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I really like this stuff.

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Review by leftcoaster posted 11-22-2021 08:53 PM 746 views 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
I really like this stuff. I really like this stuff. I really like this stuff. Click the pictures to enlarge them

I have always hated finishing. Coat after coat of polyurethane, hours to dissolve shellac, setting up spray tents, the fumes, drips, having to do a piece twice in order to reach both sides – ugh. I can see why pro’s sub contract this out.

My local hardwood dealer has Odie’s on an endcap. They also have Rubio. The clerk (do people still say that?) said he had used Odie’s, found it simpler, and liked the results.

This stuff is the bomb. You can sand to whatever grit or, as I try to do, use a finish plane instead of sanding. Rub in a small amount, wait 10 minutes → 3 hours, buff it off and you’re done.

Spot repairs. – easy. I had a test piece for that. I no longer know where the repair is.

I’ve done furniture and other things. I just knocked out the items displayed here (and another too) in like 90 minutes including the wait time.

So this is now my go to. In six months I will probably be selling my HVLP.

I am looking into solutions for removing air when this is stored. I’m not crazy about the Bloxygen idea but I’m sure that works fine.

Oh one issue – it is food safe and recommended for cutting boards. BUT your client would need Odie’s for maintaining the board (confirmed with Odie’s by phone). Sorry, but no one I know is going to keep a jar of Odie’s and bloxygen around unless they are a woodworker. And in that case they will make their own cutting board.




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leftcoaster

443 posts in 2160 days



11 comments so far

View Buck_Thorne's profile

Buck_Thorne

139 posts in 2355 days


#1 posted 11-22-2021 11:55 PM

I’ve looked at the stuff, and put it down like a hot potato when I saw the price tag. Is it really worth it?

You mentioned the difficulties of poly varnish and shellac… I don’t understand why you find those so difficult, but have you tried spray lacquer? Have you tried canned (Bullseye) shellac? Danish Oil? A linseed oil/beeswax blend? Is Odie’s really that much better?

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leftcoaster

443 posts in 2160 days


#2 posted 11-23-2021 12:10 AM



I ve looked at the stuff, and put it down like a hot potato when I saw the price tag. Is it really worth it?

You mentioned the difficulties of poly varnish and shellac… I don t understand why you find those so difficult, but have you tried spray lacquer? Have you tried canned (Bullseye) shellac? Danish Oil? A linseed oil/beeswax blend? Is Odie s really that much better?

Yes I’ve used all of those. Yes it is that much better. Yes, to me, it’s worth it. Here’s why:

shellac: I am keeping this one in my quiver. It’s easy to use and dries quickly. You do need multiple coats and it’s not tough enough for a lot of purposes. Nevertheless, it is very practical and the colors available or numerous so long as you plan to make the solution sufficiently far in advance.

Oils are not protective in any meaningful sense. Likewise beeswax. They are sticky and you have to deal with dust nibs.

I have a 9 ounce jar of Odie’s oil. With that I have finished a very large sideboard with 10 drawers, half a dozen picture frames, the boxes depicted here, and a few other things. I still have half a jar left. I have wasted zero material pouring setting or leaving some behind in a spray gun to clean out at the end of the session.

Most importantly, I have spent a lot less time finishing. No sanding between coats and worrying about dust nibs, etc. Instead i just move onto the next project .

I will not be buying filters or spray suits and not nearly as many gloves. This stuff actually smells nice.

They are having a Black Friday sale right now. I put a jar in my shopping cart and forgot about it. The next day I got an email with an additional 10% off coupon so I purchased a few: that should hold me over for the next year or so.

View SteveMI's profile

SteveMI

1170 posts in 4578 days


#3 posted 11-23-2021 01:48 AM

I bought some but haven’t used it. Several friends use it almost exclusively and have said you use very little and rub it in. It started out as a finish for concrete floors in industrial places. Now it is used on hardwood floors due to its hardness and protective features.
And it really pops the grain and is a silky finish from seeing other peoples projects.

View Thedustydutchman's profile

Thedustydutchman

137 posts in 191 days


#4 posted 11-23-2021 02:02 AM

How does this stand up to moisture? I’m currently an arm r seal user and would like something that doesn’t stink up the place forever while finishing.

-- Jerry H - Holland Michigan

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leftcoaster

443 posts in 2160 days


#5 posted 11-23-2021 02:42 AM



How does this stand up to moisture? I m currently an arm r seal user and would like something that doesn t stink up the place forever while finishing.

- Thedustydutchman

It’s used for flooring and exterior projects. Web site says it “resists” moisture. I’d look there for more.

View iminmyshop's profile

iminmyshop

395 posts in 3278 days


#6 posted 11-26-2021 03:03 AM

Thanks for the review. On their website, it is recommended to clean and refresh the finish if it looks dull with their cleaner concentrate. At around $45/bottle, that is not something I would recommend to a customer. Has anyone with experience with this product found something else to refresh the finish with?

-- http://www.alansfinewoodworking.com/

View sansoo22's profile

sansoo22

1879 posts in 938 days


#7 posted 11-26-2021 11:56 PM



Thanks for the review. On their website, it is recommended to clean and refresh the finish if it looks dull with their cleaner concentrate. At around $45/bottle, that is not something I would recommend to a customer. Has anyone with experience with this product found something else to refresh the finish with?

- iminmyshop

Their cleaner while pricey up front is a concentrate. For refreshing their oil finish its a 1:99 ratio. If I did my math right the 32 oz jar of concentrate could make 24.75 gallons of cleaner at a 1:99 ratio which breaks down to $1.79 a gallon.

View drogsod's profile

drogsod

130 posts in 1079 days


#8 posted 11-28-2021 05:49 PM

Thanks for the review. I’m going to try it on my next furniture project. Pricey but that’s a secondary consideration for me if it works and saves finishing time.

View Andre's profile

Andre

4827 posts in 3090 days


#9 posted 11-28-2021 11:45 PM

Sounds like OSMO? what is the Difference?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View iminmyshop's profile

iminmyshop

395 posts in 3278 days


#10 posted 11-29-2021 12:08 AM

Someone did a video comparing Osmo and Odie’s. Odie’s did amazingly well in resisting stains compared to Osmo.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4OkL6Ec63aU

Here is a discussion on the Festool user’s group. Some people love it others found it to be inconsistent in terms of how it held up.
https://www.festoolownersgroup.com/finishing/odie's-oil/

-- http://www.alansfinewoodworking.com/

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iminmyshop

395 posts in 3278 days


#11 posted 11-29-2021 12:28 AM

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