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Bedrock #605 Restoration #1: And so it begins...initial assessment

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Blog entry by sansoo22 posted 12-03-2021 08:29 PM 1429 reads 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Bedrock #605 Restoration series Part 2: Cleaning...and some bad news »

It’s been awhile since I posted my Marsh M5 restoration and my process has changed a tad. I’ve been trying to find a good candidate for a new series and was lucky enough to receive this plane in the mail the other day. It was addressed to the “Plane Rehab Center” so I thought it would be a great candidate for a new blog series. It came with a rather mundane #110 as well. The #110 and another jack plane from my pile of jack planes will get restored and donated to a local charity. They will either sell them or use them in their adult learning classes.

This first post regarding initial assessment is going to get long and maybe a tad wordy. However this is, in my opinion, one of the most important steps. You have to know what each piece may require before diving in if you want the best end results.

Assessment
Planes will usually ship to me fully assembled but sometimes the shipper will take them apart to fit them into a smaller package and save a little cash. So if the plane comes disassembled my first step is put it all back together. This one shipped in a few pieces so I put a drop of oil on all threads and put it back together.


Here she is all put back together. I do this just to make sure I have all the parts and to see if anything is damaged that might have to be addressed now before I get to far into the process.

The knob had a crack and as I was investigating that crack it came in half on me. It was a nice clean break and I didn’t want to get crud in the grain so I glued it back together already. Unfortunately no photos of that step.

If a plane ships fully assembled I take notes on where it might have the most gunk or rust build up. I like to know which parts may be a PITA to take apart so I can hit them with some penetrating oil while I work on other parts.

The next thing I do in my assessment is get out a some clean blue shop towels and lay all of my parts out like so..

At first glance we can glean a few things:
1. We are missing some pieces. Tote hardware and depth adjuster will need to be sourced
2. The chip breaker is most likely not original judging by pitting on the iron
3. The amount of pitting on the iron has earned it a seat in the trash can so we need one of those as well
4. All the original finishes are completely shot

Other than the 4 glaring things I noted I check for damage to threads, burs on the hardware slots, and excessive pitting. On this plane the hardware all checked out pretty clean. Minimal amount of work with the needle files to clean up burrs.

And thankfully I run an unofficial plane rehab center so I can just mosey on over to the parts bin and see what I can find. Low and behold I have all the type specific parts for this plane including an unused Q trademark iron.

I like my planes to have all original parts when I restore them so I am always on the lookout for parts and/or parts planes to keep stocked up.

For anyone questioning why I would trash that iron here is a close up of the back of the original alongside the unused replacement.

I can’t find a clean unpitted section to even grind/cut back to on this iron. I don’t waste my time trying to flatten something that pitted.

Areas of Concern
First up is the pitted lever cap. Most of this should come out but its something I will have to address with a considerable amount of hand sanding.

Next up is the tote. There is a hairline crack at the leading edge prior to the front bolt. What I like to do is determine if that crack is going to open up when under pressure.

Here it is with no pressure on the bolt

And lucky for me no gap seems to appear when we tighten the bolt down.

This is one of those things that only doing it wrong a few times can teach you. If we didn’t check it now and it did happen to open up under pressure we wouldn’t find out until after it cracked the finish on the handle. Trust me…that is a disappointment you don’t need in your life.

Next Steps
For sure the next steps are cleaning and lapping the body. We will see how well the frog fits and I may squeeze in dye printing the frog as long as it fits with minimal work. I’m trying to cover every step as in depth as I can so if they start to run long and have too many photos I will break them apart.

Well that’s it for part one. I hope something I rambled on about was useful to someone.



6 comments so far

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

6330 posts in 2555 days


#1 posted 12-03-2021 10:01 PM

Good blog!

I’m not a vintage plane guy, but I do appreciate the efforts and love to watch the thoughts and processes when restoring old iron!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

20636 posts in 2471 days


#2 posted 12-03-2021 10:07 PM

Very good note on the toe of the tote. One that I learned the hard way but still don’t remember to check :-) Something I do check though is whether or not the tote sits flat when the rear rod is tightened down or whether it lifts the toe. If it lifts the toe and tightening the screw pulls it down flat, the stress will eventually lead to a failure in the thinnest part – the toe.

Just trying to come up with something to add to your process to make it a little more time consuming ;-P

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

1972 posts in 987 days


#3 posted 12-03-2021 11:13 PM



Very good note on the toe of the tote. One that I learned the hard way but still don t remember to check :-) Something I do check though is whether or not the tote sits flat when the rear rod is tightened down or whether it lifts the toe. If it lifts the toe and tightening the screw pulls it down flat, the stress will eventually lead to a failure in the thinnest part – the toe.

Just trying to come up with something to add to your process to make it a little more time consuming ;-P

- HokieKen

The tote laying flat is one of the things I do often forget to check until reassembly. Then I’ve got a freshly finished glossy handle I have to wrap in a cloth so I can clamp it in a vise and work on it. I’ve had a few I never could get right. They probably still have about a 1/32nd gap at the toe but so far they are holding up just fine. I’m sure someday I’m going to wonder why they cracked though.

View 55woodbutcher's profile

55woodbutcher

93 posts in 1159 days


#4 posted 12-04-2021 03:47 AM

Interesting, good stuff.
But what is dye printing the frog?

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

20636 posts in 2471 days


#5 posted 12-04-2021 03:57 AM

Ahh 1/32” is probably insignificant. I’ve had them as much as 1/8” which is when I address it. 1/32 will probably last forever with no assistance. 2 and 3 sizes are the ones you have to watch the most. Since there’s no toe screw, a lifted toe means a loosey-goosey grip.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

1972 posts in 987 days


#6 posted 12-04-2021 03:32 PM



Interesting, good stuff.
But what is dye printing the frog?

- 55woodbutcher

I got the idea from HokieKen’s blog post and it works wonders. I use red Dykem layout fluid and paint it on the machined mating surfaces of the body where the frog seats. Then gently set the frog into body and gently lift it back out. This will leave red dye on the frog where it makes contact with the body. You can now easily identify any high/low spots that need to be filed to ensure a solid fit.

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