LumberJocks

Air from a battery...

  • Advertise with us
Review by LittleBlackDuck posted 04-26-2021 01:38 PM 755 views 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Air from a battery... Air from a battery... Air from a battery... Click the pictures to enlarge them

Boys and Girls,

Abandoning my Fe$tool fetish, I decided to stick with green and spruik the latest addition to my Ryobi collection.

This is something that will never replace a decent compressor or even an indecent small(ish) one, however, if you did not think you needed a large one and your anticipated requirement could not justify one… and if you are space constrained, this may be a compromising option.

Because of it’s small tank capacity (3.7L… or 1 gal in crazy measurements), I could not justify anything more than a somewhat generous 3 stars and because of its limiting use, I would consider it an unnecessary “luxury”. Don’t be fooled, the low score is lack of versatility… I’d give it 5 stars for small, dedicated performance.

Now many woodies have a NOISY (sorry for shouting) compressor, and those that don’t, have convinced themselves they don’t need one… If you were in the dark about the merit of compressors, you’d probably not given it a second thought of why any fool would want one.
If you happen to be identified as one of those fools (SWMBOs are great confirmers) and happen to own a menagerie of Ryobi batteries, this may be of interest for the times when you don’t need a tornado but the simple gust of a well developed fart… If you don’t have Ryobi batteries, buy one, and you’ve just qualified.

I’ve often needed a quick burst of air but lacked the daily diet of onions and beans, and subsequently it was with chagrin that I turned on my largish compressor (with leaky hoses), only to leave the shop till the 80L tank filled and I could again return to hear my creaky bones rattle in the workshop. Though I have a light to indicate that the compressor is on

(on the same circuit), I can’t see in the dark and when I go to bed I forget to turn it off and have it come to life in the middle of the night, sending the neighbour dog into a barking frenzy which then wakes everyone up, resulting in a barrage of cuss words towards my direction.

I also upgraded my palm nailer to a Milwaukee battery operated one to get at my balustrades that my compressor’s configuration could not reach and the gaps were too small for the Plaslode cordless framing gun. Unfortunately the Milwaukee Palm nailer with the battery was a tad too bulky for efficient operation… did work but did not appease a man determined, while not destined, for a convenient life.

When I saw this cordless compressor in Bunnings, I initially baulked until I saw a promotional Ryobi video using an air brush driven by the cordless compressor… it was VISA’d the next day.

Unfortunately those Ryobi mongrels (sorry canines) didn’t provide any info on the hassles I will face with adapting a small air brush (and associated 4mm air hose) to the full sized Nitto fitting of the Ryobi.

As I was too impatient waiting for the reply from Ryobi about adaptation, after a bit of stuffing around I came up with this combination of adapter upon adapter upon adapter,

Not that I’m bragging about how clever I am, or trying to get a free tool out of Ryobi, I thought I’d mention this in case some other gumby like me tries to venture down the same path.

I’m not going to do the unboxing and a full function test, however, I will mention some of the handy things I can see this being used.

The compressor has two dials,

The one on the left is the PSI of the tank.. It takes about 1.5 mins to reach max 120PSI from 0 and refill cutin is around 90PSI with about 25 secs for full topup. The dial on the right is the pressure fed to the tool and is controlled by the middle knob.

Some of its salient features that helps to endear it to me:-
  1. Portability into the house for some air brushing… now ib all fairness, I have a small electric compressor

    for the air brush

    and could have stuck with that (and probably will), however, it is definitely a one show pony and this Ryobi may convince viewers, that have hesitated in the past of buying and using an air brush for some of their small projects…
    While air brushes are designed to be able to be used with canned compressed air, a large compressor inside a house will usually lack SWMBO approval.
    After amassing sufficient adaptors I loaded the air brush with some water,

    and kept it running for a few minutes before the refill level was tripped.
  2. Can drive in about 5 or 6 16ga brad nails


    for those quick fixes/glue-ups, before the battery needs to cut in again. Nevertheless when the compressor cuts in, it can keep up with continual nailing this small gauge.
  3. Can drive a palm nailer…

    might only handle one nail at a time,

    however, you’re not gonna build a house with it and you don’t need a compressor on the end of a long hosed gun.
  4. Quick burst of direct air

    that a shop blower is too generic for.
  5. And its bloody easy to bleed,

I feel it’s two major features are a small footprint combined with portability. There is no need for a long hose.

While this compressor may be hard to justify if you already have a larger compressor, it could be an entry level for those occasions/people that do not require/own a full blown compressor… or those eager to part with their hard earned shekels.

The convenience of battery driven and light weight (7.4kg with a large battery) makes it usable in places that a large tank compressor would fear to tread. It can easily be tossed in the boot of the car… and no need for a long hose.

