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Project Information

My wife asked me to build her a vinyl turntable stand to display her new "toy" as well as her burgeoning collection of vinyls. She found a design on Etsy she liked and I embarked on my latest project by sizing it to her needs.
I made it out of maple, edge glued, butt jointed and added a small backing for strength and tapered angled legs.
I struggled a bit with the edge glueing (my so end project with the technique) and I had to cut and restart the process to address some bowing and cupping I experienced. I should have planed them and will use that approach on my next project. Dimensions are 36" long by 16" wide and 16" deep. Each leg (two 15" maple strips glued together for more support) were tapered and angled at 12". I stained it with a dark walnut color and I applied 3 coats of urethane with a light 400 grit sanding in between.
Few imperfections (ridges between board, urethane drip on edges) but she is happy with it.

…and you know the saying: "Happy wife, …"

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Comments

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You've got my attention, my new turntable will be here tomorrow!
Nice workmanship on the stand. I can tell you from experience your going to need more record storage space.

Headed to the shop to make some man-glitter, just finishing an addition the stereo cabinet.

Edit, by the way. How did you figure out the splay on the legs?
 

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Your first project looks nice.

Some things to be aware of:
Butt joints have no strength against racking and lots of albums are heavy and can cause racking as they slide in the space provided.

It might never become an issue for you yet it's something to keep an eye on. The small back piece will help some but proper joinery in the future will help more.

I think a case like this is best suited (most strength) having dovetails or box joints, followed by a rebate with hidden splines, and then dowels or screws with plug covers.
 

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Maybe for next time I'd add that, to compliment the style you chose, you could use mitered edges with splines. Not as strong as other joinery, but more complimentary to the style you choose with added strength. This also lets you add some detail to the joints. Or, if you want to hide them, use the same wood for the splines. It's a really pretty table, nicely done!

Any specific reason why you used maple then stained it to walnut? I"m guess it was to match other decor. As opposed to just using walnut to begin with I mean….not that staining wood is ever an issue. Just seems a bit of a shame to cover up pretty maple like that.

Very pretty overall!
 

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Great comments and advice guys. I knew that LJ would be a trove of learning for me.
I soaked in all your suggestions and will try to build another one with adequate joinery (I was still still nervous about trying dovetails but you guys convinced me). As for the maple stained wood, very true, a walnut cabinet would look much nicer with a protective finish.
For the "splay" on the legs (I assume you mean the pitch - sorry I am still learning the lingo, and I'm French!) I tried a couple of angles and settled on 12 degrees for look and stability. I measured each corner to locate the exact position and orientation of the legs.
As for the backing, it was added to compensate for the rudimentary butt joint Gary commented on.

I need to go and make another -better one now…cheers.

Alain
 

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Nice mid century. Dowels would work for butt joints and leaning records side…imho The splayed legs is what I would worry the joint on. How did you attach the legs?
 

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I like it, nice job! And the suggestions above are good ones.
 
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