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Lays Down a Beautiful Off-the-Gun Finish

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Review by pintodeluxe posted 03-15-2021 08:32 PM 1004 views 1 time favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Lays Down a Beautiful Off-the-Gun Finish Lays Down a Beautiful Off-the-Gun Finish Lays Down a Beautiful Off-the-Gun Finish Click the pictures to enlarge them

YouTube video of the Fuji LX-20 in action… https://youtu.be/p27iiv0Ufh8

For those of you familiar with spray equipment, here is a great HVLP gun that gives superb Off-the-Gun finishes. I’ve used lots of HVLP conversion guns over the years, and had success with some. This LX-20 is on another level. Usually, I have to wet sand my final topcoat, but this thing sprays great right off the gun. It’s fantastic to skip a step when it comes to furniture finishing!
Fit and finish are excellent right out of the box. The extra-large mixing chamber just below the gravity cup must be key to good fluid flow. Atomization of lacquer was excellent with the standard 1.4mm nozzle and tip set. 1.2mm and 1.7mm sets are also available, in fact they were all included with my gun. I thin pre-cat lacquer about 15-20 percent and it lays down beautifully. Gone are the days of 6-7 coats wiped on by hand. Two coats with this HVLP are all you need. I’d like to see a head-to-head of the LX-20 against some of Fuji’s Turbine systems. Very impressed.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush




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pintodeluxe

6344 posts in 3865 days



11 comments so far

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James E McIntyre

1188 posts in 2344 days


#1 posted 03-16-2021 05:10 PM

Thanks for this review. If I ever get a spray system I’ll get this one.

I’ve been using minwax poly spray in can for things I can spray outside. I have to sand with 320 grit between coats. 3 coats works well. But I’m still stuck with poly wipe-on for indoor cabinets I’m redesigning when I don’t want to seal off the hole room.

Can polyurethane be used in the XL-20?

Do you find lacquer as tough as poly products?

-- James E McIntyre

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pintodeluxe

6344 posts in 3865 days


#2 posted 03-16-2021 05:22 PM


Thanks for this review. If I ever get a spray system I’ll get this one.

I’ve been using minwax poly spray in can for things I can spray outside. I have to sand with 320 grit between coats. 3 coats works well. But I’m still stuck with poly wipe-on for indoor cabinets I’m redesigning when I don’t want to seal off the hole room.

Can polyurethane be used in the XL-20?

Do you find lacquer as tough as poly products?

- James E McIntyre

Hi James,
Yes you can spray poly with the LX-20 HVLP. Depending on the thickness of the finish, and how much you want to thin it, you might use a different nozzle size. Pre-cat lacquer is what I prefer, and for that I use the standard 1.4mm tip. But I also have the 1.2mm and 1.7mm needle / nozzle sets. I do spray poly for exterior door applications, but it doesn’t come up that often in my work. If you’re spraying poly right out of the can (not thinned), I would start with the 1.7mm needle / nozzle and go from there.

Best of luck with all your projects.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Mosquito

11032 posts in 3344 days


#3 posted 03-16-2021 06:32 PM

I appreciate the review. This is something I’ve recently started looking at as well, changing over from a turbine style to a a gun like this. I’ll have to add this one to my list to research.

 

I just wanted to point one thing out, however. I don’t want this little tid-bit to go overlooked:

For those of you familiar with spray equipment, [...]. I’ve used lots of HVLP conversion guns over the years

A spray gun, while simple in nature, is a complicated thing wherein the operator has to get a number of things all dialed in from regulating air pressure, filtering material, needle/nozzle sides, spraying technique, etc… don’t think that just because Pinto likes it and thinks that it lays a perfect finish means that someone just getting in to it will be able to pick it up, jam it on an air hose and get a perfect finish out of the box… Be prepared to fiddle and get it figured out a bit first :-)

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

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James E McIntyre

1188 posts in 2344 days


#4 posted 03-16-2021 07:44 PM

I watched the video. Very professional.

Are you Willie Sandry?

-- James E McIntyre

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pintodeluxe

6344 posts in 3865 days


#5 posted 03-16-2021 07:52 PM



I watched the video. Very professional.

Are you Willie Sandry?

- James E McIntyre

Yes Sir.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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James E McIntyre

1188 posts in 2344 days


#6 posted 03-16-2021 08:00 PM

Your a born video personality.
Love your work.

How did you cut the bevels on the ends of rails of the frame?

I use a band saw or a disc sander.
Yours look great.

-- James E McIntyre

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pintodeluxe

6344 posts in 3865 days


#7 posted 03-16-2021 08:11 PM



Your a born video personality.
Love your work.

How did you cut the bevels on the ends of rails of the frame?

I use a band saw or a disc sander.
Yours look great.

- James E McIntyre

Thank you so much.
I actually use an oscillating belt sander to bevel the ends of the frame.
I do the same thing for through tenons. If you have a tilting table and a miter gauge it works like magic.
A very coarse 50 grit belt does the bulk of the work, then I hit it quickly at 80 and 120.
If you ever get a chance to try it that way, it really works great.

Take care.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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James E McIntyre

1188 posts in 2344 days


#8 posted 03-16-2021 08:17 PM

Thanks for the tip. I don’t have one yet.
Now I wish I bought the ridged oscillating belt sander instead of just the oscillating drum sander

-- James E McIntyre

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hokieman

202 posts in 4806 days


#9 posted 03-29-2021 08:34 PM

Quite pricey at three to four hundred bucks. It oughta be good.

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pintodeluxe

6344 posts in 3865 days


#10 posted 03-29-2021 09:24 PM



Quite pricey at three to four hundred bucks. It oughta be good.

- hokieman

I thought that at first glance too. Then I considered that I had been dealing with overspray on my last gun for 20 years. This gun lays down such a nice finish that the second coat needs no additional scuff sanding or buffing of any kind. There’s actually a lot of engineering that goes into a gun that can finely atomize woodworking finishes. Cheap guns look the part, but aren’t always up to the task.

Believe me, I have a cabinet full of HVLP guns that I used once and never again. There’s a cost to that as well.

Anyway, when considering the stainless steel passages, extra needle and nozzle sets, and superb finish, my thought is it represents a premium product at a fair price. It probably won’t be a newcomer’s first gun, but it could certainly be your last.

Best of luck!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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splintergroup

4969 posts in 2274 days


#11 posted 03-29-2021 09:50 PM



Quite pricey at three to four hundred bucks. It oughta be good.

- hokieman

Yep, that’s the entrance fee for higher end equipment. I’ve had good/lower dollar guns that would occasionally spit and ruin a finish. I see that price point as a perfect fit for wood working use. Certainly not the cost for the Rolls-Royce equipment, but well within everyone else’s luxury lineup. Something you can put to use without worrying about what it will mess up, only what you will mess up.

Nothing wrong with cheaper equipment if you only use it rarely or your projects are small enough that you don’t need many minutes of flawless spray. Some finishes will come out great with most any equipment.

With many tools, the price goes up linearly with higher quality/precision. With spray equipment, it’s almost exponential, however there is a bunch of voodoo magic in machining a sprayer that performs to higher standards.

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