LumberJocks

Bowl Making #2: Grants Timber Bowl hogging out the material Pt 2

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Blog entry by robscastle posted 06-16-2019 03:53 AM 773 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Grants Timber bowl, Life begins Part 2 of Bowl Making series Part 3: Grants timber bowl on the home run. »

OK I think we left off at mistake No 4, expecting a little router bit to cut so much Aust hardwood without complaining, and as a result the bearing failed.

Whats wrong with tools these days give them a bit of hard work and they spit the dummy.

I guess that’s why termites dont eat Jarrah!

Now mistake No 5 thinking today was Monday and I could just pedal off and get a bearing.

So I decided to continue on and hog out the material with a forstner and brad point bit.

The forstner bit did some amazing work, considering, so it was rewarded with a tickle with the file afterwards.

Next it was the brad points turn to get into all the small sections.

Thats about as far as I can go now, so I am off to church and then await the shops to open on the real Monday.

Should have watched this first!

https://www.woodline.com/collections/bowl-tray-templates

Waste Management
Check out the bucket full of waste good garden mulch there!

Stay tuned its gunna get exciting soon…(I hope)

-- Regards Rob



13 comments so far

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2854 posts in 1239 days


#1 posted 06-16-2019 05:01 AM


..... expecting a little router bit to cut so much Aust hardwood without complaining, and as a result the bearing failed.

Whats wrong with tools these days give them a bit of hard work and they spit the dummy.
- robscastle


Sorry buddy, but at time is the not so bright spark at the other end of the power tool that may be failing…

What type of router bit did you use?

While cutting circles for some clocks, I used a 2 fluted 1/4” x 3/4” router bit and it struggled. The overload on my trimmed grunted and the trimmer sighed with relief from the 5 minute rest. Eventually I repeatedly plundered on, all be it with shallower depths and slower feed.

For the second circle, I used an upspiral 1/4” x 3/4” full TCT bit. It went through the timber like butter and the poor cordless trimmer never complained…

Those few extra shekels in puchasing a full TCT bit are often worth it… You wouldn’t need to make that trip on your electric bike and thereby saving the difference in petrol cost

Hope you didn’t play up at church and got kept back to clean out the bullpit!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6223 posts in 2622 days


#2 posted 06-16-2019 05:38 AM

Just the facts
A CMT Bowl Cutter router bit 851-501-11B fitted with a bearing 791-011-00 or for Churchies it would be a 1/2” shank 19mm wide 16mm deep. Fitted with a bearing ID 1/2” OD 19 mm 4mm wide
or if you cannot read see below

Full metal jacket up spirals could not agree more.
I havent seeen a solid one and as I have no money could not afford one anyway
replacement from Carbatec is about $70 but a bearing is all thats needed, and it will be doubled up, fancy putting a 4mm bearing on that hogger in the first place, CMT possibly tested on Basswood or similar.
Agree operator error but insist line 3 still applies.

How about that forstner bit eh.. bloody impressive results there, shoulda done that in the first place!

Church well I dindnt actually go as it looked a bit stormy here, dark as now and no bike light!

-- Regards Rob

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

10640 posts in 4470 days


#3 posted 06-16-2019 06:07 AM

OOPS…

It’s a sad day when a plan does not come together…

Nice try… :)

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: https://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/index.php

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2854 posts in 1239 days


#4 posted 06-16-2019 06:31 AM

Sorry rc, again that blasted reading and me seem to be at loggerheads. I thought you were cutting with a straight bit… yeah the TCT do seem to miss bearings however a template follower and adjustment to the template might have solved/eliminated bearing issues (for straight cuts). As always I jumped to conclusions cause I’m nowhere fit enough to jump over even a 1/2 brick.

I know that $70 is nothing to sneeze at (unless you sprinkle pepper in your wallet… if you find it)... maybe take a green and red piece of paper out of that bigger wallet of yours…
Otherwise the cost of an electric bike (to do errands) and the time wasted to get the new bit, costed, may make that $70 seem like petty cash.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6223 posts in 2622 days


#5 posted 06-16-2019 07:00 AM

Dont mention the 2 flute straight bit it went walkabout too!

-- Regards Rob

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

975 posts in 1528 days


#6 posted 06-16-2019 08:39 PM

will you screw a large flat plate on your router base?

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6223 posts in 2622 days


#7 posted 06-16-2019 09:53 PM

Its a possibility, I need to sort through my timber stash first

-- Regards Rob

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2854 posts in 1239 days


#8 posted 06-16-2019 11:35 PM


will you screw a large flat plate on your router base?
- anthm27

The direction is very important ant’ man… is he going to screw it down or screw it up?


Its a possibility, I need to sort through my timber stash first

- robscastle


Hey rc if you are trying to imply that you have a large stash, what about applying the same to your piddly sized picture.
Bloody insensitive to us with poor eye sight.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6223 posts in 2622 days


#9 posted 06-17-2019 12:14 AM

Standby and if its confirmed as correct by somebody I will provide a better picture, but for now its just a guess.

-- Regards Rob

View Mark Wilson's profile

Mark Wilson

2585 posts in 1481 days


#10 posted 06-17-2019 12:29 AM

Watching closely, Rob.
Are you aware that wood in soil depletes the Nitrogen therein? Wood is a terrible mulch. Leaves, and other vegetation, are what you want. Salad scraps. Banana peels, apple cores, etc. I’m just sayin’.

-- Mark

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6223 posts in 2622 days


#11 posted 06-17-2019 01:18 AM

Thanks Mark.

I dumped it into an area next to where our tomatos are.

All our vegie waste goes into the worm farm so I guess its the next casting clean out site.

Otherwise I guess I will have to add some nitrogen when nobody is looking!

Thanks for the tip off.

-- Regards Rob

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2854 posts in 1239 days


#12 posted 06-17-2019 02:08 AM



Are you aware that wood in soil depletes the Nitrogen therein? Wood is a terrible mulch.
- Mark Wilson

Correctamundo M’W’.

rc, if you are a devotee of Richard Di Natale, I would admonish you for cruelty and desecrating the fauna of our precious Earth, however, I do advise you to glue it back together and place it in your recycled wood collection… maybe that search for that elusive scrap mentioned above is finally resolved.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6223 posts in 2622 days


#13 posted 06-17-2019 10:19 PM

In a form of restitution to mother nature I emptied the castings from one of our worm farms into the pit and mixed it all in then during the course of the day added some liquid nitrogen, no pictures for obvious reasons!
BTW dick appeared to be happy as a result!

-- Regards Rob

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