LumberJocks

Shop Improvments #2: More insulating

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by sansoo22 posted 12-27-2019 04:12 PM 431 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: The journey begins and it starts with the garage door Part 2 of Shop Improvments series Part 3: Toolbox organizer »

I think I’m done with all the cheap insulation projects I can do for this space. Door is completely done with new seal, new threshold, and friction fit panels for the windows. I even made some insulated shop shutters out of scrap ply and left over 1/2 in r-max foam.

Here is the friction fit panels. They have to be popped out to use the door which is a pain but they make a big difference in cutting down thermal transfer thru the single pane glass.

An outside shot of the new U+O door seal against the rubber door threshold. NO MORE LIGHT GAPS…YAY! This was a fairly inexpensive kit i picked up on amazon. Came with the seal, threshold, and aluminum track for the seal.

And some ingenuity on my part to get one corner sealed up. Had to trim the bottom seal away from the edge because it rubbed when the door was completely open and the new fancy opener kept throwing an error code at me. This was made from a chunk of the old seal and a modified chunk of the new seal. Ugly as all get out but works wonders

And finally my insulated shop shutters. I had a couple sheets of 1/4 ply get wet during my move so decided to chop those up as the skin for the 1/2” ply frame and r-max insulation. Didn’t plan for them to get so fancy but I couldnt make large clean panels and the seems bugged me. Last thing to do with this project is replace the window sill and sash but it works for now.

It’s been a lot of work but worth it so far. Last night when I finished up the shutters it was 62 and dropped to 55 overnight with outside lows in the 20s. That about a 10 deg net gain over what it used to hold overnight with similar outside temps.

The last thing to do, which involves the whole house, is blow in some new insulation in the attic. I have an attic fan so need to build a gangway from opening in the garage all the way to the other end of the house. If i ever wondered why i bought a track saw im sure ripping that much OSB will quickly answer that.



5 comments so far

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

708 posts in 631 days


#1 posted 12-27-2019 11:34 PM

Probably simpler to put in an attic access hole in the shop. A wood stove would be prefect…and you can easily put one in with a double insulated flue. Mine eats all my scraps and heats most of the house.

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

1125 posts in 506 days


#2 posted 12-28-2019 03:27 PM

I’ve been considering a small wood burning stove out in the shop. Just need to plan it out a bit better and stop sucking up all the wall space with tools.

If i could pipe some of that heat up thru the attic and dump it into the entry way I could help heat living and dining areas as well. There are big open doorways off the entry way for both of those rooms. And the living room has vaulted ceilings so anything to help heat it is a big bonus.

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

708 posts in 631 days


#3 posted 12-28-2019 03:38 PM

Well, I have a return air duct system, and opened it up above the stove (inlet opening just like any other), so when the heat comes on (or the fan as I have it programed to do based on house temp vs shop temp) it draws air into the HVAC system from above the wood stove. A simple filter addresses the dust issue and all you really need to do is run one of those 6” or larger flexible ducts from above the stove to the inlet side of your HVAC. That and a close off cover for when the stove is not in use and you are good to go. You will need a way for the air to get back into the shop, so a cracked door or a grate on a door is required.

I have found that I run the stove as house heat now, even if I am not in the shop.

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

1125 posts in 506 days


#4 posted 12-28-2019 11:32 PM

That makes a lot more sense now. My cousin is an HVAC installer so will pick his brain on duct work next time he is over. I’m a software architect with a good chunk of the house already automated so comparing temps and kicking on the furnace fan to cycle some heat out of the shop and into the house is no biggie.

The door to the house from the garage is a solid core wooden door. It shouldnt be a big deal to cut a hole in it for a grate. Guessing a standard 9×12 or close to that should work for air return.

I’m a little worried about how much room it might take up but getting rid of scrap and getting heat out of the deal seems like a win win. And if i ever run out of scrap…like thats a thing…my neighbor across the street sells firewood. Could just walk over with the dolly and pick some up.

View BlueRidgeDog's profile

BlueRidgeDog

708 posts in 631 days


#5 posted 12-29-2019 01:39 AM

Right…I use z-wave and just trigger the need to suck heat out of the shop. One thing to share with your Cousin is there is no need for a fancy hood over the wood stove…all the heat will rise, so an air intake on the ceiling works just fine.

It has helped me not hoard scraps. I have a rule…if it can’t make a standard cabinet door rail, then it is firewood. Funny sometimes starting a fire with a load of walnut or cherry.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com