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Yet another Delta 36-725 review

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Review by cmacnaughton posted 08-09-2019 03:47 PM 723 views 2 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Yet another Delta 36-725 review No-picture-s No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

I purchased the Delta 36-725 primarily based on reviews on this site, and due specifically to tinman’s review and setup instructions (https://www.lumberjocks.com/reviews/3822), which were invaluable when assembling and tuning the saw. Lowe’s delivered it and the box was pretty banged up, with styrofoam clearly visible through a couple of large tears in the cardboard so I was prepared for the worst. Fortunately, there was no damage to the saw itself. Assembly was a breeze. The blade was parallel to the miter slots and required no adjustment. At both 90 and 45 degrees it was off-square slightly but this was easily adjusted via the screws in the tabletop. The fence was off square a good 3/16” but this was also easily adjusted via screws on the fence head.

I’ve had this saw now for 4 months and in terms of doing what I wanted a table saw to do, I absolutely love it. Plenty of power for my needs, dust collection is adequate, it’s fairly mobile and I personally think the fence is fantastic. Bear in mind my basis of comparison was the only previous table saw I’ve owned, a Jet Shopline which was not a very good saw. The Delta is very quiet.

I also purchased the Delta ZCI from Amazon. I will not review that here. It is certainly better than the stock throat plate, but not perfect. I replaced the stock blade with a pair of Irwin Marples blades (40T and 80T). I never tried the stock blade so I have no comment on that.

4 months out, I only have one issue, and it really doesn’t have any bearing on the saw’s performance, just quality-control. Paint on both stamped steel wings is flaking and peeling off. The first time it happened was when I installed a router table in the right wing and taped it off with low-tack yellow Frog tape before applying a coat of shellac to the router table. When I pulled the tape up, a substantial amount of paint from the wing came with it. Either the steel was not primed before it was painted or there was a residue on the steel itself that prevented a good bond with the primer. In any event, it only affects the aesthetics of the saw, not the performance, so it’s not a major ding. I’d still recommend this saw without reservation, considering the price point.

The router table (you can see the paint issue, top right):

Paint issue, details:

Finally, I ended up making my own ZCI with some scrap laminate flooring because I was not satisfied with the Delta version. It wasn’t difficult.

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice




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cmacnaughton

49 posts in 99 days



17 comments so far

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grantd

105 posts in 1937 days


#1 posted 08-09-2019 04:20 PM

Definitely a good saw for the money, I’ve had mine now about 5 years and it has held up well, didn’t have the paint issue with mine yet. I’ll have to try again on the homemade ZCI. I tried once a while back and didn’t have much luck but maybe I would next time around.

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cmacnaughton

49 posts in 99 days


#2 posted 08-09-2019 04:57 PM



Definitely a good saw for the money, I ve had mine now about 5 years and it has held up well, didn t have the paint issue with mine yet. I ll have to try again on the homemade ZCI. I tried once a while back and didn t have much luck but maybe I would next time around.

