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View David Smith's profile

Questions about where to put my new Nova 1624 lathe

by David Smith
posted 09-24-2017 01:49 PM


39 replies so far

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

702 posts in 2589 days


#1 posted 09-24-2017 03:02 PM

I’ve had mine for about 10 years so this is just my experience; I do use the legs that come with it.

A bench may make it more difficult to clean under the ways. I would be a little leery of building a platform to stand on just because I tend to get forgetful now. I trip easily enough as it is.
A bench would probably get in the way of an outrigger. That said, I did buy the outrigger when I bought mine and a few years ago sold it at a $100 loss; the only thing it was ever used for was to hold the knock-out bar and for that it was great. If you want to turn larger items I will direct you to a video that shows a different approach which is much better IMHO at the same or lower cost. The different approach would allow you to have an outrigger when needed as well as bed extension when needed.

I have not bolted mine down or added ballast. If you bolt it down it will probably be difficult to adjust the height.
After adjusting the feet properly (as per Lyle Jamieson video) about 60% of initial vibration was removed. It does still shake sometimes but nothing major. I have thought of adding ballast but if I do I would add a heavy angle iron bracket across the legs then a stout shelf between. Add bags of sand as you wish…pretty cheap. I also thought of adding a bar at each end and keep my eyes out for free work-out weights (normally 120 lbs sets?) on Craigslist.

I haven’t needed the bed extension. That said I do swivel the headstock almost 100% of the time when hollowing a bowl. As well as a more comfortable stance the tool handles will not hit the tailstock. If you do not swivel the headstock you may need to remove the tailstock to give clearance to longer tool handles.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2829 posts in 3133 days


#2 posted 09-24-2017 05:15 PM

I don’t use a lathe, but I’m an enabler for my wife. She has the same lathe and I would suggest you try it on the floor using the legs first to see how much area you need for your various stances. My wife would need at least a 4’x5’ platform. Making larger bowls requires large sweeping motions for the insides and spindle work would require moving pretty far down the lathe.

On the legs the lathe would bounce around a bit. Mostly with rough blanks until cut round. We built a large base from a magazine that has triple layers of 3/4 plywood, with 160lbs of sand in the base.

-- I always knew gun nuts where afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#3 posted 09-24-2017 08:47 PM

Thanks for the replies…

So I’m reaching three conclusions: First, start with the legs. Second, I’m probably better off adding ballast if I need it rather than bolting it down. Third, I probably don’t need to get too antsy about buying the outrigger.

I’m looking forward to getting started with this. After 40+ years of making cabinets, remodeling, and doing a few furniture pieces on the side, this is my first venture into turning since my 1968 junior high woodshop class when I made a horrendous-looking lamp (that I think my mother still has).

-- David

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13585 posts in 3668 days


#4 posted 09-24-2017 08:53 PM

You didn’t mention and probably already thought about lighting, but I like both direct and indirect light for lathe work. A window is perfect, and/or a bright light overhead + task light.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#5 posted 09-24-2017 08:59 PM

Good point. I’m planning to put a shop light above the lathe. Is a two-bulb florescent sufficient or should I look for something more?

-- David

View putty's profile

putty

1302 posts in 2894 days


#6 posted 09-24-2017 09:05 PM

I just looked up the lathe, It looks nice except for one thing…manual belt change for changing speeds, that would be a deal breaker for me. If you haven’t picked it up yet, I’m sure you can upgrade to a lathe with a variable speed.

-- Putty

View fredj608's profile

fredj608

2 posts in 2279 days


#7 posted 09-24-2017 09:10 PM

David, I also like an an articulated light that I can swing around to “almost” any position to light the work-piece from top or side or glancing light. It helps in looking for little scratches or grain tear before finishing a piece.

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#8 posted 09-24-2017 09:23 PM



I just looked up the lathe, It looks nice except for one thing…manual belt change for changing speeds, that would be a deal breaker for me. If you haven t picked it up yet, I m sure you can upgrade to a lathe with a variable speed.

