LumberJocks

Not Perfect, but pretty close for me + Great Customer Service

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Review by whope posted 07-19-2021 11:19 PM 1252 views 0 times favorited 19 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Not Perfect, but pretty close for me + Great Customer Service Not Perfect, but pretty close for me + Great Customer Service Not Perfect, but pretty close for me + Great Customer Service Click the pictures to enlarge them

I’d give it a 4.5. I rounded up for the excellent customer service.

This is my third dust collector. The machine I replaced was a Jet DC-1100VX that I’d had for just a few years. My first was a Delta that Lowes was selling for cheap. I’ll mention up front that when I upgraded to the Harvey, I also added 6” metal ducting which I’m sure had a big impact on performance. But it should, I spent about the same in ducting as I did for the G700 (about $2,500, including shipping).

Also note, when thinking about fixing my dust collection, I was considering a home-built chip separator for the steel garbage can (in place of the plastic one). But that was a lot of work for no guarantee of better dust collection. I had at one point decided to get the Oneida V-System 3000, but switched to the G700. I’ll give the reason why later.

Things I like:
- Much better suction (than what I had) and easily keeps up with my planer
- Different Noise profile (lower pitch than my Jet) and fairly quiet at low speeds
- Variable speed
- Integrated remote
- Short (no need to rework my shop, shorter than the sliding table height of my Hammer B3)
- Easy bag cleanout
- Self-clean-out (closed loop)

Things I don’t like:
- The dust caps on the clean-out ports are a bit finicky to get sealed
- Power switch in the back (very minor)
- Can’t adjust the speed when the unit isn’t running

It’s a solidly built unit all around, except the dust clean-out ports. Easily mobile which isn’t a plus in my shop as I don’t have aisle ways wide enough to push around. Since I went with metal ducts, not an advantage.

There are a number of YouTubers who’ve given glowing reviews of the G700. And for good reason, they received a G700 for free. They always talk about how quiet it is. At low speed (about 4000), yes it’s quiet. But at the speeds you’d likely be using (5500 – 6500), not so much. But the pitch is lower, so it’s not as hard on the ears. I’d still wear ear protection at higher speeds.

The nice this is the variable speed. When using my planer or jointer at 6500, I would overload the G700. But dial it back to 5500, and that problem mostly goes away. The max speed is 7500 and I don’t expect to be using that unless I’m using the self-clean-out feature.

Customer service is top-notch. I broke one of the flappers for one of the pleated filters and Harvey shipped out a replacement without hesitation.

The main reason I went with the Harvey G700 over the Oneida system is that I’d lose some storage space mounting the Oneida system on the wall. While the floor footprint of the G700 is bigger, it’s very short.

There are more details in my video.

-- Measure it with a micrometer, mark it with chalk, cut it with a Hammer.




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whope

254 posts in 3604 days



19 comments so far

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Redoak49

5321 posts in 3147 days


#1 posted 07-20-2021 01:53 AM

Interesting but at $2700 it is expensive

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EarlS

4623 posts in 3506 days


#2 posted 07-20-2021 12:52 PM



Interesting but at $2700 it is expensive

- Redoak49

I bought the Oneida Supercell since it hung on the wall, had a small footprint (about the size of a built-in central vac for a house), and did double duty as a DC and shop vac. It was similarly priced. I looked at the Harvey, but floor space was an issue for me since I couldn’t tuck it under anything.

My point – good DC systems are not cheap. However, as the Oneida rep asked: How much $$ have you spent on dust collectors that didn’t work for you?

I’d be interested to see how the Harvey performs over the next couple of months. Maybe you can post a follow-up.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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whope

254 posts in 3604 days


#3 posted 07-20-2021 04:49 PM



Interesting but at $2700 it is expensive

- Redoak49

Indeed it is. Nobody likes spending money on equipment that doesn’t directly produce something. Given that it is the most used machine in my shop, a good investment should be made.

Would the Jet have been sufficient with metal ducting? Perhaps. But that would have still left the metal trashcan chip collector in the loop that needed constant attention.

They occasionally reduce it to about $2200 if you’re on their mailing list, which is about the same price as the V-3000 unit.

As everyone says: Buy once, cry once. Having this and the ductwork installed has made it nicer to work in the shop. No more dragging the plastic hose from machine to machine. It does shut off when the bag gets full, so I’m not constantly checking, or forgetting to check, the chip level.

-- Measure it with a micrometer, mark it with chalk, cut it with a Hammer.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7552 posts in 1979 days


#4 posted 07-21-2021 08:13 AM

Thanks for the post whope... I have my dusty stuff covered and it’s not by me grovelling to SWMBO… I have a swag of Dust Deputies, a few Marshalls and some Police Officers on my payroll to keep my workshop dust free.

Nevertheless, the more diversified stuff we know about, the better decisions we can make in the future. If Henry was worried about the costs, Holden would rule the market (ya gotta be an Aussie).
Interesting that often the first reaction to many products is the shekels… Hell, if I was intimidated, I’d never buy a Fe$tool… I love ‘em and I’m not rich (sorry Rich (if you read this), but you’re no duck either)...

