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Dunlap 103.23622 Drill Press #3: Getting ready for the machinist

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Blog entry by sansoo22 posted 11-09-2021 01:39 AM 1689 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Addressing the motor pulley and shaft Part 3 of Dunlap 103.23622 Drill Press series no next part

I have not had time at all in the last few months to work on this project. I finally just got back in the shop a couple weeks ago after the summer from hell and had some customer planes that needed done first. Now that the first few of those are waiting for finishes to cure I can get back to my drill press.

I have decided I am not going to restore this to original condition. It is going to be what they call in the classic car world a resto-mod. I’ve decided on a metallic gold for the paint color. That original Dunlap paint is almost gold and almost beige at the same time and it bugs me.

I REALLY want to find the original headband for one of these old Craftsman/Dunlap/King Sealy drill presses so I can polish the ever loving hell out of it and put it on this one. They are very hard to come by it seems so I may not put that on the resto-mod list.

One thing I did come by at a very fair price was the triple handle off the Craftsman variant. Unfortunately there are a few issues with the feed mechanism that came with it. As in its about an 1/8” to short. I am super thankful that LJs very own HookieKen offered up his machining services to adjust the stock feed mechanism to fit the triple handle base plate.

My image above is kind of terrible but the Craftsman feed arm part is right next to the chrome triple handle base. The stock Dunlap is on the right. Ken is going to shorten the stock part and bore a hole to fit the pin that holds the handle plate on for me.

And just for Ken I put them thru shock water tonight…aka my cheap Chinese ultrasonic parts cleaner. I call it shock water because if you put your fingers in there…whether its running or not…they get a tad tingly. Needless to say I now unplug it before reaching in.

However shock water does do a FANTASTIC job of cleaning and I can’t believe I took so long sitting on the fence deciding if I wanted one.

Top part is freshly oiled after a shock water bath and the bottom part is what it looked like when it went in. I did absolutely nothing but mix up some solution, twist a couple knobs, and then watch TV. I seriously should have bought one of these years ago. Now its on to find one that doesn’t feel as though its trying to recreate a scene from Groundhog’s Day every time I use it.

That wraps up this post. Not a lot got done but damn is it nice to be working on things again.



5 comments so far

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HokieKen

20669 posts in 2473 days


#1 posted 11-09-2021 01:39 PM

I used a Rustoleum Gold rattle can (well about 8 of them before I was done…) to paint my PM90 lathe too. It was a near perfect match to the original color. That one should look nice on that head casting.

What’s the spring at the top of the second photo? That have anything to do with the feed return?

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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sansoo22

1972 posts in 989 days


#2 posted 11-09-2021 03:15 PM



What s the spring at the top of the second photo? That have anything to do with the feed return?

- HokieKen

Yep that is the feed return spring. It goes inside the feed arm thing and is held in with a pin. On the Craftsman variant the pin just underneath the spring in the second photo holds the handle plate as well as the spring. I have a spare feed assembly for the Dunlap complete with spring so I can still work on the drill press restore while some parts are at your shop.

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HokieKen

20669 posts in 2473 days


#3 posted 11-09-2021 03:17 PM

Ahhh. Never seen one that wasn’t a torsion spring. Interesting.

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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sansoo22

1972 posts in 989 days


#4 posted 11-09-2021 04:09 PM

If you’re curious there is how the feed spring engages with the feed tensioner and roughly how it all looks when installed in the headstock. It’s not the best engineering I’ve ever seen but it is quite effective assuming your machine is well lubricated.

In order to keep mine well lubricated I picked up a couple small Golden Rod oil cans and some Mobile DTE Heavy oil. The oil is ISO 100 rated and came recommended from a few folks at Vintage Machinery mainly due to the fact head stock is wide open to the atmosphere and that mineral oil has corrosion prevention additives in it.

For all the gear splines I’m going with good old fashioned Lucas Red N’ Tacky grease. I’ve packed many a wheel bearing with this stuff and its never let me down. I have seen some guys using marine grease on the splines because it resists corrosion but that stuff is so damn sticky I’m afraid it will get full of dust in no time.

And more info than you really needed but I wouldn’t be me if I didn’t research the hell out of something even as simple as machine oil and grease.

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HokieKen

20669 posts in 2473 days


#5 posted 11-09-2021 04:49 PM

I probably spent two full weeks researching grease and oil when I was rebuilding my milling machine ;-) The Mobile DTE is a good choice and the RnT grease will work fine in this application.

So the spring is acting as a torsion spring. Interesting way to skin that cat. If it works, it works!

-- I collect hobbies. There is no sense in limiting yourself (Don W) - - - - - - - - Kenny in SW VA

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