- putty

I don’t disagree with you, but this was the best I could get for the $1000 my wife gave me. Like most woodworkers, I’ve got so much on my wish list, I can’t justify spending any more on the lathe.

-- David

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#9 posted 09-24-2017 09:24 PM



David, I also like an an articulated light that I can swing around to “almost” any position to light the work-piece from top or side or glancing light. It helps in looking for little scratches or grain tear before finishing a piece.

- fredj608

Any recommendations on a brand?

-- David

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

702 posts in 2589 days


#10 posted 09-24-2017 09:41 PM

The video (he is using the Nova DVR) show the outboard tool rest starting about 3:45. For the few time either way mount the bed extension on the rest for outboard turning or on the lathe for long spindles, it’s only four bolts.

EVS is very nice but I never change speeds on spindles and usually only once on bowl/platters, Once in a blue moon I may change twice on bowls.

I agree with Fred on the light. You can get a nice articulating desk lamp with a long arm for about $20 and mount to the wall. I use a long goose neck with a small but very bright halogen. Being able to bring the light down to a “glancing” position really shows scratches or defect not easily visible for overhead light. Think of it as casting shadows. It also works greats for lighting the interior of bowls or other deep forms. You need overhead light also but IMHO it can be almost anything.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydDQQQww1AA

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#11 posted 09-24-2017 10:05 PM



The video (he is using the Nova DVR) show the outboard tool rest starting about 3:45. For the few time either way mount the bed extension on the rest for outboard turning or on the lathe for long spindles, it s only four bolts.

EVS is very nice but I never change speeds on spindles and usually only once on bowl/platters, Once in a blue moon I may change twice on bowls.

I agree with Fred on the light. You can get a nice articulating desk lamp with a long arm for about $20 and mount to the wall. I use a long goose neck with a small but very bright halogen. Being able to bring the light down to a “glancing” position really shows scratches or defect not easily visible for overhead light. Think of it as casting shadows. It also works greats for lighting the interior of bowls or other deep forms. You need overhead light also but IMHO it can be almost anything.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydDQQQww1AA

- LeeMills

Thanks. Makes sense…

I showed that video to my wife. I think she’s having second thoughts now, especially the chainsaw part.

-- David

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

702 posts in 2589 days


#12 posted 09-24-2017 10:52 PM


.
Thanks. Makes sense…

I showed that video to my wife. I think she s having second thoughts now, especially the chainsaw part.

;) Can’t blame her. I did think the tool rest was a good idea…. the chainsaw and rasp definitely Not. Like all videos .. take the good parts and discard the bad.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

6021 posts in 4951 days


#13 posted 09-24-2017 10:54 PM

Don’t know what your budget is, but you cannot beat Ken Rizza’s lathe lamps …
https://woodturnerswonders.com/collections/lamps

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2829 posts in 3133 days


#14 posted 09-24-2017 11:28 PM


I just looked up the lathe, It looks nice except for one thing…manual belt change for changing speeds, that would be a deal breaker for me. If you haven t picked it up yet, I m sure you can upgrade to a lathe with a variable speed.

- putty

I don t disagree with you, but this was the best I could get for the $1000 my wife gave me. Like most woodworkers, I ve got so much on my wish list, I can t justify spending any more on the lathe.

- David Smith


Later on you can get the DVR motor upgrade. My wife got it after about 5 years and loves it. I think it was $600. That still is a lot less than the DVR lathe was.

-- I always knew gun nuts where afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

8809 posts in 3487 days


#15 posted 09-24-2017 11:32 PM

manual belt change for changing speeds, that would be a deal breaker for me.
- putty

That is a selling point for me :)

Belts and pulleys last forever and are cheap and easy to replace when/if needed.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#16 posted 09-25-2017 12:45 AM

Thanks everyone for your responses. They were really helpful.

This was my first venture into the LumberJocks forum (aside from a comment or two when I first joined). Very positive experience.

