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Workshop Information

Location
United States
My shop is my family's two car garage. It doubles as both a wood shop and a mechanics shop. For 20 years I was an aircraft mechanic in the US Navy, and no matter how much I try, the tinkering mechanic rises to the surface. It could be the garden tractor, any of my cars or a family member's car, or my Honda GoldWing that I work on.

Because of the fact that my shop serves two purposes, most of my wood working equipment is mobile. I have a Craftsman 113.29991 table saw that I acquired from my father-in-law who got it from his father. I have used several different saws in both high school and at numerous military base hobby shops and do not long for anything when it comes to the way this saw performs: it is a saw that I plan to pass on to one of my sons when I am no longer able to use it. I have enlarged the table surface to 3' X 4' by building a router table onto the right wing of the saw table. At the time that I took ownership of this saw it came with a rip fence that did not function correctly. I could not afford a Beismeyer or other equivalent rip fence so I turned to the library where I found a book that provided instructions on building a rip fence from plywood. This rip fence is more than I expected from a few pieces of plywood.

In addition to the table saw, I have a DeWalt Power Shop 925. I would put this saw up against ANY power miter saw. There are critics out there that talk down on a radial arm saw and claim that a power miter saw if far superior: I disagree. This saw came to me by way of my father who had bought it for $100.00 at a local auction. He didn't use it, and I had a need for it: his loss, my gain.

I have a Powr-Kraft lathe that I really would like to use more than I do. All of my other tools all type of an older model Craftsman: Craftsman Scroll Saw, Companion Drill Press, Craftsman Bandsaw, Craftsman Planer, Craftsman Jointer and Dunlap Sander. I guess the most impressive part of my shop is that I have only spent approximately $250.00 for all of my tools.

If you notice, most of my tools have a certain age to them. That describes one of my other wood working hobbies: old woodworking machines. Just because it is old, doesn't mean it has to be replaced. I have started the restoration of most of my Craftsman tools and that is documented in my blog. At some point I will be finished working ON the tools and begin working WITH the tools, but for now, this is just as fun. It isn't much, but it is all I need. I guess the only real problem I have is that I have to allow my wife to park her car in it.

Gallery

Comments

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Thanks for the description, Brian. I am looking forward to seeing your pictures.

I will be honest with you if I asked my wife to park her truck out in the weather so I could work in the upper garage I will guarantee you that I would be out in the weather before her truck is. :)

Thanks for sharing.
 

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Looking forward to seeing some pictures.
 

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Looks like your off to a good start on that shop. No one is better suited to fit all those activities into a limited space than a swaby. I look forward to seeing your projects and shop organization as it evolves. Welcome aboard.
 

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Brian,

Thanks for the pictures. You have a nice shop space and some vintage but nice tools to work with. I really like your customization of the table saw. Building your own fence was an innovative solution to its lack of a proper fence.

Thanks for the shop tour. I really appreciate it.
 

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Nice pic'a and shop.
 

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Great post Brian.
My tools are all vintage or almost vintage.

If you still know the title of the book you got the plans for the rip fence I could use it. I need a fence for my saw and can't afford to by one, I am not opposed to building my own.
 

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I don't know how I missed this one!

I like older tools, too, especially Craftsman table saws. I have two. A 10-incher that I recently restored (you commented on my project for that one, brian, I should have come here then) and an 8-incher that I was going to pass on to my brother. The only reason my brother doesn't have it yet is that the fence is in bad shape.

The fence has been a real problem on most of these old Craftsman saws. I would also be interested in the book where you got the inspiration for this fence design. I would consider making this a winter project, fixing up my old saw for my brother and doing a detailed blog on the construction for any other old Craftsman saws out there.
 

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I thought I had the cover of the book but saddly I only copied certain pages of the book. I am pretty certain that the title is "Shop Tested Woodworking Tools You Can Make." It is a book from the editors of Wood Magazine. Good luck!
 

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Thanks! I got most of what I needed from your pictures. Always one to tinker, I rarely follow the plans exactly anyway :) I see how the adjustment screws work to adjust how square the fence is to table. This looks like a good, solid design, inherently self-squaring, unlike other homemade fence designs I have seen.

What I can't see is how the clamping mechanism works. It looks to me like the clamp works in the center of the "T" that keeps the fence square on the inside (closest to the saw table) of the square wooden rail that the fence rides on. How does that work? Is there a small push rod that causes the clamp to rotate around a pivot point? I don't see any obvious pivot point like a bolt or screw through the fence.

I'll think on this a while. If all else fails, I'll order the book, Amazon has it used.
 

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You got it! The clamp lever is actully cut with a cam that as you press the lever down it moves an internal push rod in the T that forces the locking lever to pinch the fence to the wood that is attached to the angle iron. The pivot point is cut into the cennter piece of the T. The only harware that goes through the fence is the bolt that attaches the lever to the fence. Hope this helps.
 

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Sure does! I see how it all fits together now. Watch for this in the future. Tonight I'll go out and dig through the scrap bin. Damn! the saw still needs new arbor bearings (a new arbor for that matter), etc, etc. Ahh, the things we do for family. I might have this done for Christmas!
 
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