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Project Information

[Legebla ankaŭ en Esperanto]

These are two sets of coasters that I made from reclaimed lumber. Both measure about 4 inches square and are about 1/2 inch thick. These might be sold at a our yard sale this weekend or they might end up as gifts. The darker set is made from an oak board which I got from a pallet. It was planed and sanded before cutting.

The lighter set is from a board I had which I think might be maple. It's not solid maple, but perhaps maple nonetheless. To jazz it up I cut a few kerfs in it and glued in a strips of oak, walnut and bamboo. I kind of like the randomness of the result.

The coasters themselves are identical in their cuts. I ran a kerf about 1/2 inch in on each edge to break up the monotony and beveled the edge of each one. The holders are different because I felt the lighter coasters needed something more interesting than a plain box. Hey, it's artsy!

The holders are all simple, glued butt joints with a kerf run in strategic places to help hide the joint. The top edges are also beveled, so the holders sort of continue the design motif of the coasters. I finished everything with boiled linseed oil.

[EDIT] Looking at the lighter wood, I'm leaning back towards poplar, but it's heavier than what I'd expect.

Fun fact: The word for coaster in Esperanto is subtaso (soob-TAH-soh)

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Comments

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Nice looking sets of coasters, Dave! Simple, elegant, and definitely useful!
 

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Nice, Dave! I like the kerfing on the joints of the boxes. Thanks for sharing.
 

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I am glad to see projects from reclaimed lumber, it provides more ideas for what I can do with all of my scrap/reclaimed pieces.

These are definitely elegant and yet very beautiful.
I am going to cut a bunch out for Christmas presents.

Thanks for sharing!
 

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I am glad to see projects from reclaimed lumber, it provides more ideas for what I can do with all of my scrap/reclaimed pieces.

These are definitely elegant and yet very beautiful.
I am going to cut a bunch out for Christmas presents.

Thanks for sharing!

- oldnovice
These are definitely quick and easy Christmas presents. The secret is to use interesting wood-or to make it interesting.
 

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Thank you, everyone, for putting me in the Daily Top 3! It feels good.
 

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I like those with different wood straps and holder of another one.
 

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Very nice.

I'm curious. Do these wood coasters have issues when drinks sweat on them? I've been thinking of making some for gifts, but that continues to be a concern of mine.
 

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Very nice.

I m curious. Do these wood coasters have issues when drinks sweat on them? I ve been thinking of making some for gifts, but that continues to be a concern of mine.

- Burb
I don't think they'd have issues different from any other wooden coasters. I kept a sweaty glass on one tonight during supper as an experiment. The drops puddled under the glass. I wiped it off and let it dry. It looks fine.
 

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I don t think they d have issues different from any other wooden coasters. I kept a sweaty glass on one tonight during supper as an experiment. The drops puddled under the glass. I wiped it off and let it dry. It looks fine.

- Dave Rutan
Speaking of this, you didn't mention a finish on these. If they're bare wood, the sweat would raise the grain, no?

I'm thinking of making some coasters, and have thought about this, and am thinking about finishing them with a few coats of wipe-on poly. Of course, this might make the surface slippery when the glass sweats, and have the glass slide right off!

So I'm curious what you'd recommend!
 

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I don t think they d have issues different from any other wooden coasters. I kept a sweaty glass on one tonight during supper as an experiment. The drops puddled under the glass. I wiped it off and let it dry. It looks fine.

- Dave Rutan

Speaking of this, you didn t mention a finish on these. If they re bare wood, the sweat would raise the grain, no?

I m thinking of making some coasters, and have thought about this, and am thinking about finishing them with a few coats of wipe-on poly. Of course, this might make the surface slippery when the glass sweats, and have the glass slide right off!

So I m curious what you d recommend!

- Mean_Dean
The last sentence of the bottom paragraph, before the [EDIT] says I used boiled linseed oil. That said, I have a set oc coasters in daily use that are coated with spray lacquer. Looking at the one near my seat, notice the finish is wearing thin from exposure to water. I'll have to re-coat it. Boiled linseed oil should repel water for a time, but ideally it also should be renewed occasionally.

I don't see wipe-on poly being a problem. You might want to load on the coats for the top surface. Surfaces that receive use or friction will always need occasional renewing, just like a coffee table (if coasters are not used on it.)
 
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