- grantd


I would definitely give it a shot. Here’s what I did, step by step, if it helps:
1. trace throat plate on material (in my case, laminate flooring scraps) with a sharpie, which will give you room to play with.
2. Cut material to size, outside of sharpie lines.
3. Round the corners with a jigsaw or bandsaw.
4. Stick throat plate face down to the material with double sided tape, bending the clips up so they are out of the way.
5. Using a router table with a flush trim bit (roller bearing on the end), place your material so the throat plate is on top aligned with the roller bearing. Trim away all excess.
6. I marked the holes for leveling screws and drilled them out on a drill press, but in retrospect I don’t think you need those holes. Mark the location anyway, because you’ll need them for reference in freehand routing (step 11).
7. Remove the throat plate from material.
8. measure the height of the lip in your tabletop. I cut some smaller scraps of the same material I used for the ZCI and marked the depth with a marking knife.
9. Put a rabbeting bit in your router with probably the largest bearing on it. In my case this created a 1/8” rabbet, which is wider than the actual lip but it doesn’t really matter. For depth, err on the side of having the lip too thick, because you can go back and adjust later. Again, here I started with scraps to test the correct depth and didn’t rabbet the actual insert until I had the depth dialed in.
10. Rabbet the insert all the way around.
11. insert a bit into your router for freehand work. I used a 3/4” inch fluted bit and it worked great.
12. Using the reference marks for the leveling holes, freehand rout the insert to match the iron on the table where the leveling screws are located. Doesn’t need to be exact, or pretty.
13. Replace your regular table saw blade with a circular saw blade, ideally of the same kerf. Lower the blade all the way down. Also, remove your riving knife.
14. Place your insert in the throat. If it’s not level, either adjust your leveling screws or rout a little deeper in your freehand notches.
15. Place a 2×4 over the insert and clamp to the table.
16. Start the saw and raise the blade. You can’t see it, but it’s considerably smaller than your regular blade, so raise it all the way.
17. Unclamp, remove insert and swap your regular blade back in, and lower it all the way down again.
18. place your insert back in the throat. If the kerf of your small blade was wide enough, it should drop right in.
Place your fence over the insert, leaving 1/4” between it and the cut line. Lock it down.
19. Start your saw and raise your blade all the way.
20. Using your original throat plate, note where the end of the cutout is for the riving knife and mark your new insert accordingly.
21. With a jig saw (you could use a router here, too, I guess), cut out the space for the riving knife. I had to cut a little wider, but my jigsaw line wasn’t perfectly straight. No matter.
22. Remount your riving knife and insert your new insert and raise the blade to make sure the riving knife clears your new cut line. Adust/trim as necessary.

Now that I write all that out it seems like a lot of steps, but it’s really not too difficult.

Best of luck!

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

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WoodChuckCreations1

4 posts in 19 days


#3 posted 08-09-2019 04:58 PM

Great review! I have considered this saw but have been reluctant because I was concerned with the dust collection and the noise. I want my next saw to be my last saw, but I’m not sure if I’ll ever save enough to buy a SawStop. Thanks!

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cmacnaughton

49 posts in 99 days


#4 posted 08-09-2019 05:55 PM



Great review! I have considered this saw but have been reluctant because I was concerned with the dust collection and the noise. I want my next saw to be my last saw, but I m not sure if I ll ever save enough to buy a SawStop. Thanks!

- WoodChuckCreations1


My frame of reference was my last saw, which was direct-drive and as noisy as an F-18 on the flight deck. This saw is quieter than my shop vac. I wouldn’t say dust collection is great, but it also is not horrible. I do have to vacuum the tabletop and surrounding areas periodically.

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

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WoodChuckCreations1

4 posts in 19 days


#5 posted 08-09-2019 07:50 PM

My frame of reference is a DeWalt jobsite saw that is deafening and spreads sawdust worse than a toddler with confetti. Because of this, I usually take it outside for cuts. This obviously limits me based on weather.

Great review! I have considered this saw but have been reluctant because I was concerned with the dust collection and the noise. I want my next saw to be my last saw, but I m not sure if I ll ever save enough to buy a SawStop. Thanks!

- WoodChuckCreations1

My frame of reference was my last saw, which was direct-drive and as noisy as an F-18 on the flight deck. This saw is quieter than my shop vac. I wouldn t say dust collection is great, but it also is not horrible. I do have to vacuum the tabletop and surrounding areas periodically.

- cmacnaughton

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Jacksdad

237 posts in 879 days


#6 posted 08-10-2019 02:55 AM

I can’t believe that much paint came off

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cmacnaughton

49 posts in 99 days


#7 posted 08-10-2019 09:52 PM



I can t believe that much paint came off

- Jacksdad


I was surprised any came off. For everything that was wrong with my old Jet Shopline, the paint lasted over the 20 years I owned it. But…on a list of things that could be wrong on a table saw, I guess I’d rather have this than any other problem.

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

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Rick Dennington

6603 posts in 3649 days


#8 posted 08-11-2019 05:15 PM

My son bought this saw a while back, but he lives in Tennessee, but I’ve not seen it in action. He says he really likes the saw, and other than giving it a fine tune-up, seems satisfied with it. It’s his first saw, and that’s all I can tell ya about it. He’s done a lot of remodeling around his house, and works out of his garage…..!!

-- " At my age, happy hour is a 2 hour nap".....!!

