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Lagun 18BX - 1" Resaw King Blade - one year review

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Review by edapp posted 02-06-2019 02:26 PM 1180 views 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Lagun 18BX - 1" Resaw King Blade - one year review Lagun 18BX - 1" Resaw King Blade - one year review No-picture-s Click the pictures to enlarge them

I have owned and used my 18BX for a little over a year now, and since this is a relatively new saw I think it deserves a review. I purchased it and a 1” Resaw King blade from Rockler during one of the 10% off deals. Delivered, the saw was a little less than $2,000. The blade is very expensive at almost $200 (I think my previously “most expensive” blade before this was a $35 woodslicer from highland). I swap between this and a 1/4” general purpose blade regularly.

I have been happy with everything about this saw. It was packaged extremely well, went together easily, tuned up easily, and has exceeded my expectations regarding cut quality and usability. More on cut quality below.

Some of my favorite features:
- Large table
- Ceramic guides work extremely well, and are easy to adjust (no tools required). Blade changes are quick and easy because of this.
- Foot brake works perfectly, and switches the motor off. Very impressed with the brake (it is essentially a bicycle disc brake)
- Heavy cast iron wheels, strong motor. Has never bogged down or felt under powered to me.
- Quickly tension and de-tension the blade with the lever, and keep your settings.

Minor gripes:
- Guides under the table can be tricky to reach. I have large hands and I can do it, but it can be annoying.
- I wish the tension lever would disable the motor (powermatic has this feature, if the arm is down the motor cannot be turned on)

Needless to say this has been a MAJOR upgrade from my 14” craftsman. All of my band saw woes have been eliminated. There is no drift, the setup is easy even for a band saw newbie.

On to the Resaw King blade. This thing, combined with the saw, has really impressed me. The ease of setup (it seems to cut extremely well no matter the tension) and the lack of drift produce amazing results for me every time. These pictures show the results of resawing a ~8” white oak board last night. The cut was effortless, results speak for themselves:

Opposite face:

The boards are straight, faces are parallel, there is no detectable drift or wander. And these results have been par for the course in my limited resawing experience.

I used to hate using my band saw… now I have confidence in it, and it is one of my favorite tools in the shop.




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edapp

219 posts in 1700 days



10 comments so far

View BanjoBen's profile

BanjoBen

99 posts in 1171 days


#1 posted 02-06-2019 06:46 PM

I have the 14 inch version which is very similar, and I agree with both of your gripes. My hands aren’t terribly large, and sometimes it’s all I can do to reach some of those knobs on the lower guide. I’ve also, once or twice, turned on my saw with it de-tensioned. It would be nice if that were not possible.

Despite those gripes though, they’re fantastic saws.

View edapp's profile

edapp

219 posts in 1700 days


#2 posted 02-06-2019 07:07 PM



I have the 14 inch version which is very similar, and I agree with both of your gripes. My hands aren t terribly large, and sometimes it s all I can do to reach some of those knobs on the lower guide. I ve also, once or twice, turned on my saw with it de-tensioned. It would be nice if that were not possible.

Despite those gripes though, they re fantastic saws.

- BanjoBen

Completely agree. The 14” saw has got to be the best value on the market. Trying to talk a friend into one.
I find with the lower guides I really don’t have to get them super tight to stay put.

View Fiddy's profile

Fiddy

207 posts in 1581 days


#3 posted 02-07-2019 10:45 AM

Nice review – agree their needs to be more on this saw. I just recently (last Friday) picked mine up at UPS frieght. Haven’t yet made decision on blade and my previous experience was similar to yours. I had a 1971 PM 141 which was a great saw, but very limited in resaw. That being said, still need to get some blades and unsure of where I’ll land initially. Was thinking maybe a 1/2 3TPI to get started, but ultimately a Resaw King seems like it’ll be in my future.

What 1/4” blade are you running? Any issues with stock guides and a smaller blade?

View edapp's profile

edapp

219 posts in 1700 days


#4 posted 02-07-2019 12:02 PM

I cant seem to find my order, but i believe it was either a Laguna or an Olson blade. the 1/4” blade runs just fine, the guides are extremely adjustable. Laguna claims you can run a 1/8” blade but that may be a missprint…. never seen one of those.

I can definitely recommend the resaw king, or any other carbide tooth blade probably. Makes a huge difference, and should last a long long time.

View ugoboy's profile

ugoboy

118 posts in 3304 days


#5 posted 02-09-2019 06:12 PM

I love my 14BX it has been truly an awesome addition to my shop. Probably the easiest blade setup of any bandsaw I have ever owned. The Resaw King blade is expensive but so well worth the money.

-- ~ Guy Woodward, Pflugerville Texas

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1971 posts in 2164 days


#6 posted 02-10-2019 06:19 AM

I am close to pulling the trigger on a RK, really tired of wearing out blades at $25-$30 a pop. How often have you used the blade the past year? For example, are you cutting boards every week or every month, etc.? I know each person uses a saw differently, just wondering how long these things really last.

View edapp's profile

edapp

219 posts in 1700 days


#7 posted 02-10-2019 12:51 PM

ColonelTravis – I am having a hard time coming up with an answer for you. I havent used mine a lot, I am just a weekender but I tend to resaw at least a few boards per project, and use the RK whenever I want to make straight ripping cuts in rough stock or rough joinery cuts. Probably use it a few times a month.

However, on my old bandsaw, I used my resaw blades even less, and would have to replace them more than once a year. The RK feels as sharp now as when I got it, and cuts just as well as when it was new, after 13 months and almost exclusively cutting white oak. I have cleaned/brushed it off once to remove the pitch buildup and it was like installing a new blade.

This is one of those upgrades I cant see anyone regretting…. Not everyone used carbide tooth circular blades not that long ago… and at least when resawing I cant imagine every buying a non-carbide bandsaw blade again. It is expensive, but it should last a very long time, and you can have them resharpened when needed.

View mdhills's profile

mdhills

10 posts in 2903 days


#8 posted 02-10-2019 04:00 PM

Always good to see the reviews after the tool has been in use for a while.

How is the table height and dust collection?
How long of boards have you been resawing? are you using any infeed/outfeed support?

Matt

View edapp's profile

edapp

219 posts in 1700 days


#9 posted 02-10-2019 11:02 PM

Table height works well for me. I am 6’ 0” and the table height isnt something I really notice one way or the other.

I have done a few long boards and some small longs (hickory limbs) that required infeed and outfeed support. I used your typical roller stands which isnt ideal but it seemed to work well enough. The table is quite large which helps. That is one of the things that made the saw much more usable vs a smaller bandsaw/table.

Most of my resawing is going to be shorter boards for panels, where all I need is the fence in the tall position and my paddle push blocks.

View edapp's profile

edapp

219 posts in 1700 days


#10 posted 02-10-2019 11:09 PM

Dust collection is pretty good. There are two ports, which is nice, and I have about as much airflow moving through the lower cabinet as you could reasonably expect. You are still relying on the dust to make its way below the table and through the lower guides before i can be collected.

There isn’t any dust buildup in the cabinets, but you still get a decent amount on the table and off the back of the table just because dust likes to stick between the boards and fall away after the cut.

There is a sliding shroud on the top of the lower door, that can slide up to the bottom of the table when the door is closed. This helps make sure the upper dust port is pulling air through the table, but it is still pretty open. A lot like trying to collect dust from a tablesaw, you really need to be collecting above and below the table to be very effective. Unfortunately there isn’t an easy way to collect above the table.

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