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My Review of the Grizzly G0532 Dry Spray Booth

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Review by kennymac posted 07-03-2016 10:24 PM 7133 views 1 time favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
My Review of the Grizzly G0532 Dry Spray Booth My Review of the Grizzly G0532 Dry Spray Booth My Review of the Grizzly G0532 Dry Spray Booth Click the pictures to enlarge them

Note, I have edited this review to add more information.

Hi Everyone,
Here’s another stab at a tool review, I seem to remember doing one once before. Still fairly new to woodworking, I’ve been at it for about a year and a half now. I’m amassing some nice tools along the way, and lately I’ve started to delve into spray finishes. I recently bought an Earlex 5500 HVLP spray system and I knew I was going to need a spray booth for the fumes. I got incredibly lucky by finding a Grizzly dry spray booth on craigslist about 30 minutes from my house; seemed like it was meant to be. So I picked it up last week and that’s how I got to now.

First comment: I’ve heard mostly mixed to bad reviews of both Grizzly’s quality and customer service so for the most part I’ve stayed away from their products. The G0532 and the G0533 were discontinued a few years ago, and as I was deciding on whether to get it or not that seemed like that wasn’t a great sign. Never the less I pulled the trigger and in my garage it sits.

Fit and finish: The spray booth was fully assembled, but sitting on the original shipping pallet. The previous owner told me it had never been used, and the electrical box appeared to support that. Everything appears to be in good working order, all parts are in place and the motor (2HP Baldor) works and sounds fine. I had to install a power chord which was easy. I will say that the green powder coat that Grizzly paints their products is peeling off many of the surfaces, which I am considering a negative. Otherwise it looks great.

Operation: Like I said I had to install a power chord, and I wired it for 220VAC operation. I have a wireless remote adaptor from woodcraft and I’ve been plugging the spray booth into that. Grizzly boasts 1250 CFM, and I will say it seems to pull that air without any problem. The filters were already installed when I got it and they appear to be pretty fresh. I can order replacements, which I plan to do soon. You can see from the pictures I installed a 10” 90 degree elbow on the output and have it connected to a 10” flex foil duct. That in turn is mounted to a window plate that I fabricated out of 1/2” plywood. Works great. The dry spray booth came with a manometer for determining how clogged the filters are, from what I can guess it measures the amount of pressure there is after the two stages of filtration and prior to the impeller. It seems like a simple system but it does need to be calibrated with fresh filters. I installed the red colored oil but I have not calibrated it yet. Once I order fresh filters I will do that.

Noise: The noise it produces is less than what my Jet dust collector does, and next to the Earlex turbine this dry spray booth almost seems silent. I was wearing a pair of ear defenders while shooting yesterday and I had no issues with noise.

Bottom Line: It’s worth every penny I paid! I am very happy with the operation and function of the spray booth. It does exactly what I hoped it would do, vent fumes safely. I am in the middle of shooting shellac and with the spray booth running you can’t smell a thing. It vents the fumes out the side window of my garage and the whole thing breaks down and wheels into the corner when I am done. I couldn’t be more pleased with the way this turned out. So the peeling green powder coat paint job aside I am considering this tool an excellent solution for spray finishing. I’m taking one star off for the peeling paint job.

Hope this is helpful, there aren’t many reviews of the G0532 on line (okay none that i could find). If anything changes I will update my review.

ken




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kennymac

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7 comments so far

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eddie

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#1 posted 07-05-2016 02:25 AM

i dont think they make these any longer , good review

-- Jesus Is Alright with me

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TexasOak

18 posts in 2681 days


#2 posted 07-05-2016 05:36 PM

Nice Surly!

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kennymac

47 posts in 2287 days


#3 posted 07-05-2016 07:13 PM



Nice Surly!

- TexasOak

Thanks! Funny you mention it, I’m heading out tomorrow with 4 friends to ride Pitt > Wash D.C., the GAP trail and C & O trail. We’re jamming 5 days of riding into a 9 day trip, taking a few days in Ohiopyle to either drink beer and raft or just drink beer. I just got that front bag mounted about an hour before I started shooting shellac, I’m pretty excited to get on the trip.

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kennymac

47 posts in 2287 days


#4 posted 01-13-2018 06:03 PM

So thought I would update this review slightly as I’ve had a chance to use the spray booth quite a bit since I first wrote the review. I’m thinking this should be rated 5 stars as I couldn’t really care if the finish on the spray booth is peeling here and there, this thing is a life saver!

Been a while since I’ve been on this board, and a lot has changed. We moved from NJ to FL which is a lot more daunting of a task than I first imagined. Luckily the house we bought has an 1800 square foot garage that is my private domain, my man cave if you will. So I am beginning to build shop cabinets and benches to fill out the space. Latest project is an outfeed table ala the WoodWhisperer. I’m fitting the area below with 4 drawers and I decided to practice my hand cut dovetails while I was at it. Drawers are done, it’s time to apply some finish. Enter the dry spray booth.

I’m toying with the idea of building some semi permanent walls to create a spray booth but as I wanted to knock this out I just erected the PVC and plastic walled temporary booth and away i went. The exhaust is heading out the window, but I plan to make a hard ducted exhaust above the cement block walls through the area below the roof line. Anyway I sprayed shellac on all the drawers and bottoms, knocking out a job that would have taken me many days to do by hand. The fumes were non existent, I just love how convenient this booth is. I plugged the Grizzly booth to a 240VAC wireless remote and it’s easy peasey.

So if you have the space and happen to find one of these don’t hesitate to get yourself one. They break down to a fairly manageable size once you are done, mine can be stored in the corner once I break it down.

