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The Grizzly 3 HP Router Motor

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Review by bruc101 posted 12-06-2021 09:49 PM 1374 views 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
The Grizzly 3 HP Router Motor The Grizzly 3 HP Router Motor The Grizzly 3 HP Router Motor Click the pictures to enlarge them

A personal review of this router motor after using it hard for a few months.

I purchased this Griz router motor several months ago after my almost new Porter Cable crashed on me and couldn’t find anyone that would try to repair it. I did a lot of research on 3+ HP router motors before I went with this one. I decided on the Grizzly after talking to them. They told me it had a 12 month warranty and they stocked the parts for it. I didn’t get that from other vendors.

The motor is the quietest running I’ve ever owned, much quieter than the 3 1/4 HP PC. I actually like the soft start better than the PC. I like the way to dial in the speed on it much more than the PC. My router table top is 51” long. 26” wide. 3/4” melamine screwed to 3/4” plywood and there is no vibration coming from the motor. It runs very smooth and seems to have plenty of power. Running at full rpm a few times there hasn’t been any vibration and it stays quiet.

The only con I have against the motor are the collects, and then again I’ve never used any like them. Sometimes I have to pry a bit out of them. I’m going to give Grizzly a call about that.

It dropped into my Kreg router lift just as smooth as the PC did. All I had to do was adjust it per the Kreg router lift manual. Both my wife and our youngest daughter have the PC motors in their tables so just to be on the safe side of things, I’m giviing each one of them the Grizzly as part of their Christmas. They both like the quietness and dialing in the speed on it more than the PC.

-- Bruce Free Plans & Calculators https://traditionalwoodworking.org




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bruc101

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10 comments so far

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gdaveg

461 posts in 537 days


#1 posted 12-08-2021 12:37 AM

Bruce,

You might try turning the collet nut up (counter clockwise) after breaking it free, until it comes tight to the bit, put the wrenches on again and give another quarter-ish twist CCW and see if that breaks the bit free.

Maybe that will eliminate the prying on the bit. Might work, has for me in the past.

-- Dave, Vancouver, WA & Tucson, AZ

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LittleBlackDuck

8619 posts in 2156 days


#2 posted 12-08-2021 02:36 AM

Thanks for the review 101... I have a PC body and if it goes two toes up, I have a fallback to consider as my lifter won’t accept a normal router (plunge).

I don’t expect my PC to RIP(ieces) for quite a while, however, hope I can remember this suggestion before Uncle Alzhi starts SMS’ing me…

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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bruc101

1554 posts in 4877 days


#3 posted 12-08-2021 06:53 PM



Bruce,

You might try turning the collet nut up (counter clockwise) after breaking it free, until it comes tight to the bit, put the wrenches on again and give another quarter-ish twist CCW and see if that breaks the bit free.

Maybe that will eliminate the prying on the bit. Might work, has for me in the past.

- gdaveg

Thanks Dave for that info. I’ll give it a try today if the problem exist.

-- Bruce Free Plans & Calculators https://traditionalwoodworking.org

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bruc101

1554 posts in 4877 days


#4 posted 12-08-2021 07:07 PM


Thanks for the review 101... I have a PC body and if it goes two toes up, I have a fallback to consider as my lifter won t accept a normal router (plunge).

I don t expect my PC to RIP(ieces) for quite a while, however, hope I can remember this suggestion before Uncle Alzhi starts SMS ing me…

- LittleBlackDuck

I hope it doesn’t crash on you either. Until I got a lift for my table, I used a 3.25 hp plunge PC I bought in the early 90’s. I’ts definitely had a work out over the years. I also used it to fabricate 100’s of sheets of solid surface counter tops over the years.

Never done anything to it but blow the dust off of it and has never let me down. My PC 3.25 router motor was bought less than 12 months ago and crashed after about 3 months of lite use. It stopped letting me adjust the speed on it about 2 months after I got it and then one day, it started trying to jump out of my table making all kinds of noises.

Tried all the PC repair facilities and they said sorry, no can work on it, no parts for it anymore. That ended my ever buying anything PC anymore.

-- Bruce Free Plans & Calculators https://traditionalwoodworking.org

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splintergroup

6344 posts in 2557 days


#5 posted 12-08-2021 10:34 PM



Bruce,

You might try turning the collet nut up (counter clockwise) after breaking it free, until it comes tight to the bit, put the wrenches on again and give another quarter-ish twist CCW and see if that breaks the bit free.

Maybe that will eliminate the prying on the bit. Might work, has for me in the past.

- gdaveg

This ^^^

Some collets are described as “self-releasing”. My Milwaukee is that way, after the nut is loose, it’ll spin freely for a full turn or so then hit the release point where the wrenches are required for another 1/4 turn.

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bruc101

1554 posts in 4877 days


#6 posted 12-11-2021 02:51 AM

Bruce,

You might try turning the collet nut up (counter clockwise) after breaking it free, until it comes tight to the bit, put the wrenches on again and give another quarter-ish twist CCW and see if that breaks the bit free.

Maybe that will eliminate the prying on the bit. Might work, has for me in the past.

- gdaveg

This ^^^

Some collets are described as “self-releasing”. My Milwaukee is that way, after the nut is loose, it ll spin freely for a full turn or so then hit the release point where the wrenches are required for another 1/4 turn.

- splintergroup

That’s how my PC collects work. I got a call into Griz and they suggested to lightly sand the inside of the collects with some fine sand paper and do the same thing to the router cutter shafts.

I gave that a try and so far the cutters release with very little effort and slide right of the collect and slide back in with no effort.

As I stated earlier, I’ve never used any collects like these before and didn’t know what to expect. All I had to do today was unlock the collect and turn the nut until I could turn it with my fingers. Turn it about a turn and the cutter will slide right out.

After using the router motor for awhile, and hope the collect issue is resolved, I’m beginning to like the motor more every use. I really like how quiet it is and had a chance to run it at full rpm’s today. I don’t think it has the grunt the PC does but it’s doing what I call on it to do with no power problems.

I certainly appreciate and thank you guys for replying and offering your suggestions. I’ll update if I have anymore issues with it.

-- Bruce Free Plans & Calculators https://traditionalwoodworking.org

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LittleBlackDuck

8619 posts in 2156 days


#7 posted 12-11-2021 03:36 AM

Boys and Girls, this may be of some assistance. It’s the instructions from my Beall Colett Chuck,

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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bruc101

1554 posts in 4877 days


#8 posted 12-11-2021 07:06 PM


Boys and Girls, this may be of some assistance. It s the instructions from my Beall Colett Chuck,

- LittleBlackDuck

Interesting. Thanks for sharing.

-- Bruce Free Plans & Calculators https://traditionalwoodworking.org

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BertL

4 posts in 2070 days


#9 posted 12-18-2021 01:32 AM

I find that my router bits stick when fully bottomed out in the collet. Now, when I install the bit, I bottom it out, then raise it a fraction of an inch before tightening. Then, after I loosen the collet to remove the bit, I push the bit down slightly, and it frees right up for easy removal. Maybe that will work for you – without sanding.

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bruc101

1554 posts in 4877 days


#10 posted 12-18-2021 06:02 AM



I find that my router bits stick when fully bottomed out in the collet. Now, when I install the bit, I bottom it out, then raise it a fraction of an inch before tightening. Then, after I loosen the collet to remove the bit, I push the bit down slightly, and it frees right up for easy removal. Maybe that will work for you – without sanding.

- BertL

Thanks for the info. I’ll give that a try tomorrow.

-- Bruce Free Plans & Calculators https://traditionalwoodworking.org

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