cut and glue an inlay in and put the blank back together. Start with "1" facing up and make your first cut- see picture 2 wait an appropriate amount of time and make second cut with side "3" facing up, glue another inlay in and clamp it up, now you should have an "X" see picture 3. When enough time has allowed your second glueup to set, unclamp your blank and put side "2" facing up and repeat the cut and inlay glueup - see picture 4 After that has set turn the blank to side "4" and do the dance one more time. Your blank should look like this now-see picture 5. Let the glue cure (I let it go overnight) and you are ready to turn it. See turned blank, I glued ends on so I could drill them out for salt and pepper shakers. I hope this has made the process a little more clear and not added to the confusion…
Regards, Dave

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Comments

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Thanks for the explanation, it does seems like a long setup, but the results are impressive for turnings.
 

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Thanks for taking the time to detail the process. I really want to try a celtic knot project this winter.

Thanks for posting.

Bill in MI
 

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Thanks for posting this tutorial.

If you want to add more photos, you can put them in with the text.
 

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Yes Eric, it is kind of fiddly, and the wait times between glueups makes it kind of an ordeal….(doing more than one at a time helps). But after you get your blank finished and start to turn it and you see the knot developing, I guarantee it will bring a smile to your face.
 

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Thanks Chuck, I wasn't aware of that, good tip.
 

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Best explanation I ve seen yet! Thanks for posting.

- northwoodsman
Thank you very much northwoodsman, I appreciate it,
 

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Nice, I'm pretty sure I'll try it. I have VERY little experience on a lathe but I have a LOT of time
 

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Looks great! Have you tried one yet with sides 1 and 3 having the white insert, and sides 2 and 4 having the dark one?

Claude
 

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Thanks for posting the how to. Nice work.
 

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Looks great! Have you tried one yet with sides 1 and 3 having the white insert, and sides 2 and 4 having the dark one?

Claude

- ClaudeF
Thanks! I've thought about doing that for a decorative effect on something like a mallet handle…..I kept these all one color because they are for salt and pepper shakers.

Thank you Ron
 

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Great instruction, you've made it easy to follow. Just not sure what to do without a lathe? Nope not another slippery slope. :)

It actually seems like the woodworking part is quick and easy, all the time is waiting for glue to dry.
 

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Great instruction, you ve made it easy to follow. Just not sure what to do without a lathe? Nope not another slippery slope. :)

It actually seems like the woodworking part is quick and easy, all the time is waiting for glue to dry.

- therealSteveN
Thank you Steve. You are correct in thinking this is quick and easy, it is. Each knot is just four cuts on a chop saw. Doing multiple glue ups helps the time go by quicker. Waiting between glueups IS the hard part.
Keep your eye out for a used lathe, a midi or even a mini will provide a lot of enjoyment.
 

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Thanks for the tutorial, Dave! I'd looked at a bunch of them and thought I had it figured out, but I haven't gotten around to actually trying it yet. This might push me over the edge. Thanks!
 

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Go for it Dave! You could use one of your awesome turning saws.
Thanks for the tutorial, Dave! I'd looked at a bunch of them and thought I had it figured out, but I haven't gotten around to actually trying it yet. This might push me over the edge. Thanks!

- Dave Polaschek
 

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That is a sweet looking set there.
 
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