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Acustic66

1 post in 27 days


#5 posted 04-15-2021 10:44 PM

Ken

Thank you for this review. Ive had this unit in storage for 10 yrs never built. Never had the room. Well now I have a “small” workshop and want to give it a go. Can you “please” help with the easy peasy part. I need help wiring. I am renting the workshop space so I cannot hard wire and its 115v only. So…

What is the 240 VAC wireless remote?
Does this plug into a 115v system?
Gauge cord?
Switch?

Please help me wire this puppy.

Many thanks.

Al

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kennymac

47 posts in 2287 days


#6 posted 04-16-2021 12:10 AM

Hi,
I’m writing this on my cellphone so I’ll have to give you a better reply tomorrow. Before I go let’s clarify a few things, do you have the same motor, 2 hp baldor motor? That may be a 120/240 volt depending on your wiring but I’ll check before I respond again. Either way there’s nothing to it really. Mine is on a 20amp 240 volt dedicated circuit which means you might be able to get away 12 gauge or even 14 gauge wire.

I’ll write again tomorrow and don’t mind helping any way I can. Talk soon.

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kennymac

47 posts in 2287 days


#7 posted 04-16-2021 04:18 PM


Ken

Thank you for this review. Ive had this unit in storage for 10 yrs never built. Never had the room. Well now I have a “small” workshop and want to give it a go. Can you “please” help with the easy peasy part. I need help wiring. I am renting the workshop space so I cannot hard wire and its 115v only. So…

What is the 240 VAC wireless remote?
Does this plug into a 115v system?
Gauge cord?
Switch?

Please help me wire this puppy.

Many thanks.

Al

- Acustic66

Good morning.

TO BEGIN WITH, I AM NOT AN ELECTRICIAN! From the sound of your message I’m guessing you are not as well and, at best, you may have limited experience with electrical circuits. PLEASE, CONSULT A PROFESSIONAL PRIOR TO WIRING THIS YOURSELF! INJURY AND/OR DEATH CAN RESULT FROM GETTING THIS WRONG, ALONG WITH THE POTENTIAL OF FIRE. Call an electrician, spend the $100-150 and get this done right.

Now let’s verify you have the same model, which is the G0532 2HP Dry Spray Booth. Also the motor on mine is the Baldor 2HP. The data plate on the side of the motor does indicate the motor can be powered with both 115/230 volt power, however; the 115 volt side runs 22 amps which is generally higher than most “normal” outlets in a home. For 115 volt operation you’ll need an outlet that’s rated at 30 amp (heavier wire, slightly different outlet and obviously a 30 amp breaker in the box). If you plug this into a 20 amp circuit I can all but guarantee you’ll be, if you’re lucky, tripping the breaker repeatedly or, if unlucky, at risk of an electrical fire.
https://flic.kr/p/2kTdC2Y

The 230 volt side of this drops the amperage requirement in half and is suitable for a 20 amp/230 circuit. 2HP is a lot of motor for a 115 volt circuit, just my opinion.

Do you have a manual for your spraybooth? If not here’s one on the innernut…
https://cdn0.grizzly.com/manuals/g0532_m.pdf

Here’s a picture of the wiring page for 115 volt operation.
https://flic.kr/p/2kTdBYb

The wires inside should be label T1, T2, T3, T4, etc. The problem with 115 volt wiring is that you’ll need to figure out which “line” (line 1 or line 2) is supposed to be the neutral wire. US standard is black-hot, white-neutral. European is brown-hot, blue-neutral. Green is always ground. You’ll see in my wiring I didn’t have to worry about that, 230 wiring uses two hots and a ground which mean the standard white/black color coding doesn’t mean anything.

Here’s my 230 volt wiring.
https://flic.kr/p/2kTf6gs

https://flic.kr/p/2kTj8Yc

https://flic.kr/p/2kTbYkW

And here’s the wiring diagram for the 230 volt operation (just for a reference to my above pictures)
https://flic.kr/p/2kTbYmx

If I HAD TO GUESS (this is simply MY GUESS, one that is coming from a non-eletrician who has flu like symptoms from getting my second covid vaccine last night…major headache right now). If I had to guess I would GUESS that blue T1 is neutral and black T5 is hot. But that is simply a guess. You’ll note in my picture T5 and T4 are wired together with the white-hot leg in my wall outlet 230 volt circuit. Remember, white in a 115 volt circuit is normally neutral, but in this case it’s hot. The other picture shows T1 wired to the black-hot leg from my wall outlet.

You’re going to need to verify which wire is neutral to the motor and which is hot, there’s no getting around that part. Perhaps a phone call to Grizzly might be of some help, I’m surprised to see the color coding isn’t better explained. You can also search the motor name and number (mine is Baldor 2HP, number CA185180, check your data plate) and search for a wiring diagram. Grizzly should have noted which line is neutral and which is hot.

I just walked out to have one more look at mine and there’s nothing that points to neutral/hot wiring. Good luck, most likely if you have it wired wrong you will just pop the breaker, or the motor will just turn backwards and blow instead of suck, but again that’s simply my guess.

As far as switching goes, there are momentary wireless switches you can purchase, Woodcraft has a few I believe. Here’s one…
https://www.woodcraft.com/products/ivac-pro-115-volt-remote-control-for-dust-collectors

Cord size, with a 22 amp draw I would suggest 10 gauge, keep the length as short as you can. 30 amp circuits run 10 gauge wiring, 20 amp run 12 gauge and I BELIEVE 15 amp can be 14 gauge (I never use 14 gauge so I really don’t know). Lowes or HD will have what you’re looking for. Remember, the chord, plug, wall outlet and breaker (including the wiring in the wall between the breaker box and the outlet) will need to be 30 amp rated or you’re risking a fire. This is the reason why bigger motors use 230 volt.

That’s it, wish I could be more help. Good luck!

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