LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.

Project Information

I recently completed my new workbench. It is a split-top, Roubo-inspired design with a few tweaks. It's made from construction-grade lumber and with the hardwood for the vice chops and the vise hardware, came in under $650. It is 5" long, 35" high, and 30" wide. It has a 5" wide well board set off center, giving me a wider work surface on the face-vise side. The face vise is a twin-screw Series 2 from Hovarter Custom Vise. The twin screw vise has no screws, just plain shafts that slide in and out freely when the vise is not tightened down, but joined by a linkage under the bench that allows you to tighten and untighten the vise by turning only one of the handles. It's 25" from shaft center to shaft center and the chops are 33" long, 7" high, and 2" thick. The end vise is a Groz. I know it doesn't have a leg vise or a sliding deadman like a plate 11 bench, but it was more important to me to be able to clamp up 24" wide panels to cut joinery on the end grain, and the Moxon-style front vise lets me do that. With chops that are 33" long, I can hold just about anything I work on securely. If I need support for longer pieces, I can simply clamp it to the other leg.

The legs are joined to the top with wedged tenons. I "built" these joints up a la David Barron. But I didn't bother to dovetail the front tenons, it just seemed like too much trouble and once the wedges were driven, I don't think they're going anywhere. The legs are tripled up, laminated 2×4s. The stretchers and bearer boards are doubled up laminated 2×4s. There is one set of 3/4" dog holes running the length of the bench from the end vise. There is also a piece of t-track set into the bench 3/4 of the way down to assist in using it for assembly (my shop is too small for separate benches), for which I use some of the wonderful Kreg Automaxx bench clamps and other hold-downs that work with t-track.

Since these photos were taken, the bench has gotten a light sanding and four coats of Arm-R-Seal. A complete walkthrough showing the construction and features is available on my YouTube channel.

This was one helluva project. Wow. Two months of my life basically consumed by a workbench! Many, many hours spent getting it flat. I also had to mill the vise chops by hand since they were too big for my 6" jointer. Great workout and I got to know a couple new planes I picked up at WWIA very well, and they got to know my sharpening stones very well too! The Hovarter vise ran me $375, the Groz end vise cost $70. The maple for the vise chops cost me $80. So all of the rest cost me approx. $100, which includes a gallon of Titebond, a quart of Arm-R-Seal and a whole bunch of 3/8" dowels. I've got to give shouts out to Paul Sellers whose series of videos on making a workbench were invaluable to me; Chris Schwartz, whose book on workbench design, theory, and construction was the key to the door; and David Barron who saved me hours chopping mortises for the legs. I hope you guys enjoy these pictures and the video.

Gallery

Comments

·
Registered
Joined
·
694 Posts
Looks great! Did you use standard 2×4's, kiln dried or 'regular'?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Looks great! Did you use standard 2×4 s, kiln dried or regular ?

- siavosh
Thank you! They were all kiln-dried 2×4s. Some were wetter than others though so I bought them all and stacked them up in the shop for about 4 months before milling them down, then let them sit for a week or so between milling and the laminations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,586 Posts
You should visit the Workbench of your dreams thread and post it there. This will be a great inspiration to those on a budget and are looking to build a bench, like me..
Thanks for the video and link on the bench also. it cleared up all the questions I had.
I bookmarked this for future reference.
Thanks for posting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,085 Posts
Great looking bench-I'm sure you'll get a lot of good use out of it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,706 Posts
Thats got to be the best shot of a happy wood worker I have seen in some time.

Looking at the bench its no wonder !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,966 Posts
Looks great. We built a 2X6 Roubo last year on the video-cast, but a split top version is great to see too!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Great work, I'd never considered 2 xs for a bench. Looks like I've got my winter project. Thanks for posting
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,205 Posts
Well done, congrats on the new bench.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,379 Posts
Great looking bench. When I saw the "budget friendly", then saw $650, I thought "How is $650 budget-friendly?" Then I saw that the majority of it was spent on vises, which could be easily replaced with a more budget-friendly alternative.

Nice build!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,103 Posts
Congratulations! It looks like sterling workmanship and judging by the smile on your face the time it took to build was well spent. I'm sure you will get a lifetime of pleasure from this bench.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Great Looking work bench. After I get my shop organized, maybe I can find out how to build one and have space for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Thanks man! Yeah it's still a lot of money, but when I did the math to see what it would cost to do the whole thing out of hard maple, my definition of "budget" changed! I couldn't bring myself to compromise on the front vise hardware though-it was exactly what I looked a long time to find and pretty much the main reason I wanted to build a bench. Totally agree, you could build this bench with cheaper vise hardware and chops and probably stay under the $200 mark.

Great looking bench. When I saw the "budget friendly", then saw $650, I thought "How is $650 budget-friendly?" Then I saw that the majority of it was spent on vises, which could be easily replaced with a more budget-friendly alternative.

Nice build!

- BinghamtonEd
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Thanks, Stumpy! Of course, I forgot to add a shout-out to you for that series, which I did watch in its entirety prior to designing and building mine and would most certainly recommend it to anyone out there thinking of building a roubo on a budget!
Looks great. We built a 2X6 Roubo last year on the video-cast, but a split top version is great to see too!

- StumpyNubs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,202 Posts
Cool looking vise… never seen anything like it.
 
Top