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Eighteenth Century Cabinet #1: Some Joinery Pictures

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Blog entry by shipwright posted 01-24-2021 02:23 AM 1065 reads 0 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Eighteenth Century Cabinet series Part 2: Some Pics of the Back, Legs and First Shelf »

There seemed to be a lot of interest in my 18th century French joinery post so I thought I’d throw out some progress pics. They are fairly self explanatory if you have watched the video https://youtu.be/Ul-GsIzkjIY so I won’t add a lot of words but feel free to ask if you have questions.


Trial curves to see what looked good. I chose the 2” one

Staves cut

Rub joints with HHG, no clamps

Sub-assemblies glued up with tape clamping

Curve check

Rough smoothing outside of curve

.... and inside


Sanding the show side.

That’s enough for now. I’ll post some more in a little while.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/



17 comments so far

View Julian's profile

Julian

1620 posts in 3697 days


#1 posted 01-24-2021 02:30 AM

Looking forward to seeing more of your progress.

-- Julian

View madburg's profile

madburg

319 posts in 1850 days


#2 posted 01-24-2021 07:15 AM

Thanks Paul. So I’m expecting you are using ‘old brown glue’?

-- Madburg WA

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

3993 posts in 3175 days


#3 posted 01-24-2021 08:20 AM

Thanks Paul. I like to follow this!

-- https://dutchypatterns.com/

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

1199 posts in 3506 days


#4 posted 01-24-2021 10:56 AM

Looking forward to see next posts.

In the video, there is a drawer with a curved front made from a lamination.
For those interested, one might use the process shown here , which minimise waste.
(see from about 13’30” to about 22’ )
It is in a Nordic language but is more or less self explanatory.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1425 posts in 4090 days


#5 posted 01-24-2021 11:51 AM

Glad to see this Paul!
I was wondering how you tackled the inside curved faces. Is that the only 2 tools you used? The scraper and the curved sanding block?
When I’ve done similar in the past, I’ve used a few different methods though they all finished off with both the scraper and sanding block.
Earlier stages all depended on how much material needed to be ‘roughed out’. Anything from a long handled paint scraper, radiused with a very rough burr(to avoid burnt thumbs), to a small belt sander with a curved platen.
Even tried coving the pieces out individually(roughly) on the table saw before glue up. It worked(roughly lol) but it seems to be one of those things that….by the time I’m done screwing around trying to figure out a ‘better way’, it could have been done already using cruder initial methods.
I considered trying the cnc for coving the individual pieces(in one wide glue up, then ripping) but it goes back to the above…too much screwing around, not to mention a waste of time for a production machine to be doing ‘one of’s’.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

6829 posts in 1589 days


#6 posted 01-24-2021 12:49 PM

Definitely looking forward to more of these, Paul. Thanks for showing us the way.

-- Dave - Santa Fe

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2873 posts in 3645 days


#7 posted 01-24-2021 01:11 PM

I was wondering how you clamped the curved sides, and now we have the answer: you didn’t!

-- I intended to be a woodworker, but turned into a tool and lumber collector.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8678 posts in 3805 days


#8 posted 01-24-2021 03:09 PM

Thanks,

Martin Only HHG is really any good for rub joints. OBG will be used elsewhere where I need open time but I prefer HHG when possible.

Tony, I considered coving on the TS but the radius doesn’t work. I also toyed with some other ideas but with the small amounts to be removed in each stave it was easiest to just get it done. I did try my 5” Mirka sander a bit but was afraid of making the surface uneven for veneering. It really needs to be a curved plane with no dips. :-)

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1533 posts in 734 days


#9 posted 01-24-2021 04:35 PM

One of my favorite masters.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/Rembo/blog/26532

He has quite a set up, much more than needed if just doing a panel or two.
But it’s food for thought worth sharing for those that haven’t seen it.

Sometimes a sanding block is best… :)
https://youtu.be/5dei5OfWI-c

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

1425 posts in 4090 days


#10 posted 01-24-2021 06:09 PM


Tony, I considered coving on the TS but the radius doesn’t work.

The radius didn’t work when I did it either. Thats why I said it ‘roughly’ worked. The pieces were wider and thicker, so there was a lot more material to remove…would have been hell with just a scraper.


I also toyed with some other ideas but with the small amounts to be removed in each stave it was easiest to just get it done.
- shipwright

Yep, like I said, sometimes the cure is worse than the disease.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1533 posts in 734 days


#11 posted 01-24-2021 06:57 PM

Flat panels make it easier..
Made this in the late 80’s

View lightweightladylefty's profile

lightweightladylefty

3604 posts in 4719 days


#12 posted 01-24-2021 07:45 PM

Paul,

We loved that video and all your photo progress. Thanks for sharing.

L/W

-- “Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.” Benjamin Franklin -- Jesus is the ONLY reason for ANY season.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8678 posts in 3805 days


#13 posted 01-24-2021 09:11 PM

Leroy, You have to remember I’m a boat builder. It’s the straight lines and square corners that challenge me. The curves are a piece of cake. :-)

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

1533 posts in 734 days


#14 posted 01-24-2021 09:31 PM

I love curves. I just end up doing it more commercially than traditional.
In other words non heirloom style. LOL

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

1199 posts in 3506 days


#15 posted 01-25-2021 08:59 AM

I guess the best tool would be a plane with a curved sole, like a moulding plane but with a large radius.

Paul Sellers shows somewhere how to do one.
He made a plane with double curvature (longitudinal and transversal) for stool making.

Where I live, wooden planes on flea market are available for a few Euros.
I would modify one. Adding a ~1cm layer to the sole and rounding this layer as needed. And of course cambering the iron. If one hot glue the added layer, it would be reversible.
Otherwise, a few dowels and a recessed screw should work.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

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