-- David

View Bruyet's profile

Bruyet

44 posts in 2431 days


#17 posted 09-25-2017 12:28 PM

I’ve had my 1624 for three years, and have been very happy with it. All of the previous replies are accurate. Personally, I wasted money on the outboard tool rest, not that it doesn’t work, I just don’t do any outboard turning. By far the best thing I ever did was buying the DVR upgrade. I got mine 18 months after I bought my lathe, and have loved the hobby 200% since then. I actually had the motor fail last weekend (Sunday), and called them Monday morning. I had the new one at my house Friday afternoon. No muss-no fuss.

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#18 posted 10-14-2017 09:30 PM

I wanted to update the folks who helped me make some decisions about my new lathe. I used the legs and put the lathe on a wall that I store my clamps on (just had to rearrange the clamps). I was able to find some chisels on eBay worth the money (how about $35.00 + shipping for two 1” skew chisels—a Sorby and a Marples—and a Sorby beading chisel—yes, all three).

I was concerned about vibration, but I tried roughing out a 4×4 without easing the edges first. No problem. We’ll see how it does when I start making big bowls.

I’ve been using the lathe mostly to practice on. I found some really good You Tube videos, particularly by Allan Batty, on how to use some of the tools. It’s pretty remarkable how many You Tube videos there are on woodturning. I think I’ll be busy with these for awhile.

I did turn a bowl out of a piece of firewood left over from last year. Not worth posting a picture of….

First thing I discovered: it’s going to take some time to master this sucker. After 40+ years of table saws and routers, this is a really refreshing change.

Thanks again for everyone’s help.

-- David

View Hockey's profile

Hockey

182 posts in 1700 days


#19 posted 10-15-2017 02:36 AM

I was watching this thread; but, I didn’t participate . Thanks for the update. I’d like to hear more in the future about how you like that lathe.

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2829 posts in 3133 days


#20 posted 10-15-2017 04:15 AM



I wanted to update the folks who helped me make some decisions about my new lathe. I used the legs and put the lathe on a wall that I store my clamps on (just had to rearrange the clamps). I was able to find some chisels on eBay worth the money (how about $35.00 + shipping for two 1” skew chisels—a Sorby and a Marples—and a Sorby beading chisel—yes, all three).

I was concerned about vibration, but I tried roughing out a 4×4 without easing the edges first. No problem. We ll see how it does when I start making big bowls.

I ve been using the lathe mostly to practice on. I found some really good You Tube videos, particularly by Allan Batty, on how to use some of the tools. It s pretty remarkable how many You Tube videos there are on woodturning. I think I ll be busy with these for awhile.

I did turn a bowl out of a piece of firewood left over from last year. Not worth posting a picture of….

First thing I discovered: it s going to take some time to master this sucker. After 40+ years of table saws and routers, this is a really refreshing change.

Thanks again for everyone s help.

- David Smith


I bet within a year you will have an 8 inch slow speed grinder with CBN wheels just to the left of the lathe.

-- I always knew gun nuts where afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#21 posted 10-15-2017 08:17 AM


I bet within a year you will have an 8 inch slow speed grinder with CBN wheels just to the left of the lathe.

- RobS888

Maybe…

-- David

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

702 posts in 2589 days


#22 posted 10-15-2017 02:29 PM

Looks good, I’m sure you will enjoy it a lot.
I made some minor changes to mine which you may or may not like.
You should have a slot in the tailstock for the keeper plate. Nova only suggest a couple of drops of oil on the plate every few months. Cover the slot with a strip of electrical tape to keep dust and debris out.
To keep dust out of the pulley section I ran a strip of psa backed window seal foam under the lid.
For me it was difficult to see the pulley position (since with the lid closed it is jet black inside.) I carefully removed the plate, cleaned with goo gone, and applied strip refrigerator magnets around the edge. It has never jiggled off in 10 years but is easy to lift with a fingernail to check the speed. It also allows you to use a finger from the front to align the belt in the slowest speed on the spindle.
I also added a paddle style emergency shut off at the right end of the bed.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#23 posted 10-15-2017 02:53 PM

Good ideas. Thanks.

-- David

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

27009 posts in 4393 days


#24 posted 10-17-2017 09:00 PM

Hi David. I bought the Nova 1644 Galaxi and I love everything about it except the two switches in different locations that have to be hit square to make contact. I’d prefer a toggle in one location that I can hit out of the corner of my eye.

