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Post Assembly Impressions--Even Before My First Cut!

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Review by jayseedub posted 12-24-2020 09:49 PM 1417 views 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Post Assembly Impressions--Even Before My First Cut! No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

Just some initial reactions about this saw, now that it’s assembled and fresh in my mind:

1) It’s HEAVY. I don’t even have the cast iron wings—and it’s heavy in the box, heavy to carry in, heavy to install. Get it? It’s heavy.

2) The stamped steel extension wings are thin. Thinner than my old Ridgid 2412 from 20 years ago. Thin. But it doesn’t matter. Once they’re bolted to the fence system and the side extension table they feel thick(ish).

3) I love assembling things. Love it. Love Ikea stuff. This one was not ideal—but also not terrible. I had some issues with getting the actual saw top to line up with the base’s holes—even though I thought I was being very careful to make sure they aligned and were fully open. Three of them were perfect, but that fourth one was tough.

Putting on the mobile base was also tough—I needed to loosen a few of the bolts on the now-assembled base so that the long bars would fit through.

The foot pedals for the mobile base were also a bit of a monkey-puzzle. (It still doesn’t lower smoothly—I might have to contact customer service for that issue). And I had to entirely remove one of the base’s supports to get it installed.

I also wish the foot pedals were in the front. It seems weird for me to have to go to the side of the saw to engage them—but maybe I’m just used to my Ridgid HercuLift Plus mobile base. It’s not a real issue—just an observation/preference.

Don’t get me wrong—the manual is great and the fit/finish of the things is great too—it’s just not 100% a slam-dunk-easy process. (And you’ll need a friend, or two, to lift the top out of the box. Guaranteed.)

4) It’s oily. The nuts and bolts are covered in the stuff. Get out your paper towels, and use them often. Wear your work pants. Everything is oily, oily, oily.

5) The fence was 100% parallel to the miter slot out of the box. Vertically it needed about a 64th of adjustment—but that’s easy.

6) As good as the manual is, I think they need to repaginate it or something. They tell you to look at Page 8—but it’s actually Page 10 that you need. Not a big deal—but something for them to worry about.

7) I didn’t time myself, but I bet it took more than three hours to put the saw together, add the mobile base, and the T-Glide fence. I’ll still need to check all the adjustments, but it’s functional at this point (I assume—I still haven’t cut a board with it!).

8) As well labeled as everything is, the blister packaging of the washers was irritating. They’ve packaged them SO precisely that it’s a little hard to get the washer out of the packaging. Now I’m just nit-picking—but I really did get a little irritated at them while building it.

9) Can we get parts labels (A, B, C, D, E, and F—you know who you are!) that peel off easily? Each one leaves some adhesive residue on the saw as I peel it off. Another nit-picky irritation.

Now, I’ve got some lumber to cut!




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jayseedub

185 posts in 2939 days



8 comments so far

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Craftsman on the lake

3638 posts in 4412 days


#1 posted 12-25-2020 03:19 PM

I put my PCS together a couple of years ago. I went through each of your points and none of this was the same for me except for the weight. I wonder if this is a difference in the saws or if something has changed in the past couple of years. Would be interesting to hear from someone who did this with the saw you have a few years ago.

Anyway, congrats on the new machine. I don’t have that model but I’m sure you’ll love it.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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jayseedub

185 posts in 2939 days


#2 posted 12-25-2020 03:47 PM

So interesting to hear that my experience was so different from yours. Their price went up this year—seems like most of the increase might have gone to oil coating the parts! :-) I’m loving the fit and finish of the saw now that I’ve taken a few cuts—hoping to review it in more depth once I have a chance for the sparkle to wear off in my brain!

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Craftsman on the lake

3638 posts in 4412 days


#3 posted 12-25-2020 06:52 PM



So interesting to hear that my experience was so different from yours. Their price went up this year—seems like most of the increase might have gone to oil coating the parts! :-) I m loving the fit and finish of the saw now that I ve taken a few cuts—hoping to review it in more depth once I have a chance for the sparkle to wear off in my brain!

- jayseedub

As I understand it all steel comes from China no matter where the product is assembled. Tariffs I was told at Woodcraft awhile back. So, tariffs on the steel, then if the companies move back the states we lose the slave wages and the product goes up more. Cars and appliances fall into that category. I think SS is made in Taiwan.. I think.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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HarveyM

153 posts in 2996 days


#4 posted 12-25-2020 07:04 PM

Well Sawstop was bought by Festool in 2017. Maybe that explains some differences?

-- Just a Duffer

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whope

236 posts in 3419 days


#5 posted 12-26-2020 01:56 PM

Most of the traditional table saws sold in the US come out of the same factory in Taiwan. I’m sure each brand name has different specs for what the factory produces. One reason they all look very similar in details. Graphic in this video: https://youtu.be/1OMQ80PlIb0

-- Measure it with a micrometer, mark it with chalk, cut it with an Hammer.

View RCCinNC's profile

RCCinNC

442 posts in 1301 days


#6 posted 12-26-2020 03:02 PM



I put my PCS together a couple of years ago. I went through each of your points and none of this was the same for me except for the weight. I wonder if this is a difference in the saws or if something has changed in the past couple of years. Would be interesting to hear from someone who did this with the saw you have a few years ago.

Anyway, congrats on the new machine. I don t have that model but I m sure you ll love it.

- Craftsman on the lake


Same here. When I put my PCS together, I was amazed at how little grease or oil there was. The cast iron had a peel away protectant that, as I remember anyway, left little residue. There was s huge difference between the Sawstop and the Cosmoline nightmare preparing almost all my other equipment. Good to know the fit and finish is still a company standard.
Enjoy your new saw!

-- Live to putter...putter to live!

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jayseedub

185 posts in 2939 days


#7 posted 12-26-2020 03:28 PM

@RCCinNC says “There was s huge difference between the Sawstop and the Cosmoline nightmare preparing almost all my other equipment.”

That was a pleasant surprise for me, too—I was expecting loads of grease and a ton of mess when peeling off the protecting plastic, but it was just loads of oil, which was better!

View Nathan Muenks's profile

Nathan Muenks

1 post in 15 days


#8 posted 01-10-2021 04:57 AM

The wood shop I work in has two SawStops both with the extension table. Once, I bumped the extension table leg with a cart of lumber and the screws pulled out of the chipboard and fell like raindrops to the floor. I boxed in the top of the legs and they have stayed put since.

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