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Showcase cover image for Auxiliary TS/Router Fence and FB Rail

Project Information

The subject of an auxiliary fence and safety came up in response to my recent Magic Molder product review ( http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/3999 ) and I indicated I would share mine. So here is my Auxiliary TS/Router Fence and Feather Board Rail system that has evolved over the past 20-years to provide both vertical and horizontal feather boards (FB), reduced clearance inserts (RCI) for my router bits plus various specialized fences.

Obviously, the vertical and horizontal feather boards provide safety in preventing kick back and provide constant downward/inward pressure to insure consistent cutting. The FBs are fully adjustable as you can see from the slots and star-wheels. The constant vertical and horizontal pressure allows you to push (feed) up to the first FB, stop and move to the back, pull (out feed) end to finish a cut without any problems. These feather boards and the rail can be seen in the first photograph (above) where the set up is used to cut the 5/16" round molding with the Magic Molder on the edges of a 1"x2" board.

This fence system started life using the Biesemeyer T-Square Auxiliary Fence that used to be available in PM gold before Biesemeyer was sold to Delta and subsequently became available only in Delta gray (if at all now). You can see the back of the original Biesemeyer Auxiliary Fence in Photo 2 (above) which shows how it attached to the original TS fence with two round knobs that raise the back of the "L" bracket and transfer pressure to the side of the original fence. Photo 2 also shows the four horizontal slots I cut with four-star wheels to add my supplemental fences (which are also shown). The supplemental fences shown are the one next to the original fence, which has the slots, and a second fence which has the bolts that ride in the first fence slots and are tightened using the star wheels. Also shown is the 2-1/4" vacuum hose outlet, which collects sawdust from the router outlet inside as limited by the RCI on the second fence (outside). The RCI inserts for the router bit are shown in Photos 3, 4, 5 and 6.

The next photo shows the vertical FB in place over the router bit.



Next is the FB rail added to the router set up to utilize the horizontal FBs.



Following is a close up of the front of the FB rail showing how the rail clamps to the front Biesemeyer fence rail:



And, this is a close up of the back of the FB rail showing how it clamps to the back of the Biesemeyer "L" rail:



This is an edge-trimming fence that is adjusted around a flush trim bit to trim the proud edge of a solid stock, which I often glue to a plywood edges to provide a finished look of solid wood. The front fence is raised to provide clearance for the proud solid wood up to the router bit (in feed fence); and, the back fence is lowered to the table top, much like a vertical joiner out feed fence. The plywood is run vertically against the fences. Both fences attach to the second auxiliary fence by means of the "t" bolts and "t" slot in the auxiliary fence.



This is the original Biesemeyer Auxiliary Fence that I ran a groove 1/8" from the bottom and 1/8" deep so I could use it to make a controlled rip on Formica and similar thin stock.



This is a spacer fence to insert between the first and second fence shown in Photos 2 and 3 above when extra thickness is needed for a large diameter router bit (such as a raised panel bit):



This is an extra tall, 12" fence (which I was sure I would need, but haven't found occasion to use):



This is the out feed view of both the horizontal and vertical FBs in use to control the trim cut of a 1"x2" molding piece:



And, this is the in feed view of the same horizontal and vertical FBs in use to control the trim cut of a 1"x2" molding piece:



This is my auxiliary fence system as it has evolved over the past two decades, and I am sure will continue to evolve.

As always, comments (good, bad, critical or whatever) are greatly appreciated. Thanks for looking.

Gallery

Comments

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Super fine John. Your fabrication is amazing. Deluxe in my book. :)
 

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What a well thought out professional looking fence John. I don't see how it would be possible to make making molding any safer with the all the FBs in place. Is that another anti kick back device in front of your blade?
 

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Wow John! A lot of thought went into this, great design. The safest setup I've seen for sure.
 

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Roger-Thanks, it's always great to hear from you!

Lee-Thanks, and yes, in front of the blade is an old Biesemeyer splitter with anti-kickback pawls. It's pre-riving knife, but is a great safety device in my opinion for ripping, etc.
 

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Very well thought out system. Nice job on building this. I may be adding some of this to my table saw. Great work John.
 

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WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!! That is the ultimate fence! You sure put a lot of thought into it, I can tell!!!!!!

Thanks for sharing!!.....................Cheers, Jim
 

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Awesome work and well planned!
 

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Interesting safety devices. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Boy you got some interesting setups their and it makes for some good precices results .
I will have to keep them in mind and I also like the replaceable inserts you have for different router bits .
Thinking ahead never is a mistake because you never know but it's sure nice to have that fence or whatever ready to go .
I build all kinds of stuff because I have an idea and when the time comes there it is .
Keep passing along those innovations because it helps all of us .

Klaus
 

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Jeff, Dave, Jim, Topamax, Alex and Klaus-Thank you all for taking the time to look and comment on this project that has been in the making for some time. Coming from you gentlemen who have all contributed such high levels of craftsmanship and innovative design, it is a humbling experience. Best, John.
 

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Thanks for sharing this John.
 

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Definitely motivates me to make a better / longer horizontal feather board for my table saw.

One question… is there a functional purpose to the bits of dowels that are sticking out on a couple of the boards?
 

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thanks HillbillyShooter for sharing awesome set up
 

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Randy-thanks for looking and commenting. I regret not being around last Friday when you posted your latest design evolution to your Valet Box, but with the nice weather I've been fishing and playing hookie from my shop and LJs-great work!

Scott-thanks, and to answer your question, those dowels are alignment pins for double FBs. If you look closely at the 8th picture, you can see the double FBs on the FB Rail. I also have a double FB for horizontal positioning.

Eddie-thanks, and it is my pleasure to share since I receive so much more from LJs than I'll ever be able to repay.
 

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What a nice shop made set up! You would have to try pretty hard to get hurt with that.

Hope you are catching as well as fishing.
 

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Looks great, John, but I'm wondering how you pushed the workpiece in the last photo past the bit. It seems to me that you would have to push and then pull-no place for a push stick.
 

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Andy-thank you for looking and commenting. So far it has worked well and worked safely, but I'm open to any suggestions for improvement. And, in all modesty, I've been very blessed in my fishing experiences-I'm optimistic that before long I can call myself a real fly fisherman.

John-Thank you for looking, commenting and questioning. The answer to no place for a push stick is two fold: (1) I often use a stick of smaller size which is off set from the cutting line to push up to the blade and then stop, go to the end and pull; or, (2) in this case and most of the time, the piece being cut is 65" long and there is plenty of material to push past the blade, stop, and pull for the other end.
 

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You obviously value safety and quality results. I can't imaging a piece of stock has anywhere to go once its in your system resulting in consistency … Amazing job.
 

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As I would expect John, a well thought out and practically applied accessory. Not to mention the excellent care to detail and craftsmanship.

We have all I am guessing taken liberties with our safety, me included. I have a couple of scars to prove my indifference to personal safety. Thankfully my mistakes were not punished to any long lasting degree. However, what I think some forget is, a slip or lack of concentration could result in a painful and life changing injury if no guards are installed . The tools we use for enjoyment and the enhancement of our hobby are not toys. They bite and bite hard. So, great to see another fellow woodworker taking safety seriously and building jigs to minimise the risk of harm.

And, congrats on making the DT 3

I hope all is well your side.

David
 

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David & David-Thanks to both of you for your comments and observations. It's gratifying and humbling to have all the positive response as to the safety of this system.

If anyone has any suggestions to improve safety, I welcome them. So far as the design has evolved, I've not experienced any problem whatsoever; but, I want to keep it that way and I'm totally open to anything someone else might question or spot as a potential problem.
 
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