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cmacnaughton

49 posts in 99 days


#9 posted 08-12-2019 12:43 AM


My son bought this saw a while back, but he lives in Tennessee, but I ve not seen it in action. He says he really likes the saw, and other than giving it a fine tune-up, seems satisfied with it. It s his first saw, and that s all I can tell ya about it. He s done a lot of remodeling around his house, and works out of his garage…..!!

- Rick Dennington


For me, it has made woodworking fun. I bought my Jet from Woodworkers Warehouse over 20 years ago and it was so unpleasant to use that my interest in woodworking stalled. I still did projects that needed doing (kitchen cabinets, etc.) but it wasn’t fun because of the constant struggle with the saw. This saw made woodworking fun again and I can’t really ask for more than that.

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

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grantd

105 posts in 1937 days


#10 posted 08-12-2019 02:42 PM

Thanks for the detailed instructions, lots of good ideas in there. Just starting a big project and things are everywhere but if I get some time to tinker I may give this another try. Especially when it’s time to cut more plywood as that has a habit of tearing out like crazy

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Ramma

9 posts in 313 days


#11 posted 08-19-2019 11:27 AM

I too own this saw and it has been a good running saw for me. I do think that I will need to do a good tune up and realignment to it though. The stamped metal wings have seemed to dip down on the outermost portions.Also the caster brake pedal is loose and malfunctioning, but this could all be due to me not assembling 100 percent correctly.

View Jason's profile

Jason

660 posts in 3963 days


#12 posted 08-19-2019 03:48 PM

I purchased this saw last summer and have been pleased with it. My point of comparison was a Ryobi so it was a huge upgrade for me.

The only issue I have had with this saw is when I have used my dado stack at 3/4” I’ve had to slide the metal guard around the blade area over to get all of the blades on. No big deal now, but gave me fits trying to get the blades and chippers on without hitting the guard.

-- Jason - Colorado Springs

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cmacnaughton

49 posts in 99 days


#13 posted 08-19-2019 04:35 PM



I too own this saw and it has been a good running saw for me. I do think that I will need to do a good tune up and realignment to it though. The stamped metal wings have seemed to dip down on the outermost portions.Also the caster brake pedal is loose and malfunctioning, but this could all be due to me not assembling 100 percent correctly.

- Ramma


The pedal seems a little loose to me, too, but I think that might just be the design. It works as intended on mine. One thing I have noticed, though, is the levelers tend to vibrate down so that I have to periodically raise them again or they catch on the floor when moving the saw.

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

View seadogmike's profile

seadogmike

4 posts in 6 days


#14 posted 08-22-2019 09:26 AM


I too own this saw and it has been a good running saw for me. I do think that I will need to do a good tune up and realignment to it though. The stamped metal wings have seemed to dip down on the outermost portions.Also the caster brake pedal is loose and malfunctioning, but this could all be due to me not assembling 100 percent correctly.

- Ramma

The pedal seems a little loose to me, too, but I think that might just be the design. It works as intended on mine. One thing I have noticed, though, is the levelers tend to vibrate down so that I have to periodically raise them again or they catch on the floor when moving the saw.

- cmacnaughton


Just purchased this saw 2 weeks ago and loving it. Bought it based on this review. Very happy with it so far. It’s much quieter than my old Craftsman. Cuts true and accurate, not much adjusting was required except for the fence. Regarding the levelers, once the levelers are set, there is an allen head set screw on the top of the levelers. Tightening this prevents the levelers from moving once set.
now for a ZCI and router extension. But first have to finish the Bathroom Cabinet Build, been weeks on the project due to working out of town so much, but Hopefully the cabinet will be finished this weekend.

SDM

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cmacnaughton

49 posts in 99 days


#15 posted 08-23-2019 07:45 PM



Just purchased this saw 2 weeks ago and loving it. Bought it based on this review. Very happy with it so far. It s much quieter than my old Craftsman. Cuts true and accurate, not much adjusting was required except for the fence. Regarding the levelers, once the levelers are set, there is an allen head set screw on the top of the levelers. Tightening this prevents the levelers from moving once set.
SDM

- seadogmike


Ha! I never noticed that. Thank you for the tip, Mike.

Sea dog of the US Navy variety? I’m a former tin can sailor, 1984-88.

-- –Chuck M. Nutmegger by choice

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