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Project Information

Wood And Materials Used
Maple, Spruce, Birch Ply, Baltic Birch
Tools Used
Table saw, jointer, planer, router
I finally got around to replacing the embarrassing, saggy outfeed table that I'd assembled in a rush from construction-grade plywood when I first built my shop. This is still a fairly humble bench in comparison to some of the works of art that others post on this platform, but it will serve me and most likely outlast me.



I built the frame this past spring from dimensional construction-grade spruce. This is a photo of an initial dry assembly. I opted for through tenons on the end assemblies and proud stretchers because I couldn't be sure about shrinkage of the less-than-dry spruce. The cross members are aligned by 1/2" dowels and held in place with lag bolts. The stretchers (not pictured) are attached with carriage bolts. Theoretically, apart from the end assemblies, the entire thing can be disassembled, but I don't anticipate doing that in my lifetime. All the material came from 2x6s milled to 1/14" thickness and laminated. The frame is 48" x 48" (l x w).



I was doing this work in between paying jobs, so when it came time for the top I didn't have time to do a full solid-top lamination, but I still wanted a rock-solid top that was dead flat. I opted for Baltic birch just in time for Russia to invade Ukraine and push the price into the stratosphere. The top is 3 layers of 5/8" Baltic birch laid in alternating directions and a replaceable 1/4" Baltic birch skin, all edged in Maple. In hindsight, had I known what the BB was going to cost me, I might have been able to do solid maple for not much more. But again, time restraints. I do a lot of glue ups on this table, so I elected to finish the top with a water-based polyurethane to facilitate glue cleanup. The finish also reduces friction for the table's outfeed function, as I find the "fuzziness" of Baltic Birch to make for a rather sticky surface.



Early this fall I had some more time to complete the storage cabinets. Carcasses are cabinet grade birch, which is kind of a waste, because most of it is hidden, but it had been taking up space in my shop for 11 years, so it was time to put it to use. The drawers you see on this side are 28" long, made of baltic birch. Drawer fronts are solid maple. The drawers on the opposite (vice) side are 18" long. I'm already enjoying having markup tools and other necessities close at hand, since this is my primary work area in the shop. It serves triple duty as work bench, outfeed table and assembly table. The gap at the top will allow me to blow out accumulated dust and to retrieve any small items that might fall through dog holes (yet to be drilled).



The vice is just a cheap Lee Valley purchase. As might be apparent from the overall design, I'm not a huge hand tool user, but I have found the vice a welcome addition. You might also notice that this is a tall bench (just over 40"). That's because I spend countless hours at this bench gluing up panel assemblies, assembling drawers, and above all, sanding. I find a taller bench much kinder to my back and neck for this type of work.

Thanks for stopping by. Constructive criticism and questions always welcome.

Comments

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40 Posts
Thank you for posting your design! I am planning on doing the same idea with my table-saw. I am still deciding on how many different tasks that it can accommodate to finalize mine. Your design has certainly inspired me!
Great build!!!
Ellery Becnel
 

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Premium Member
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3,304 Posts
like the multiple use of the outfeed table. Drawers and the vice, etc. Well done.
 

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6,567 Posts
Looks really nice. Make it for your work. I think we are moving from the bench that said this is what a bench has to have, to this is what I want on my bench.

I recently made a rolling outfeed/bench/storage, but mine is all from scraps, and I freely admit it's not a looker. I'm still deciding on a vice, and think I'll do a moxon vice/bench to further elevate close work. Beside a failing back, my eyes aren't what they once were. I think overall as more woodworkers are blended between power, and hand tools, that our benches are changing more to work tables to assist in all of the varied work, support, and clamping we need to accommodate both hand, and power tools.

I like the drawer storage, but for mine I have bigger cubbies on the outfeed bench because my extra "stuff" is bigger on the TS. Thing is it should support what you have that will live close to it.

Hope it allows for better storage, and support for everything you do.
 

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1,403 Posts
That is a very cool design. Well done.
 
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