Anyway, I have mine mounted a on a lathe station with 6 drawers under it to keep all my all the stuff handy and in one place. I put my old Craftsman lathe on the legs.

I agree that you should try it on the legs first and avoid have a to have a platform to stand on. I have a piece of wood under my feet to cushion the concrete but that has to be moved a lot for sweeping. if you do much hollowing or bowl work, you will have to be removing the tail stock most times and that is where a long bed or an extension is very handy to just slide it to the right.

Here is my review of the Galaxi showing how I mounted it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7X-ZwAyyCnE&feature=youtu.be

Cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#25 posted 10-18-2017 11:14 AM

Jim,

Thanks for taking the time to respond and for the link to the video. I can see the benefit of an extension, even if I don’t plan to turn a lot of long spindles.

The cabinet looks like a good storage solution. My shop is a two-car garage, so space is at a premium. I’m always looking for any place I can put a drawer or shelf. Problem is, we also put our vehicles in the garage during inclement weather (a compromise I’ve worked out with my longsuffering wife), so I have to be able to move stuff around.

I’m surprised you don’t have more You Tube subscribers (you have one more, by the way). It seems strange to me that someone can upload a video on eating macaroni the right way and get thousands of subscribers, but a video with real information hardly gets noticed. I’m looking forward to watching more of your videos.

-- David

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#26 posted 12-09-2017 01:24 PM

Thought I’d do an update on the lathe.

I took Jim’s advice and bought the extension. Makes storing the tailstock a lot easier. I’ll probably bolt the lathe down (it walked about a foot when I tried rough-turning an 8-inch bowl).

I posted a couple of pictures of what-nots I made playing around. One is a ‘get-well’ snowman I made for our granddaughter when she broke her arm (I messed up and put the sling on the wrong arm). The little guy at the podium is a politician—you can tell because his nose grew (sorry, cynical).

-- David

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1379 posts in 2196 days


#27 posted 12-09-2017 02:18 PM

Looks like you’re off to a good start, David. I started Jonesing for a lathe after watching a bunch of YouTube vids about 3 months ago. Still haven’t secured the funds to buy the lathe yet. Too many other priorities.

If you’re like me and enjoy watching and learning wood turning from some of the YouTube masters here are a few that I’ve found that are worth the time:

Brendan Stemp

SG Art Turning

Kyle Toth

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

3183 posts in 3461 days


#28 posted 12-09-2017 02:33 PM

David
I would build a platform below the bed and put a couple hundred lbs of sand or other weight in that to stabilize the lathe. Given the length of the lathe and lack of stabilization on the legs bolting it to the floor will stop the walking but will not reduce the vibration causing the walking. A platform with weight will absorb the vibrations almost completely and you will still be able to move the lathe if in the future you might need to.

This is my lathe. I put a piece of 3/4 plywood under the lathe that stiffened up the mount a bunch. I still need to add weight to the platform to stop the last of the movement. Turning small stuff between center I don’t need the weight but as I go to larger thing I will need to add it.

My neighbor has a big Laguna that he has about 600 lbs of sand under it and It will swing about 16” and there is no movement out of it.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#29 posted 12-10-2017 10:58 AM



Looks like you re off to a good start, David. I started Jonesing for a lathe after watching a bunch of YouTube vids about 3 months ago. Still haven t secured the funds to buy the lathe yet. Too many other priorities.

That’s been my story for 40+ years of woodworking. Best of luck finding one.

-- David

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#30 posted 12-10-2017 11:08 AM



I would build a platform below the bed and put a couple hundred lbs of sand or other weight in that to stabilize the lathe. Given the length of the lathe and lack of stabilization on the legs bolting it to the floor will stop the walking but will not reduce the vibration causing the walking. A platform with weight will absorb the vibrations almost completely and you will still be able to move the lathe if in the future you might need to.
.

That’s probably a better idea than bolting it down. I’ve weighed (no pun intended) both options.

