LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner

Comments

· Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Really nice idea.
My son is a tree climber and brought me a heaping load of Macintosh apple tree wood logs today.
I'm going to paint some log ends tomorrow to slow down the drying and minimize end splits.
Then I'm going to try to rig up some type of sled system like we see here.

Thanks again for making my to do list longer! : 0~
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7,502 Posts
Fantastic! Thanks for sharing your (or whom ever) idea. Looks like it does a great job.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,517 Posts
Great Rig.
Jamie
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,110 Posts
Thanks guys . lLoks like this place is going back to it's roots.
Glad to help.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
I like the idea. I will make it with a 25" incra miter slider bar with t slot retaining clips reaching to the back end of the box, and attaching my incra miter gauge to the front. Total length about 36". This will keep the box from tipping on the front end or when extending off the back end of the table because of the t slot clips on both miter bars. No need for an extension box, but may need an outfeed support if goes too long off the table. Just depends on how long I make the box, but will probably size it so it won't go more than half way off the table. I have added 5-10" ,2x extension wings screwed on to the sides of my table to make it larger all around, so I can make the box llonger than if I just had the standard size table.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
3 years ago I cut new wood and liked it. Once I cut log in half I'd continue making stuff. Sometimes it would warp, but I had a sander.

Also wet wood is easier to cut. Just have to live with result. Sometimes it tells you what to make!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,767 Posts
I've resawn wet wood and some that was "dry". Gotta say the wet was easier to saw with a 1" 3T on a 2HP 21". Agree with the "wet cleanup" comment above. Do sticker the planks but be sure ventilation is allowed under the cover.
The jig is nice and I've tried several. Know what my fall back has always been? I take a 2×6 of required length and using the flattest and most secure side of the log down, I screw both ends of the log to the 2×6 being sure that the screw heads are countersunk, wedging (with Poopies invention-see most discussed) where necessary. With a chalk line showing the intended cut (overhanging the 2×6) I saw patiently along the line to create a genuine flat surface. From there on I follow the pattern any sawyer might use to get planked, quartered, or rift sawed output. Instead of screwing from bottom before each new cut, I replace the long screws used on the first cut with several smaller screws that protrude about 1/16" from the surface of the 2×6 to form a "bed of nails" that will securely prevent the log slipping about. Most of the time after the first cut, though, the flat is sufficient that no carriage is needed. A pointed resaw fence (or roller) is handy, but chalklines are easy to follow. Dan
 

· Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
Definitely want to cut the logs while green/wet. Logs stored whole while drying will suffer internal checking which may reduce the amount of usable lumber once cut. Plus, the cut boards dry faster.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
cool jig - will have to build one of these for my shop - always good turning logs into useful boards…
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,507 Posts
I love it!!

Cheers, Jim
 

· Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Hey Bob!! I am just venturing into sawing logs to lumber and love this design! Did you use plans or have any you would be willing to share?
 
Top