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Cliff's Silky Oak test

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Blog entry by robscastle posted 05-15-2019 06:16 AM 325 reads 0 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I saw Cliff’s post on his small lidded boxes and they were very impressive “bits of Scrap”

In particular the Silky Oak one really stood out.
Having an interest in wood polishing, that being the timber variety BTW I decide to see if I could out do him on surface finish.

It was a fail if you dont want to read on.

I found a “scrap” piece of Silky Oak I thought would be a good victim.

Now if you a follower of Bob Wemm in WA you will know to get any respectable surface sheen on wood you have to sand to to at least 400 Grit or higher.

I set up my other sander, as somebody saw fit to pinch my really “good looking” one.

Without boring you with the details and no prizes for guessing I sanded the sample to 600 grit.
Here it is in the raw.

Didnt look much different to me.

Next I did two finishing processes, 1. with a polishing compound and 2. using Shellawax.

First up The polishing compound:-

It didnt do anything amazing in my mind.

So second up I tried my trusty Shellawax.

The results were only marginally better.

Here is a shot of both sides.

Was it all worth the effort? You be the judge.

Acknowledgement to Cliff for keeping me occupied this afternoon.

-- Regards Rob



19 comments so far

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

818 posts in 1472 days


#1 posted 05-15-2019 08:55 AM

Good to see experiments, Lets see if Tung Oil and Carnauba wax looks better.
Couldn’t help but notice the Boeing strap on was it a battery drill?
Anyways, ”If its not Boeing im not going”

View pottz's profile

pottz

5030 posts in 1346 days


#2 posted 05-15-2019 02:13 PM

yeah waxes tend to just coat the surface i think if you used an oil it might pop the wood grain a lot more.ill wait for continued testing rc.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2509 posts in 1183 days


#3 posted 05-15-2019 02:46 PM

That is nice to know…. thank you for sharing the information.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View stefang's profile

stefang

16703 posts in 3696 days


#4 posted 05-15-2019 03:12 PM

It was difficult to see the difference from the photos Rob. I discovered a somewhat easy way to get a shiny, but not plastic looking finish. I just used 2 or 3 coats of regular polyurethane, and then used auto rubbing compound to polish it. The finish turned out silky smooth and it saved me a lot of sanding.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6018 posts in 2566 days


#5 posted 05-15-2019 10:05 PM

Some replies to the comments.

anthm27 After our phone call talking about Carnauba Wax and the Feast Watson Tung Oil I will continue on with Pt 2 after I go shopping. The Boeing strap, yes its on one of my drills as the original one broke and funny enough I never used it untill working at Smiths, trying to climb in and out of their crates wirh a hand full of tools made me realise just why they are there, so some memorbilia (sic) made the sacrifice!

pottz Exactly what Anthony and I were talking about on the phone so stand by for possibly some better results in Pt 2

LittleBlackDuck Thanks Alex I was good to have a short chat as well, It it made at least 2 people a little more at ease if nothing else.

stefang Again thanks for the input its along the lines Anthony and I were talking about and his green table is a example.
Although it didnt take up too much time I agree the sanding (in this case) was not worth the results.
I think the auto rubbng compound with Carnauba wax is the go its something Anthony eluded to as well, again standby for Pt 2 (I hope it works after getting everbody so excited).

I am still on the hunt for whoever pinched my sander, I may post a reward soon! See the link above.

-- Regards Rob

View pottz's profile

pottz

5030 posts in 1346 days


#6 posted 05-15-2019 10:29 PM

I am still on the hunt for whoever pinched my sander, I may post a reward soon! See the link above.

—Regards Rob

i think it was kenny rob he seemed awfully interested in that “sander”-lol.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

818 posts in 1472 days


#7 posted 05-16-2019 09:52 AM

Have you found that B——y Sander yet??????

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6018 posts in 2566 days


#8 posted 05-16-2019 10:08 AM

OK I wasnt going to bother posting this, ...yet another fail.

So are my final attempts to polish Silky Oak.

Bought this gear.

Sanded again to 600 grit

And applied the Carnauba wax

Looks like Cliff wins round 2 as well.

-- Regards Rob

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

10585 posts in 4414 days


#9 posted 05-20-2019 11:00 PM

Just apply an oil… BLO, tung, danish, etc. then if you wanted more protection, spray some clear lacquer over it a few times… No BIGGY…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View pottz's profile

pottz

5030 posts in 1346 days


#10 posted 05-20-2019 11:46 PM



Just apply an oil… BLO, tung, danish, etc. then if you wanted more protection, spray some clear lacquer over it a few times… No BIGGY…

- Joe Lyddon


and the real winner is joe who suggests exactly how i would do it,simple and will look incredible.no more testing needed rob.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6018 posts in 2566 days


#11 posted 05-21-2019 04:58 AM

Thanks Guys …I guess one needs a good whipping every now and then to keep them on the straight and narrow.

I guess its really my fault for looking at porn on LJs new members tab!!

All I need to do now is wait for Cliff to reply and deliver a TKO

Beeswax who uses it anyway …apart from candle stick makers!!

-- Regards Rob

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2509 posts in 1183 days


#12 posted 05-21-2019 05:51 AM

...I guess one needs a good whipping every now and then…

- robscastle

Depending on the whipee…

One needs a good whipping… full stop.

I may forever keep my morale down (just like my morals) and productivity low (like a ducks bum to the ground).

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View pottz's profile

pottz

5030 posts in 1346 days


#13 posted 05-21-2019 01:26 PM

how many cracks of a whip does it take to reform a duck ? maybe a cage is needed-lol.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

2509 posts in 1183 days


#14 posted 05-22-2019 02:30 PM

Hey rc, a serious question… (was that you in the Blue Oyster Bar in the chaps? It wasn’t me that saw you… err… a friend of mine told me…?)

What did you attach the buffers to? Grinder, lathe or drill (press or hand held)?

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6018 posts in 2566 days


#15 posted 05-22-2019 09:03 PM

LBD No it definately was not me in the Blue Oyster bar!! ...I had a police uniform on!

The buffers are atttached to various tools In this case because it was a small job a battery drill was used.
I dont have lathe but I do have a drill press I use otherwise, your gunna hafta read….
The first and most primtive is simply by hand.
Then simply a Battery Drill and buffer, closely followed by a KA Tools system called Geneive which has flexible shaft drive and muments including a couple of sureforms, then
A multi tool linisher fitted with a scotch brite belt.
and finally the Abbott and Ashbury Grinder modified with a tapered shaft for the big items. The are all great for metal polishing as well as woodworking.
An example:- I thought I had better add a picture in case you fell asleep!

The results:-
i

I have a variety of polishing compounds but usually only use the white one on wood.
In regard to wood:-
The best results come from Jarrah, Red Iron Bark and some gums. (meaning most hardwoods, (excluding Silky Oak)
You can even polish common garden variety pine but the soft sections give the timber a grain textured result.
I have done some work with Silky oak but never thought to try to polish it, up to when I saw Cliffs post that is.

-- Regards Rob

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