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Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring #111: 3 Dollar Saws

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Blog entry by retired_guru posted 02-29-2020 12:21 AM 336 reads 1 time favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 110: Variable Thickness Anti-Racking Gadget Part 111 of Woodworking on a Half-Shoestring series Part 112: Simple, Efficient Wall Rack for Hand Wood Screws »

The other day I answered a Pennysaver ad for a bunch of hand saws selling for $3.00 each. He told me over the phone he had over 30 of them for sale. When I got there he apologized for the wrong count: 67 saws!

Many had warped, bent and/or dented plates, especially along the teeth, and were quite rusty, with a few exceptions. I found two rip saws and a back saw that had flat plates and spine, respectively. Since taking this picture, I’ve run all three saws through pine lumber. I was surprised at how sharp all three were, especially the large rips. If it wasn’t for the rust binding in the kerf they would be ready for action. I suspect the back saw to be a tenon saw, by the look of the teeth and the way it handled going through the grain better than across, filed for ripping.

Some time next week I will remove the handles, work out the rust, and recondition the handles. I may be able to get away with just touching up the teeth with a file.

-- -- Paul: jack of all dreams, a master none.



8 comments so far

View JCinVA's profile

JCinVA

218 posts in 1608 days


#1 posted 03-02-2020 07:37 AM

Looking forward to the update.

View retired_guru's profile

retired_guru

838 posts in 2137 days


#2 posted 03-02-2020 01:29 PM



Looking forward to the update.

- JCinVA

Thanks. I hope to start on cleaning these up later this week. Sharpening will probably have to wait until I finish construction and organizing in the workshop.

-- -- Paul: jack of all dreams, a master none.

View TraditionallySpeakin's profile

TraditionallySpeakin

47 posts in 519 days


#3 posted 03-02-2020 06:19 PM

If you have a large enough shallow container you could give those a soak for about 3-12 hours in vinegar and that rust will rub off with your finger and a toothbrush. You can then save the vinegar and use it over and over again. Some people don’t know this so I thought it was worth a mention!

-- “If not for Roubo, the back of the U.S. nickle would be blank.” -Roy U.

View retired_guru's profile

retired_guru

838 posts in 2137 days


#4 posted 03-02-2020 07:41 PM



If you have a large enough shallow container you could give those a soak for about 3-12 hours in vinegar and that rust will rub off with your finger and a toothbrush. You can then save the vinegar and use it over and over again. Some people don’t know this so I thought it was worth a mention!

- TraditionallySpeakin

I did know! But I’m glad you reminded me of it here. Some don’t know, too.

I don’t have a plastic container of a size that would work without wasting a lot of vinegar. More important to me and the wife is the lack venting in the workshop this time of year. If I get frustrated or substandard results other ways, I may put off cleaning these up until the weather allows for all 24-hour venting.

-- -- Paul: jack of all dreams, a master none.

View TraditionallySpeakin's profile

TraditionallySpeakin

47 posts in 519 days


#5 posted 03-03-2020 01:08 AM


I did know! But I m glad you reminded me of it here. Some don t know, too.

I don t have a plastic container of a size that would work without wasting a lot of vinegar. More important to me and the wife is the lack venting in the workshop this time of year. If I get frustrated or substandard results other ways, I may put off cleaning these up until the weather allows for all 24-hour venting.

- technoslick

I loathe the smell and taste of vinegar but it is certainly useful!

-- “If not for Roubo, the back of the U.S. nickle would be blank.” -Roy U.

View retired_guru's profile

retired_guru

838 posts in 2137 days


#6 posted 03-03-2020 02:33 AM


I loathe the smell and taste of vinegar but it is certainly useful!

- TraditionallySpeakin

Heh. Tell me about it. My wife can many jars of various types of pickles every year. We have to open all the windows and I have to stay in the workshop until she is done. I can’t take it. Doesn’t bother her. I do wonder if my sensitivity to acetic acid is because of working in an Aspirin manufacturing plant when I was a young man. Didn’t bother me then.

-- -- Paul: jack of all dreams, a master none.

View TraditionallySpeakin's profile

TraditionallySpeakin

47 posts in 519 days


#7 posted 03-03-2020 03:23 AM


Heh. Tell me about it. My wife can many jars of various types of pickles every year. We have to open all the windows and I have to stay in the workshop until she is done. I can t take it. Doesn t bother her. I do wonder if my sensitivity to acetic acid is because of working in an Aspirin manufacturing plant when I was a young man. Didn t bother me then.

- technoslick

Oh man, we can pickles as well and my god the smell of hot vinegar is horrific. Do they use acetic acid in the manufacture of aspirin? I worked at a cidery for a period of time and we were working on a batch of vinegar once. Oh my.

-- “If not for Roubo, the back of the U.S. nickle would be blank.” -Roy U.

View retired_guru's profile

retired_guru

838 posts in 2137 days


#8 posted 03-03-2020 12:04 PM


Oh man, we can pickles as well and my god the smell of hot vinegar is horrific. Do they use acetic acid in the manufacture of aspirin? I worked at a cidery for a period of time and we were working on a batch of vinegar once. Oh my.

- TraditionallySpeakin

The making of Aspirin:
“In this laboratory exercise, you can prepare aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) from salicylic acid and acetic anhydride using the following reaction:

salicylic acid (C7H6O3) + acetic anhydride (C4H6O3) → acetylsalicylic acid (C9H8O4) + acetic acid (C2H4O2)”

Even though we wore heavy rubberized gloves, the crystals and acids would attach exposed areas of skin. It was common for me to be able to peel away a layer of skin off the inside of my wrists just by rubbing gently. Came off like a layer of onion skin. What we breathed in…

-- -- Paul: jack of all dreams, a master none.

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