To be honest, some of my most enjoyable woodworking projects through the years have been stands and cabinets for shop equipment.

-- David

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#31 posted 12-17-2017 10:40 AM

I decided to build a ‘coffin’ under the lathe to add ballast. I didn’t want to compromise the legs by drilling a bunch of holes, so I drilled and tapped a single 1/4” hole in each leg to bolt on the plywood and used epoxy to stabilize it. I figured that between the epoxy, the bolts, and the flare of the legs, the ‘coffin’ should hold okay. If not, I’ll try something else. (I may put a couple of pieces of 2x under the ‘coffin’ to add a little more support.)

For ballast I used some old broken retaining wall blocks that were on the property when we bought it. It was nice to finally find some use for them.

This added a lot of weight to the lathe. In fact, I’m hoping that the lathe doesn’t vibrate and ‘walk’ because I wouldn’t be able to move it back into place without removing most of the ballast.

I may decide to add some froufrou to the ‘coffin’ in time, but for now, at least I don’t have a lathe that likes to go for walks now and again.

-- David

View Hockey's profile

Hockey

182 posts in 1700 days


#32 posted 12-17-2017 03:57 PM

David, I am interested in a possible future purhcase of this lathe. How are you liking it now that you have had it for around 3 months? Does the headstock lock down easily and positively for you. And by that, I mean with zero movement after locking it.

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#33 posted 12-17-2017 05:04 PM

The headstock has both a positive lock system and a pretty massive screw that secures it tightly (it uses the knockout tool for leverage to tighten it, so you can jack it down pretty tight). I haven’t had any trouble with the headstock or tailstock moving.

I like the lathe a lot. It’s a little fussy changing the speeds, so if you can afford the DVR version I’d recommend it. It’s really not that big a deal for me, though.

As you can see by the posts above, the biggest issue I had was vibration. There are holes in the feet to bolt the lathe to the floor, but that would only alleviate the ‘walking,’ not the vibration. That’s why I built the box (the ‘coffin’) to put ballast in. The legs that come with the 1624-2 aren’t designed for this, so I had to improvise. Once again, the DVR model has legs that would accommodate ballast without modifying them like I did.

-- David

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1379 posts in 2196 days


#34 posted 12-17-2017 05:26 PM

Interesting approach to solving the ballast problem. Won’t the coffin impede your ability to stand at a comfortable distance to the machine while working, though? It seems as if it may be difficult to position yourself in an optimum spot in front of the lathe to get effective leverage on your tool rest without bending over a bit.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View Hockey's profile

Hockey

182 posts in 1700 days


#35 posted 12-17-2017 05:29 PM

Thanks, David. Were your vibration issues only while turning large pieces?

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#36 posted 12-17-2017 06:08 PM

Won t the coffin impede your ability to stand at a comfortable distance to the machine while working, though? It seems as if it may be difficult to position yourself in an optimum spot in front of the lathe to get effective leverage on your tool rest without bending over a bit.

Good thought—I made sure it wouldn’t be a problem before I attached the front panel permanently. I figured it wouldn’t be much different from having a bottom shelf like johnstoneb’s lathe (in his post above).

-- David

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#37 posted 12-17-2017 06:21 PM


Were your vibration issues only while turning large pieces?

Yes, out-of-round bowl blanks mainly. Things are fine once I get them round. I found that I like turning stuff out of firewood and fallen branches on the property—it’s not easy getting that stuff round enough before I put it on the lathe.

-- David

View Hockey's profile

Hockey

182 posts in 1700 days


#38 posted 12-17-2017 08:17 PM


Were your vibration issues only while turning large pieces?

Yes, out-of-round bowl blanks mainly. Things are fine once I get them round. I found that I like turning stuff out of firewood and fallen branches on the property—it s not easy getting that stuff round enough before I put it on the lathe.

- David Smith

That’s one of the things I like about turning is that you can easily get free wood. Thanks.

View David Smith's profile

David Smith

43 posts in 1799 days


#39 posted 12-17-2017 10:13 PM

I’ll never look at firewood the same way…

-- David

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