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Project Information

My wife and I got into keeping honeybees this year. Pictured is a new hive that I've built to accommodate a new group of bees that I will possibly get when my present bees swarm in the spring, due to crowding in their existing hive.

The first picture shows the complete hive with all it components assembled.

The next one is the hive stand.

The next is the hive stand with the screened bottom board, which provides ventilation and pest management.

The following one is with a hive body added. In this box are inserted the "frames" which will contain the honey comb which the bees build upon them.

Next, the hive with hive bodies, which has (24) frames - (8) per hive body.

Next is the hive with the inner cover installed.

The first picture shows the final component in place and that is the telescopic outer cover with an aluminum top to protect the hive from rain.

For a few more pictures of what these "frames" look like when they have bees on them, here's a link to another post.

Thanks for looking!

Gallery

Comments

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Very cool Tom
 

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Great job Tom, I eat honey all the time the very best sugar you can have
 

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Thanks, Jim!
 

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Tom that looks a really well made wee unit.
Folk don't appreciate bees enough.
Beeswax goes on everything I make. :)

Jamie
I Rainy Scotland
Watching trees growing
 

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GMman,

My bees worked so hard this year they produced 108 jars of honey for me, and I left them sufficient stores to get them through the winter.

One thing I learned about bees this year. There are NO loafers in the hive. They all work and contribute to the colony.

Some are nurse bees who work strictly in the hive. Some are guard bees that defend the hive against robbers who would steal the fruit of their labors. Then there are the foragers, who risk life and limb to go up to (6) miles to gather pollen and nectar, and then bring it back to the hive. There are the drones (male bees) who's only purpose is to mate with the queen. Then, there is the all-important queen whose job is to lay thousands of eggs per day, to keep the hive population up, and ensure that there will be new replacements for ones who die - or should we say "wear out" due to their tireless work ethic.
 

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Thanks Jamie!

Along with harvesting honey, my wife and I are learning how to create things out of the wax that we harvest. We recently made some candles, which give off a wonderful honey scent - another benefit of beekeeping.

It is really an amazing thing to work in tandem with these little creatures. We try to take good care of them too!
 

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Very interesting the way they work that is kind of new to me, well 108 jars would do me a year.
The wax I did not know you could use it like that.
Thanks for all the information.
 

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Great looking bee hives. They are very well built. Are they your own design or are there plans avaiable. Thanks for posting.

God Bless
tom
 

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Tom,

Thanks for the kind comment.

I actually bought a complete hive from a Beekeeping supplier, and then used it as a pattern for mine. These hives are (8) frame hives. There are plans available online for (10) frame hives here.

Full boxes of honey on a ten frame hive can weigh close to 100 lbs. I didn't want to use that size because it is too hard on my back. My full boxes will weigh closer to 60 lbs., which I can handle a little better.
 

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Hey Tom, I have two swarms out here that need a new home. How do I package them.;-)) Rand
 

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lilredweldingrod,

It's really late in the year to catch a swarm and help them survive over the winter. If they don't have a sufficient amount of honey stored up, they won't make it unless you feed them with a 50/50 mix of sugar and water.

If you could find a local beekeeper, he could help you catch them and put them into a proper "home" for the winter. That would be the best bet. Here's a link to a site that has a lot of information about such things. I have gleaned a lot of useful knowledge from it. I hope that helps!
 

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Tom,

That is a great looking hive, much better than the ones you see commercially. That is quite a bit of honey, do you sell it or just use it for yourself? How many do you eventually plan on having?
 

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very well build hive Tom
and it was great to see the vaxhoneycombs made natural
here in Denmark I have only seen honeycombs made by human tecnic in behives
I think its becourse they want the bees to be productive as possiple due to the short seson

take care
Dennis
 

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Tom have you ever thought of other beeswax products?
U used to sell my beeswax polish and beeswax and carnuba wax woodturning bars.
I've recipes if you want.
Jamie
 

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Jamie,

Sure, send me some recipes, and I'll check it out. Thanks!
 

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Max,

Thanks for the compliment.

We sell some and give a lot away. I'm open to having a lot more hives. We'll see how it goes next year. Hopefully, my bees will do fine over the winter, and then will start out strong in the spring when the honey flow begins.
 

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Dennis,

Thank you very much for the kind comment. I didn't realize that you were in Denmark! Wish I could get over there and visit your country some day.
 

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great hobby … and hive
 

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Thanks Dan!
 

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I want to thank you for posting this. It brought back so many memories.
My grandfather was a beekeeper. I grew up helping him in the beeyard and the honey house.
Those boxes also make great tables and chairs. Growing up, when at my grandfather's house, children didn't sit at the same table as the adults at meal time. We turned one bee box on it's side for a seat and the other was placed on it's end to set our plate on.
 
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