I haven’t tried this with any heavy duty air tools as I have a large compressor with 30m+ hose, however, one review I blundered across stated that it can remove 5 vehicle nuts using a rattle gun before “refilling”. I am sceptical, but if this is true it’s a bonus… I’m guessing it’s just to loosen each and then manually unthread the rest.
I did try it with a cut-off wheel,

For anyone that hates reading as much as I do, I can save you the effort and guide you to an equally boring video that verifies the existence of Murphy.

Keep safe, jocks... and your jocks, safe!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD




View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1902 days



14 comments so far

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

3860 posts in 4519 days


#1 posted 04-26-2021 02:56 PM

So, I read the whole article and I might have missed it but…What is the tank capacity. That’s sort of important. I’ve got a 3 gallon and it can keep up with my framing nailer.

You mentioned how many nail hits it can do before restarting but it’s more important to me how long the battery lasts. If it will put in 5 finish nails before recycling but will do that a hundred times that’s sort of important info.

The tank size tells you if there will be wait time. and the time that it will run will let me know how much I can actually do with it. If the tank is large enough to not have to wait and the battery will keep it going and hour, then it would be a good thing. Can you include that info if you’ve got it?

Thanx.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1902 days


#2 posted 04-26-2021 10:38 PM

Good point Crafty... The tank has a 3.7L (1 gal) capacity… which contributed to the lower rating.
Thanks for the heads-up… will/have updated my prattle above.

I won’t insult you by suggesting you suffer the ordeal of my video, however, after an air blast, brad nail and “countless” failures at palm nailing demos, a 5AH battery gave up the ghost. Unfortunately during the video shoot I used a dodgy short hose with heaps of leakages… connections without a tool at the other end (only tool was trying to attach a tool) I went through two batteries (5AH), however, through “abuse”, it was recharging most of the time.
I do have a swag of Ryobi li-ion batteries, so I wasn’t keeping a critical tag of usage and didn’t strive to limit battery wastage.

Thanks

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

2651 posts in 1669 days


#3 posted 04-26-2021 11:08 PM

Luv it!

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View RCCinNC's profile

RCCinNC

500 posts in 1408 days


#4 posted 04-28-2021 03:20 PM

Not sure how I feel about the compressor…not something needed in my particular wheelhouse…but the review was priceless LBD! Thanks!

-- Live to putter...putter to live!

View James E McIntyre's profile

James E McIntyre

1267 posts in 2373 days


#5 posted 04-28-2021 03:28 PM

Good review Duck. And no I did not read all of it all but I did get to the part where you mentioned 3.7 liter capacity. That is tiny. But it does look like a good one.

When I started collecting battery tools I bought a Dewalt drill. Now I’m locked into Dewalt so I can use the batteries in different tools.

You must be doing that with Ryobi tools.

-- James E McIntyre

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2925 posts in 1244 days


#6 posted 04-28-2021 10:01 PM

it may be attractive in the Off Road RV world where you have to lower the air pressure
in your vehicle tires down to about 18 psi for beach cruising or rock crawling.

-- there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks. --

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1902 days


#7 posted 04-29-2021 12:21 AM

I thank all that have sacrificed their precious time to read, even if only to come in and leave disgusted after the first sentence… and any efforts to comment makes my posting worthwhile (at least to me).


... not something needed in my particular wheelhouse…
- RCCinNC
RCCinNC, No argument from this LBDinChurchill... Nevertheless I feel there’s a difference between need and convenience...
For millions of years, from the smallest dionasaur to about 150 years before today’s C19 dodgers never needed a car… and before you say they never existed, nor did these.

Hopefully just making the convenience seekers aware… I can lead a horse to water, but that bloody badger will charge by the litre.


..... When I started collecting battery tools I bought a Dewalt drill. Now I’m locked into Dewalt so I can use the batteries in different tools.

You must be doing that with Ryobi tools.
- James E McIntyre


Only people locked in are the lawbreakers… if we ever manage to find a rational judge prepared to impose mandatory sentencing.

I have a swag of Ryobi, but moreso because they have released a swag of diversified tools for my occasional requirements.
If I need a serious tool, I do not let my lack of batteries govern my purchase… and once you buy one, you can’t use “no battery” as an excuse… though I do insist on the convenience of backup batteries which would be a disincentive for many.
I have cordless Milwaukee (M12 & M18), DeWALT (M12), Fe$tool, Ryobi and don’t tell pottzy, even some Bos¢h… and even some you have never heard off for those one off occasions where no other (branded) is available.


it may be attractive in the Off Road RV world where you have to lower the air pressure
in your vehicle tires down to about 18 psi for beach cruising or rock crawling.
- John Smith

Thanks JS for thinking outside the square.
I have a dedicated cordless tyre pump permanently resident in the boot of my car, however, if I didn’t have one this would be a viable alternative.
Nevertheless, your suggestion gives the unit another practical (safety) use in the car rather than just for emergencies.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

6554 posts in 2296 days


#8 posted 04-29-2021 01:55 AM

+1

-- Desert_Woodworker

View moke's profile

moke

1759 posts in 3858 days


#9 posted 04-29-2021 05:20 PM

Great review Ducky…..I have had one for about a year now, and have found a mirad of uses…..
The low tires on some implements in my shed after winter
-pumping up small tire that a large compressor would have burst…(hand truck type tires)
-used while constructing my new shop before it had power
-and taking it with me several blocks to pump up the kid next doors flat tire, cause why would you want a spare?

