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5000 lumen 4 ft LED light from Harbor Freight tools

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Review by James Frederick posted 02-01-2020 01:52 AM 8207 views 1 time favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
5000 lumen 4 ft LED light from Harbor Freight tools 5000 lumen 4 ft LED light from Harbor Freight tools 5000 lumen 4 ft LED light from Harbor Freight tools Click the pictures to enlarge them

I always new I needed more light in my Garage workshop, so I finally pulled the trigger on the 4ft 5000 lumen LED light fixtures from HF. I had to build a fixture to hold the lights in the optimal position to prevent shadows.

Being HF I was a bit nervous but it was only $19.99 each, and some of my time. I must say I could not be more impressed with these lights. They are very light weight, come with chains, and are ready to go right out of the box. The before and after pictures tel the tale.

I highly recommend these lights for any area in your shop.

-- No matter where you go, there ya are!l




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James Frederick

276 posts in 4932 days



13 comments so far

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ralbuck

6763 posts in 3478 days


#1 posted 02-01-2020 04:00 AM

LED lights are just fantastic all the way! I upgraded my workshop with some from Bi-Mart at [email protected] not to long ago—also 4 ft.., and love them. As the shop has been wired with ceiling outlets ahead of time they were extremely easy to hang to.

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

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beagle01

2 posts in 596 days


#2 posted 02-01-2020 06:23 PM

5000 lumen fixtures have lit my shop for a couple of years now will never go back to fluorescent .The led are instant on don`t flicker and use a fraction of the power the only downside sometimes they cause static on a radio.The led`s that you see outside of convenience stores make great lights for drill presses ,bandsaws and can be adapted to cast a blade shadow on a miter saw

-- JOHN

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beagle01

2 posts in 596 days


#3 posted 02-01-2020 06:25 PM

forgot to say you can find all of these lights on the net

-- JOHN

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Madmark2

3053 posts in 1800 days


#4 posted 02-01-2020 06:33 PM

Our house is all LED lighting. Philips has 60w dimmable warm white LED bulbs for two pack for under $5. We changed the fluorescent bulbs in the bath rooms and kitchen as well as all the lamps and fixtures.

The spec sheet on the 60w bulbs says they put out 2-1/2 times the lumens for 1/4 the wattage (13w vs 60w) so on an per lumen energy cost the LEDs are 10x more efficient.

We put three small 60w candelabra base LED bulbs in each of the garage light fixtures and now you can see our house from space!

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7882 posts in 2032 days


#5 posted 02-01-2020 10:09 PM

Everyone says LED makes light work. I swapped out all my fluros in the workshop with LEDs… sanding that cabinet was no lighter when rotating it to the different sides. Nevertheless, I could now see my perspiration in total brightness.

Well worth the shekels… and it will save some (shekels) through less power consumption, to boot.

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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GR8HUNTER

8865 posts in 1924 days


#6 posted 02-02-2020 12:39 AM

I never got around to making a post for these lights BUT I changed them out in my shop also …. i too was very impressed with the quality of these lights and just how light they are and very easy to hang :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

View tvrgeek's profile

tvrgeek

2255 posts in 2861 days


#7 posted 02-09-2020 09:07 PM

Just picked one up yesterday at HF. Great price. Works well. I may go get more. Lights are like clamps. Never enough. Quiet, where the ones I installed all through the shop hum like crazy, but I can’t afford to replace them.

BTY, they use about the same power as fluorescent, but because the beam is down, not all around, more is useable so for light on the work, they are about half the power of a T40. What most do not understand is a white LED is actually FLUORESCENT. They are IR LEDs.

They last longer, don’t dim as quick, and an errant chip won’t break the glass.

View clagwell's profile

clagwell

382 posts in 1004 days


#8 posted 02-09-2020 09:21 PM


What most do not understand is a white LED is actually FLUORESCENT. They are IR LEDs.

The first sentence is correct. The second is not; most are Blue LEDs with varying amounts of Green emitting Phosphor to adjust the perceived color temperature.

Fluorescence requires an incident photon of higher energy (shorter wavelength) than the emitted photon.

-- Dave, Tippecanoe County, IN --- Is there a corollary to Beranek.s Law that applies to dust collection?

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tvrgeek

2255 posts in 2861 days


#9 posted 04-27-2020 11:53 AM

AH, technology changes. Anyway. I have 5 now.

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splintergroup

5725 posts in 2434 days


#10 posted 08-02-2021 07:01 PM

The most energy efficient LEDs emit in the UV spectrum, which is, of course, useless for illumination directly.
The manufactures cover the emitters with a phosphorous coating which operates exactly like fluorescent bulbs, taking the high energy UV photons and re-emitting the light photon at a predetermined mix of useful illumination spectra.

This coating needs to withstand high heat. LEDs that emit deeper into the visible spectrum (blue) are less efficient than the UV emitters, but also are easier to tailor “better” looking phosphorous mixes for a higher CRI (color rendition index)

View LittleBlackDuck's profile

LittleBlackDuck

7882 posts in 2032 days


#11 posted 08-02-2021 09:25 PM


The most energy efficient LEDs emit in the UV spectrum, which is, of course, useless for illumination directly.
The manufactures cover the emitters with a phosphorous coating which operates exactly like fluorescent bulbs, taking the high energy UV photons and re-emitting the light photon at a predetermined mix of useful illumination spectra.

This coating needs to withstand high heat. LEDs that emit deeper into the visible spectrum (blue) are less efficient than the UV emitters, but also are easier to tailor “better” looking phosphorous mixes for a higher CRI (color rendition index)

- splintergroup


Phew splinter, talk about speaking in tongues (excluding the conscientious determination to instigate the onset of subsequent discumfiture from such inadvertent disclosure of a disconcerting pun)... I thought I knew how to mince my words. Does all that mean I need to carry around a spotlight to shine on my switches to see if the light is on or off?

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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splintergroup

5725 posts in 2434 days


#12 posted 08-02-2021 10:01 PM


Phew splinter, talk about speaking in tongues (excluding the conscientious determination to instigate the onset of subsequent discumfiture from such inadvertent disclosure of a disconcerting pun)... I thought I knew how to mince my words. Does all that mean I need to carry around a spotlight to shine on my switches to see if the light is on or off?

- LittleBlackDuck

Only if that spotlight emits in the visible spectrum 8^) Do ducks have extend spectral vision range or are they just tuned to the color of a tasty june bug? (People want tho know! 8^)

Spent years designing with high output LEDs, amazing what the brain retains along side those stupid songs or commercial jingles and phrases from the 70’s (You’re soaking in it!)

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LittleBlackDuck

7882 posts in 2032 days


#13 posted 08-02-2021 11:46 PM



.... Do ducks have extend spectral vision range…
- splintergroup

Who said that… I can’t see you in all this white.

And people wonder why I’m black!


... amazing what the brain retains…
- splintergroup

Like bloody sideways picture...

Hell, he just can’t leave that alone!

-- If your first cut is too short... Take the second cut from the longer end... LBD

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