Still, I gotta have a go at this “box”... where’s the wheels?... if it don’t move it sucks... and not in a complimentary way. The only thing that should not move in a workshop is the fridge... so one always knows where it is.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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whope

254 posts in 3604 days


#5 posted 07-21-2021 09:23 AM

The unit has wheels and is easy to move. There are two adjustable feet on the motor end.


Thanks for the post whope... I have my dusty stuff covered and it s not by me grovelling to SWMBO… I have a swag of Dust Deputies, a few Marshalls and some Police Officers on my payroll to keep my workshop dust free.

Still, I gotta have a go at this “box”... where s the wheels?... if it don t move it sucks... and not in a complimentary way. The only thing that should not move in a workshop is the fridge... so one always knows where it is.

- LittleBlackDuck


-- Measure it with a micrometer, mark it with chalk, cut it with a Hammer.

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LittleBlackDuck

7552 posts in 1979 days


#6 posted 07-21-2021 11:20 AM

Congrats whope,

you’ve landed a spam…

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7419 posts in 2546 days


#7 posted 07-21-2021 12:43 PM

You comment that it is still pretty loud but in your video, it appears that you are speaking live at only a slight raised voice and not dubbing during the edit. There are not too many dust collectors where you could still be heard over the machine so that is a great improvement in my book.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View CL810's profile

CL810

4157 posts in 4146 days


#8 posted 07-23-2021 05:23 PM

I would like to hear how the filters hold up. I spoke with them a while back and, IF my memory is right, they told me they would have to be replaced every 6-12 months. Hope you can post a follow up down the road.

-- "The only limits to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today." - FDR

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whope

254 posts in 3604 days


#9 posted 07-24-2021 10:46 AM



I would like to hear how the filters hold up. I spoke with them a while back and, IF my memory is right, they told me they would have to be replaced every 6-12 months. Hope you can post a follow up down the road.

That would be pretty disappointing as they aren’t cheap and would be a bit of a pain to replace. I will definitely follow-up if that is the case.

-- Measure it with a micrometer, mark it with chalk, cut it with a Hammer.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

7419 posts in 2546 days


#10 posted 07-24-2021 12:17 PM

The filters appear to be similar to the other canister filters out there. If it truly does do a better job of separating the large chips and fine dust than other separators it seems like the filter would last longer.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

3647 posts in 4103 days


#11 posted 07-25-2021 11:02 PM

With a collector that looks like that, who cares if it works. It’s just dang purty.

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

719 posts in 3373 days


#12 posted 07-27-2021 02:33 AM

I’ve been thinking about one of these units for the form factor and relative noise level, but I found it curious that slowing the unit down improved the separation?

Is this just an issue with that particular combination of tools or will high speed always generate a higher level of chip carry through the separation section? Have you tried it on high speed with other tools?

Thanks,
Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

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whope

254 posts in 3604 days


#13 posted 07-27-2021 03:53 PM

It can seem counterintuitive. Think of it like chugging a glass of water. There’s going to be a maximum on how fast you can take it in. If it came from a firehose, then you’d be overwhelmed.

But at some point, if the speed is too low it won’t collect chips out of the machine. I’m finding 5500 is a good speed for the planer. But if I went to something wider than 8”, I might want to dial it back some more. Right now, I’m experimenting. At least that’s an option on this unit. Overloading may be less of an issue with an upright unit. Someone who has one of those might be able to speak to it.

I wouldn’t ask the G700 to take chips from a jointer and a planer at the same time. Maybe one of those and my TS would be fine (although I don’t have enough 220 to do that right now).

I have run it on the top speed from the Hammer, but the chip load from that is much lower & finer.

The manual recommends the highest speed when performing a self-cleaning, but I’ve found that if you overloaded the machine during use, it will overload it during cleaning.


I ve been thinking about one of these units for the form factor and relative noise level, but I found it curious that slowing the unit down improved the separation?

Is this just an issue with that particular combination of tools or will high speed always generate a higher level of chip carry through the separation section? Have you tried it on high speed with other tools?

Thanks,
Mike

- MikeDS


-- Measure it with a micrometer, mark it with chalk, cut it with a Hammer.

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whope

254 posts in 3604 days


#14 posted 07-27-2021 03:55 PM

If you’re thinking about getting a unit, get on their mailing list and visit the G700 webpage occasionally. I would occasionally get an offer on a price between $2100 & $2200, which is when I ordered it.

-- Measure it with a micrometer, mark it with chalk, cut it with a Hammer.

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

719 posts in 3373 days


#15 posted 07-27-2021 04:30 PM

Appreciate the review and information. I went back and spent some time looking at the unit again thinking about the way it works.

It makes some sense that higher airflow (i.e. higher speed) could entrain more chips into the second stage as the initial double cone separation has a low axial component, so you’re essentially relying on inertia as the chips displace around the initial cone to overcome the pull of air back into the second stage. Then in the second stage you are getting the strong axial component as the air comes across the vanes and strong rotation is created.

Now that you’ve been using it, what is the fine dust collection like in the second bag? When running a table saw, etc are you getting a good catch on the fine “flour” dust in the second bag?

One more question is whether the primary intake has any kind of baffle on it to prevent ingestion of large scrap? I’m not worried about the primary fan, but it looks like a pain to take apart to retrieve a large piece of scrap too big to get through the centrifugal section.

Thanks,
Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

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