Great buy…..will it replace a large compressor? One need only to look at it to answer that question. Is it worthless?
Certainly not.

Great review LBD…now buy on of those 40v (or 36 in AU?) post hole diggers. I need to know if they are any good.

-- Mike

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1902 days


#10 posted 04-30-2021 01:07 AM



....I have had one for about a year now, and have found a mirad of uses…..
The low tires on some implements in my shed after winter
- moke

One year ago???... hell, it just got release here in Australia… while one can say you Yanks are way ahead of us, I’d prefer to refer to it as… we are just a beaten by a nose, second.

I actually have dedicated tyre inflators,

Even though I bought these before this compressor was released, I doubt if I’d carry the compressor (albeit light and small) permanently in the car.
I still carry the Ryobi one permanently in the car.
Recently I purchased the Milwaukee one, which I rate much better than the Ryobi. Unfortunately I have far too many tyres around the house (wheel barrow, trolleys, ride-on, balls (bouncing type)) so the Milwaukee is back in it’s workshop residence.
I bought the Milwaukee as a replacement for the Ryobi as the latter doesn’t have a trigger lock and rapid acceleration and breaking would move it around in the boot and accidentally turn it on and have inadvertently flattened the battery… as I didn’t like the loose battery flopping around, it was always attached. Fortunately I always carry an old Ryobi cordless saw,

in the boot (with battery attached) for those lumber pick ups when it wont fit into the car and the vendor wont cut (MDF vendors are often guilty)... actually quite funny as while cutting other customers have asked to borrow (ok, once).

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View moke's profile

moke

1759 posts in 3858 days


#11 posted 04-30-2021 01:43 PM

LBD-I have the old blue version of the tire infiltrator. I am not sure I have ever seen anything quite as slow. I never thought of carrying around a saw for impromptu wood purchases either! I could I have a couple!
It surprises me that u guys (Aussies) just got the compressor. I always thought that Ryobi came out with stuff over there before we got it!

-- Mike

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1902 days


#12 posted 04-30-2021 02:05 PM


... old blue version of the tire infiltrator. I am not sure I have ever seen anything quite as slow….
- moke

Never thought about timing the green one… but was pissed off with no trigger lock so I had to depress the trigger and watch the dial. With the Milwaukee (a serious inflator) I just set the required pressure, press a button, walk away and poof it’s blown up.

.... I never thought of carrying around a saw for impromptu wood purchases either!...
- moke

I have carried one in the boot for about 14 years. I used to go to a timber yard called Tile Importers... they specialised in seconds and really had bugger all timber knowledge (their name is a dead giveaway)... Unfortunately they would not cut, even to shorten boards and would only provide a blunt hand saw for DIY. I quickly learnt to slap the saw in my boot and eventually kept it there… and still do.

... It surprises me that u guys (Aussies) just got the compressor. I always thought that Ryobi came out with stuff over there before we got it!
- moke

Can’t confirm when it was actually released in Australia, however, in the rural region I live in, it was made available about 3 months ago… I first baulked till I saw it being used with an air-brush a few days ago… while I didn’t need it for the air-brush, I appreciated it’s potential… similar to my 3D printer that I bought at a wood show… when I saw it I immediately realised it’s potential for the workshop.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

View moke's profile

moke

1759 posts in 3858 days


#13 posted 05-01-2021 05:13 PM

LBD—
I am glad you live in Austrailia….while I would love to see ur shop and toys, I am afraid I would go broke trying to keep up with the ducks!!!

-- Mike

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7076 posts in 1902 days


#14 posted 05-02-2021 01:41 AM



LBD—
I am glad you live in Austrailia….while I would love to see ur shop and toys, I am afraid I would go broke trying to keep up with the ducks!!!

- moke


Actually you wouldn’t… I have a lot of crap that I’m not too ashamed to admit to. If I added up all the tools I would recommend to anyone that may need them, the list may be short, albeit a tad pricey due to my Fe$tool and Woodpecker$... the Ryobi are basically window dressing that dabbles with the trimmings.

Now as for all the crap… I should install a dunny in the workshop.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com